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44

Check This Part Thieves and gamblers, fast talkers and diplomats, bandits and bounty hunters, and explorers and investigators all might be considered rogues, as well as countless other professions that rely upon wits, prowess, or luck. Although many rogues favor cities and the innumerable opportunities of civilization[...] Class fluff is, for the most ...


43

There's no such thing as senseless violence, according to the one who commits it. Characters who kill or torture without at least an internal justification are crazy, not evil. You don't have a reason to kill people in the party or at random, so you don't. This doesn't make you nonevil. Also remember that just because you're Evil doesn't mean you're a ...


34

Alignment is a mess, particularly Law and Chaos I am almost certain that you will never find two people who define Law and Chaos exactly the same way. The books definitely don’t; there are actually different definitions of each such that the same action or person could be equally described as Lawful, Neutral, or Chaotic, because the different definitions ...


30

Well, I don't know about bushido, but in Rokugan, I think the answer of what they should do is "nothing", at least by themselves. Now, let me explain: The brother of the Empress is way too high in the social scale for them to affect him in any honorable way, at least under normal circunstances. Possible outcomes: Should they try to take justice in their ...


26

My first rule of changing something you don't like about the game... When you'd like the game to change, talk to the group. Take what you just explained here and explain it to the group... you feel like you're getting the short end of the stick and would like more interesting duties once in awhile. I would be surprised if they reacted badly. If you ...


25

Don't solve your player character's moral conflicts Telling your player what they should do is boring. They should confront their own moral conflicts, and take their own options and carry their consequences. All the samurais codes can't prevent any kind of situation, in the end, any individual must take the action that he thinks is less dishonorable. I ...


21

The main issue with this question seems to be whether you want yourself (the player) to make suggestions for play that your character would never come up with. This seems to be a style issue - some parties are fine with this, some are not. If your party is, and you are too, then go ahead and make them. Then play your character as perhaps not understanding ...


21

Not all rogues are lawbreakers as strongly as the build describes. A good rogue can be like the Secret Service: Because they have all the detection skills they can be great at knowing when a trap/ambush is in the wings. Additionally, one extremely overlooked role of a rogue that's especially useful with the cleric cross-classing is the role of the ...


18

The question is a bit inaccurate: the monster entry for strix lists the example strix as Neutral. So, in this case, Paizo seems to agree with the question asker. That said, the remainder of my answer assumes that the entry did make them Evil, since plenty of creatures are marked Evil for similar reasons. Don’t try too hard to make alignment make ...


17

Tim's answer is great, but I want to expand on it. This especially applies if you're thinking "NPC villain" and not just "powerful monster." Liches are people, too Start by remembering that a lich was a person... human or not, it was an intelligent creature that, for some reason, went to great lengths to cheat death. When you think of your lich as ...


16

TV Tropes calls this situation mean character, nice actor (and vice versa). It's quite common in the drama world but doesn't seem to have an established term beyond acting. You sometimes hear playing against type for this, although that's more about a difference from your previous roles, not your own personality. The specific case of an opposite-sex ...


16

Aside from the Same Page Tool already listed, I'd say two things would be worth considering: 1. Emphasize difference in expectation If the group is used to playing one kind of game style, you have to explicitly point out the differences in what you're trying to do. Something that flags me as a potential problem is this: [T]he party meeting each other ...


15

For an analogy, Gnomes have a long time enmity with humanoid reptilian, possibly due past aggression, and have developed tactics to fight against them more efficiently. Are gnomes evil due to that? Not every lizard man out there is evil, but some of them are, and gnomes may have very good reasons to act paranoid and aggressive when lizard men are around. ...


15

One interesting route back to Lawful First, you and your DM should agree on some details about your alignment change. The typical way to rule a magical change like this is that: Your personality and values have in fact 100% changed and you love your new perspective. "That old me was deluded to think law and order made the world a better place. They're the ...


15

This is a non-starter. Paladins don't get their powers revoked in D&D 4e, nor are they granted by a god to begin with. If you have your PHB1 handy, turn it open to the Paladin class description and take a look at the paragraph in the top-left of the second page. In short, Paladins receive their powers through training, an initiation rite, their ...


14

Meta: Do the grown up thing: Ask them up front that you perceive them losing their enthusiasm for the game and that you would like to know if it's true (or just your perception) and if so, why this is happening? Then, you can resolve things so that everyone is happy. In game: If the problem is one of distraction, then set aside time to drink coffee and ...


14

You don't mention a setting, and that could make a big difference. For AD&D 2e (Ravenloft specifically) there was a sourcebook entirely on Liches that at least touched on this. I believe it was Van Richten's Guide to the Lich. But let's look at what we might call a "stereotypical lich". Stereotypically, Liches are obsessive. You tend to need an ...


13

And just for completeness sake, as nearly all answers here seem to address to the question "How can I avoid explicit torture scenes as a DM?" If it is OK So after going through the metagame topic of "Is it OK?" (preferrably in advance), and if it is OK, you can role-play it in a nasty simulationist fashion. Prepare for the session as usual: research ...


13

Evil is not just kicking puppies for the sake of it. Well, usually. Generally speaking (in AD&D terms anyway) just running around bashing people in the head and cackling wildly is a pretty mindless and boring character. What your character needs is motivations, reasons and goals and then a lack of morals or twisted moral code to follow. Motivations ...


13

Have a quiet discussion outside of game with your DM to see if he is ok with this course of action. This is a question of the social contract. Is your DM going to penalize you for this via passive-aggressive rulings, or will he support your choices? Either way, this isn't a question for the rules. This is a question for a quiet conversation outside of game ...


12

There is nothing explicit within 4e's rules against using powers out of combat.. Some powers, such as the Executioner (Assassin)'s class dailies, have out of combat uses for the power written on the card. Further more, 4e allows you to choose whether you are dealing lethal or non-lethal damage if you damage an enemy to 0 hp without any penalties to you as a ...


12

DJ Clayworth touched on it, but my experience with this is that when you're talking about out of character strategy planning, parties seem to fall into a few general camps: Don't do it, keep as much talk in character as possible. It's okay, but try to reason what your character would actually know. Forget about your character's intelligence, if you have an ...


12

Bottom-up instead of top-down You wrote that I gave them a general history of the planet, a specific history of the continent we started on and specific history of the starting town and surrounding areas. It seems like you are using a top-down approach. I generally prefer bottom-up. Most people in a fantasy setting will not know anything about the ...


12

Loyal Does Not Mean Mindless Your leader may say to hold the back lines, but if your character (via your own ingenuity) comes up with a good idea for how to use his powers then bring it up. You can be the 'voice' of the leader in social situations, you could suggest your abilities as a non-violent way to infiltrate an enemy castle, and all sorts of things ...


11

Remember that in D&D, damage is very nebulous - and in 4E particularly so: You reduce it not to kill but to defeat - whether through imprisonment, eternal slumber, knocking them unconscious or, ok, murder. Additionally, your damage reflects your skill - it increases as your experience increases. As such, you can decide to deal less damage than your ...


11

Are you familiar with the Same Page Tool? It sounds like you had expectations that you tried to convey subtly to the group in-game, but this wasn't overwhelming enough to overturn their existing expectations or the conflicting messages being sent by your campaign kickoff's dominant tropes, so you weren't on the same page. Getting on the same page is the ...


11

I think you've already answered your own question in your write-up: your character has lost his faith. Tragedy and self-doubt have shaken his beliefs and driven him to lose his devotion to his code and his cause. You don't need a god to punish him — the paladin is already punishing himself! Maybe he hates Pelor now. Maybe he just thinks of himself as ...


11

Here are some ideas for dealing with overly clever players. Let the wookie win. Sometimes the party does something clever. You can take it away in a contrived fashion and they'll resent you for it. Or you can give them bragging rights and they'll proudly tell all their friends about the time they took down a dracolich at level 3 with a potion of ...


11

How can I get my players to engage in the authentic roman atmosphere I've created? This reminds me of a well known author who said (paraphrased) that if they spend weeks researching it, there'll be a whole chapter on it! So, slow it down and give them little bits to digest. Let's go with food as an example: a friendly NPC invites the PCs for a dinner ...


10

"Like" can take a number of forms, each of which can be achieved in a different way. One of the most reliable ways to get the players to like/respect an NPC is trust. Set up multiple scenarios where the NPC takes a big risk in trusting the players and having it payoff, and vice versa. This is the classic, "I got your back" situation, used very frequently ...



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