Hot answers tagged

63

You may be encountering My Guy Syndrome. There is a fine line between role playing in depth and falling into "My Guy Syndrome" where the cooperative fun at the table between players is influenced in a negative way. This may be what your DM is concerned about. Review what is at the link regarding the My Guy Syndrome and see if it applies to how the play ...


40

Describe in the abstract Roleplaying a socially adept character is extremely difficult if one doesn't have those skills in real life, but that doesn't mean you can't run one as NPC, or play one as a PC. RPGs ask us to use our imaginations to fill in many things, like character appearances, settings, and descriptions of action. We try our best to roleplay ...


40

Take charge, respectfully Treat your players' action declarations as statements of intent rather than a completed part of the narrative. Feel free to slow things down to insert details and intermediate steps when needed. What they are doing isn't always a problem. When a player says: "Ok, I go there." ...treat what they said as: "Ok, I intend ...


40

If that's the way they want to roleplay their character than why not let them? Why does it matter to you (or anyone else) if they don't "hate" their Favoured Enemy? The PHB says: you have significant experience studying, tracking, hunting, and even talking to a certain type of enemy (pg. 91). Nothing in there says anything about them having to hate ...


35

No. You probably have opportunities in life to enrich yourself unjustly. And you probably don't. Character A is no different from you. But it sounds like you have a problem, not just a question: It sounds like the two factions of players are playing two different games. I won't even label the two games, nor characterize them. Suffice it to say that at a ...


34

This system seems arbitrary to the player, because it is. There are no objective criteria to be met, and all the decisions are being made by the GM who already has huge power over the game. It's hard not to see not getting the highest reward as being snubbed. Which is not to say you can't or shouldn't ever award things this way: without trust in GM's ...


34

Firstly, you should talk to all your players about the issue outside of a session. You can get some personal impressions first with one-on-one conversations, but ultimately the entire group should sit down to discuss the problems. Make sure the discussion is democratic in nature, though. JohnP points this out in a related question: "The group setting can be ...


31

When a player is hogging the limelight like this, the way to deal with the situation is to stop encouraging them. The player is getting their fun by having everyone's attention focused on them (see this question for a similar situation). (This isn't a bad thing, by the way! It just means you have to make sure that the rest of the group gets their fun, too.) ...


29

What your players are doing probably is role-playing. They just aren't speaking in character. Some people don't like to speak in character, being afraid of looking silly or just plain feeling uncomfortable to do so. Especially if you have one person that is very verbose and eloquent in character that can make more introverted people shy away from speaking ...


27

Separation of Player and Character The biggest thing is to remember that just like the Players are not their Characters, you are not the NPCs. Keeping this straight helps eliminate many issues, but it sounds like you have a good feel for this, so lets look a bit deeper. Give the Interaction Purpose Idly chatting and flirting can be a struggle for some ...


25

About Spotlight Hogging and Bullying in an RPG There are two core issues to address: From what you described, this player is someone in the role of Spotlight Hog. Managing Spotlight Time for your players is an art: there is some good advice on it from one of our high rep contributors here. The second issue you address is bullying behavior. This isn't ...


25

Generally speaking, when you go to role-playing game, you should have at least some blank paper and a pencil. In your case, as this is a beginner event, they will very likely be providing the books and dice, and pre-printed character sheets, if any. However, do not expect them to provide a writing instrument for you, and this is quite vital. In any game ...


24

"I am having fun this way and I'm not a liability to the party so there is no problem." From what I can tell you're going with a character who's more about support spells rather than outright damage spells. Which, given your good charisma might actually be a very good choice. But there's two sides to playing D&D: the combat and the roleplaying. So you ...


24

Firstly, it sounds as though your players are doing a lot of the heavy lifting for you in that they are being very easily manipulated without much effort on your part at all. But let's talk about manipulation. Pa-pa-pa-poker face Manipulation relies on getting people to do something without them knowing exactly why you want them to do it, or even that you ...


24

I'll never claim to be the greatest GM, but here's a few things that I've come up with after a couple of years running a game: Describe how instead of just saying what Sometimes all you need to do is give the players the gist of the NPC's message if you add in a description of how they say it. Say something about the nervous tick, the furtive glances, the ...


24

I can make things up on the fly based on his dogma, but that would hardly be quoting, would it? Actually, it would be quoting. Your character can't make up scripture and call it a quote, but you can. You, as the player, have agency to add material to the world you are playing in. How much of the world you can edit is dependent upon your game's ...


21

Well, there's actually a couple of things wrong with your fellow players asserting that your choices are underpowered, without even getting into whether this is an acceptable way to judge a character. First, they're just wrong. Shield is not a weak spell, being one of the lowest-level (if not the lowest) spells in the game that gives you spell immunity, ...


20

Consider how you and everyone else feel about this. Like @KorvinStarmast said, My Guy Syndrome is a very real possibility in this situation. However, that's not the case unless it's causing others (and, in many cases, yourself) to have less fun. Do you feel frustrated when the other player's character doesn't offer assistance when needed? Does he give you ...


19

Your weapon can be drawn before you go in. There's nothing to say that you can't walk around holding your weapon, though provision of light and carrying of gear are common reasons to have sheathed a weapon. (Social nicety is another.) When can you draw it? Out of combat you likely just declare your draw and GM says "okay." In combat, on your turn, you ...


18

As you say, this house rule works well for your group. A new player objecting to a house rule they don't understand is no reason for you to change it. And they don't understand the point of the house rule. They've observed their fellow players and seen the rule's results, and are trying to adjust their actions to fit what the rule is meant to encourage — ...


18

Roleplaying games don't expect people to be good at combat, but simulate it. We then apply a double standard to social things because most of us are familiar with them. For political machinations, in abstract sense, you can get away with "tell, not show." Influence: Science and Practice is an excellent reference for techniques that influential people can ...


18

Generally... no. You shouldn't need to give up your character's integrity. There's usually alternatives and compromises available. Now, there is My Guy Syndrome, which is that you'll do unfun things because "it's what my guy would do", without realising you have a choice there. There's also Making the Tough Decisions which is "you can shape your character ...


17

Give them a reason to explore You are most likely correct that a mini-lecture on the benefits of exploring in game will not get your players to explore more (and may annoy them, as well). You telling them that exploring is a good thing will never be as good as them realizing that they need to explore on their own. But what you can do is provide ...


17

There are no in-game restrictions that prevent any of this: it depends on the DM. This certainly adds fun roleplaying possibilities to a game. As to if it is possible, there are not reasons to not do so. Bahamut is Lawful Good, and Selûne is Chaotic Good. While they are on opposite ends of the Good spectrum, they are both Good. There is no known animosity ...


16

I've had good experience with a system somewhat like this, which like Magician's suggestion focusses more on letting the players reward each other, but had as an extra criteria that you had to explain why you were awarding it. This turns out to be the key point. The basic gist was that each person at the table (including the DM) would get one token (which ...


16

A breath weapon is a tool to achieve a purpose, so probably they wouldn't. They'd threaten to do something more specific with it, instead. So, none of these: Watch out or I'll sword you! I'll get you with my dagger! Watch out or I'll breathe on you! But instead, more like these: Are you truly so ready to die? *rests hand on sword ...


15

So I see two concerns the other players might have here. Neither one is really any of their business, but for the sake of understanding their perspective, I suspect these are the two concerns they may have: Your character will be less effective than normal, and the party will suffer, be more likely to fail. Your character will be less effective than you ...


15

This will get gimmicky and old pretty fast if you're not careful, and you run the risk of burnout. That said, there are some ways to make it work. Pre-plan a few lines you know will get used. Prepare some fairly generic rhyming words you can use in a pinch to put a few lines together. Do not solely use couplets! Mix up your rhyme scheme with limericks ...


15

Ask your DM None of these things are specified by rules—they're entirely the province of your DM and group's creativity. Talk to your DM and find out—or work out together—what the answers are. Nobody outside of your group knows your group's world, and can't answer questions about it with any authority.


14

GMJoe does bring up two important points, although I fear he skipped the most crucial one. Setting Entanglements: A player is far less likely to abandon a character if they feel that the character will be missed, that their presence and history is respected in the environment they live in. I had a player who had a tendency to switch characters once every ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible