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39

Describe in the abstract Roleplaying a socially adept character is extremely difficult if one doesn't have those skills in real life, but that doesn't mean you can't run one as NPC, or play one as a PC. RPGs ask us to use our imaginations to fill in many things, like character appearances, settings, and descriptions of action. We try our best to roleplay ...


33

This system seems arbitrary to the player, because it is. There are no objective criteria to be met, and all the decisions are being made by the GM who already has huge power over the game. It's hard not to see not getting the highest reward as being snubbed. Which is not to say you can't or shouldn't ever award things this way: without trust in GM's ...


18

Roleplaying games don't expect people to be good at combat, but simulate it. We then apply a double standard to social things because most of us are familiar with them. For political machinations, in abstract sense, you can get away with "tell, not show." Influence: Science and Practice is an excellent reference for techniques that influential people can ...


17

As you say, this house rule works well for your group. A new player objecting to a house rule they don't understand is no reason for you to change it. And they don't understand the point of the house rule. They've observed their fellow players and seen the rule's results, and are trying to adjust their actions to fit what the rule is meant to encourage — ...


16

I've had good experience with a system somewhat like this, which like Magician's suggestion focusses more on letting the players reward each other, but had as an extra criteria that you had to explain why you were awarding it. This turns out to be the key point. The basic gist was that each person at the table (including the DM) would get one token (which ...


8

You can pretend to be smart. Not to be social (well, kind of) First, let me talk about a related issue. It is common for players and GM to have trouble accurately playing a character smarter than them. One reason for that is that unfortunately, becoming smarter is pretty difficult. Some would argue that if you aren't born smart, there isn't much you can do. ...


4

The trouble with charm is that it is very hard to pin down. We can all describe people who are charming and charismatic but, aside from good looks and clothing, we are at a loss to say where the charm actually comes from. What you absolutely can do is describe the impact this person has on their surroundings, how they make other people feel. Describe the ...


4

I'm a fan of games that have reward systems based on character roleplaying and motivation - most of the ones I play have those baked into the rules so it's very clear how the group is supposed to use them and there really isn't questions. That said, I've found generally when you have these kinds of rules, it helps if the whole group can see what action(s) ...


1

I'd say no. I dislike it intensely as a player as it's fairly insulting to say that I, the player, need to be rewarded for doing what I turned up to do. I would not play in such a game again, having done so in the past. The results have always ended up being manipulative - not necessarily deliberately so - and undermine my investment in the character. After ...


1

If it's accomplishing what you want it to, then there's no reason to change it. If you want to keep a similar system in place while also not feeling like you're forcing your own RP'ing style upon this player (or any player), maybe you could ask the players at the end of each session, "which dice do you think you deserve, and why?". This could mean a better ...


1

Based on my personal opinion of how well they depicted their character There are a variety of game systems that require players to explicitly define their character's motivations and values, Burning Wheel being an example. Character advancement is then tied to how closely the characters hew to these motivations and values. If you're using a system that ...


1

Extra EXP at the end of the game is something that's very optional. I know you're using it as a carrot on a stick for your PC's, but it's a crutch either way you look at it. Honestly, it should be done away with. Role playing comes from the characters and interaction and not everyone can be expected to contribute the 110% that some people do. There are ...


1

Ok, My take on this is, that you shouldn't reward individual Players. This is a group effort and rewarding one Player over another can lead to Players competing for "the best" Roleplay and actually blocking opportunities to Roleplaying together instead of trying to do the best as a party. I have tried both approaches and rewarding the whole group allways ...


1

It sounds like you're at a standoff. You're not socially adept and in response your players act cold and rational. (Granted, there may be no connection between their cold rationality and your own social challenges, but this'll work out either way.) First, you'll probably need to talk, as one responder mentioned, to your players about what they want out of ...


1

As a GM you can often combat player-knowledge by changing the rules of reality, e.g. a wight doesn't have level drain in this campaign but a Gelatinous cube does or something. I had a player who once wanted to try to "invent" gunpowder in a world where it didn't already exist, and use it in a metal tube as a musket. I wasn't too happy as he decided to ...



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