Hot answers tagged

68

Imagine you have a friend who roleplays in Second Life. There are all kinds of emoting macros there to supplement the textual channel they use to weave their stories. Now put that person on the stage. "This has so few options, I can't do anything except stand here and talk!" That would be obviously ridiculous, right? The situation is the same in D&D (...


46

You can't build for this on your own, or with our help It sounds very much like the DM is using 3.5e rules as a toolbox to create a home-brewed game that works somewhat like the older AD&D 2nd edition did (sneak attacks, XP, and rogues in general work in 2e as you describe these house rule working). I can understand the motivation—more streamlined ...


44

Wait, what? Sneak Attack Does Work While Flanking What in the world is your DM basing this ruling on? The rules are very clear on this. The rogue’s attack deals extra damage any time her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the rogue flanks her target. Go Ask The DM ...


39

High Reflex Doth Not A Tank Make Having a high reflex doesn't count for anything extraordinary. It's one of four defences beside armor, fortitude and will, and one quarter of attacks missing you more often doesn't make you a tank. The magic of defenders, however, is not a matter of being unable to be hit. (In fact, they need to be hittable, so enemies don'...


34

Yes...sort of. More at L1 than at other levels though. For a brief look at this, let's look at the 4 basic L1 characters and see what their defined combat options are. Wizard: 3 L1 spells/day (they get the extra from an afternoon nap). 3-4 cantrips. Generally the wizard has the most combat options. They have more daily spells than the cleric and they have ...


34

Cunning Action absolutely does let you Dash again, but Dash doesn't work quite like you're remembering (PHB, p. 192): When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. The increase equals your speed, after applying any modifiers. So it's not multiplying your speed, it's adding your speed to your speed. With only one Dash, ...


27

Yes, Sneak Attack and other striker damage abilities (Hunter's Quarry, etc.) are maximized. The only dice you roll are those dice that you get specifically because of the critical hit. For example, bonus dice from a magical weapon. Everything else is automatically maximized. See here. From Critical Hit [ddi] Maximum Damage: Rather than roll damage, ...


27

You can sneak attack whenever you are eligible to. d20SRD's opinion on the topic: The rogue’s attack deals extra damage any time her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to AC (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the rogue flanks her target. There are some additional restrictions (immunity to critical hits or ...


27

I think you're overestimating the difference between a 15 year old and an adult. Human rogues, according to Table: Random Starting Ages, could be as young as 16. That extra year shouldn't make that much difference. You could easily explain that the character is gifted enough to start his career as an adventurer a year or two early.


27

You need not be your class(es) You are playing a character, who has a certain skill set. That character may self-identify as a rogue, and then may recognize a distinct switch from being a rogue to following the way of the monk. Those are options. They are not the only options. Consider Miko Miyazaki: Elan: So Miko, did you take levels in the old ...


24

Setting aside the utility of relegating most passive searching to passive perception and allowing active searching to find a trap that you already have evidence for, most traps and hazards in 4e really don't care about being detected. (This answer is inspired by a now defunct blog post about applying super meat boy to D&D traps (look at the second ...


24

Yes, it would work. How? Well… Evasion is merely a modification of the existing save-for-half convention that many spells use. How does a rogue sometimes evade the damage from an area effect that it seems like they should take full in the face? The same way that a normal, non-rogue can sometimes take only half damage from an effect that seems like they ...


23

Yes! The verbiage 1/turn definitely allows for the use of Sneak Attack out of turn for the rogue if they somehow get a reaction attack (either granted by an ally or by an opportunity attack). Note that this basically limits them to 2x per round since you only get one reaction. But yes absolutely. Note that all of the normal restrictions on SA apply, they ...


23

You're rightly confused — you don't normally get three attacks per round like that. By itself, fighting with two weapons gives you at most two attacks — one from the normal Attack Action and one from a Bonus Action with the off-hand weapon. Vax therefore has something else going on that is allowing that third attack. From the Critical Role Wiki's FAQ: ...


20

The Finesse property allows you to choose between using strength or dexterity when making an attack. As such, so long as you're making a melee weapon attack and choose to use strength for the attack roll than yes, Sneak Attack can be used in conjunction with Reckless Attack.


19

I don't have the sourcebook in front of me, but looking at the online d20pfsrd here, Finesse Rogue is a basic level Rogue Talent, which become available for taking at 2nd level. The 'Feat' Rogue Talent is listed as an 'Advanced Talent', which isn't available until 10th level. So when a rogue is 10th level, yes, the 'Feat' talent makes the 'Finesse Rogue' ...


19

Yes, of course Rage specifies that you cannot do anything that requires patience or concentration, but it does not eliminate your ability to attack accurately (it actually enhances that), nor does it eliminate your knowledge of taking foes unaware. The Sneak Attack ability represents the fact that a rogue has practiced taking advantage of vulnerabilities so ...


19

Your PC can invent a new technique on his own Taken from wikipedia's entry on the Southern Praying Mantis kung fu style: Praying Mantis The association of the term "Praying Mantis" with the style is also controversial. Each branch of the style offers a different explanation. The traditions of the Chow Gar and Kwong Sai Jook Lum branches ...


19

Please note that you seem to be referencing the Swashbuckler Rogue Archetype from Unearthed Arcana. (Direct link to PDF) The Unearthed Arcana rules are specifically pre-release rules meant to gather community feedback. If there's an argument about these, it is definitely up to the DM to decide on them. That stated, they have now officially printed the ...


18

This extra damage is 1d6 at 1st level, and it increases by 1d6 every two rogue levels thereafter. The damage bonus is not cumulative. It increases every odd level, 1d6 at 1st 2d6 at 3rd and so on. Your first guess is correct. P.S : Rapier is 1d6 not 1d8 if you are medium sized.


18

This is symptomatic of an underlying problem. This is not a minor rules variant your GM is imposing: it's a major change to a fundamental mechanic used by many classes and monsters, and I suspect it's just symptomatic of a deeper challenge your group is facing. If so, the rogue thing won't be an isolated incident: based on the other rules changes you've ...


18

The definition of Uncanny Dodge covers this for you: Uncanny Dodge Starting at 5th level, when an attacker that you can see hits you with an attack, you can use your reaction to halve the attack’s damage against you. Fireball is not an attack anymore than spike growth is. This is supported in the PHB pg. 195: If there’s ever any question ...


17

You should play the character you want to play. If you want to be a stealthy archer, be a stealthy archer. Even if your group believe they need someone to tank, rogues are strikers, not defenders. They gain a low amount of hit points per level and, more importantly, have no way to mark targets. Even if you had a rogue with arbitrarily high defenses, enemies ...


17

This is a powerful tactic, but it does have limitations. There are a number of counters to it. To begin with, it breaks down in environments where sight lines are limited, and enemies don't need to chase the rogue down. If the rogue needs to get past the monsters, and the monsters have cover available, the tactic fails. While the rogue can kite ...


17

It's neither the first attack nor the first round. As far as RAW is concerned, if you're surprised, you're surprised at least until the end of your first turn. From the Player's Basic Rules, page 69: The DM determines who might be surprised. If neither side tries to be stealthy, they automatically notice each other. Otherwise, the DM compares the ...


16

No The relevant parts of Use Magic Device are as follows, from the PFSRD (emphasis mine): You can use this skill to read a spell or to activate a magic item. Use Magic Device lets you use a magic item as if you had the spell ability or class features of another class, as if you were a different race, or as if you were of a different alignment. You make ...


16

I wouldn't sweat it. A fifteen-year-old is physically mature enough to represent a first-level character; in fact, the Random Starting Age chart puts the lower bound for a rogue at 16, so it's reasonable to say that this one started early. If the character was a true child, say, 8 or 9, I might recommend the use of this Child template, adapted from d20 ...


16

From a very legalistic reading of the rules, you can use assassinate only once per encounter. Using it requires the opponents be surprised; they are only unaware of their opponents once in a fight; and stealth doesn't grant surprise status. In effect, think of it like this: a surprised opponent is one that is entirely unprepared for being in a fight right ...


15

A rogue gets sneak attack die, or combat advantage if at the begining of their action they have cover, or are concealed. The rogue can charge from behind a wall and get the sneak attack dice, but since odds are they won't really have cover unless there is a tapestry or something like that, most of the cases they actually have to move, and then charge. That ...


15

No, Knowing a spell is not enough to transcribe or copy it All the methods given for putting spells into a Wizard's spellbook require that Wizard has seen the spell in written form. Their options are transcribing a spell that they have prepared (by reading it from their spellbook), or copying spells they have found in other written sources such as scrolls, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible