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There are already a lot of good answers to the mechanics aspect of the question so will just add a few flavor and RP bits. Disguise If you do not want to spend money on a Hat of Disguise, you could just use a more mundane method. As you said your PC is female, she could use make-up. This works on both in and out of game level, as the other players may just ...


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Elan are immune to (whatever) Person effects and do not sleep, plus they can spend power points to prevent damage, get bonuses to their saves and a few other things. How can I use these things without being outed to the party right away? The DM's okay with me playing a psionic character, while the others do not play psionics and do not know a lot ...


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Ghouls are Chaotic Evil unless the DM houserules otherwise. For friendlier undead you might want to look at ghosts. Ghosts can be any alignment, and are mostly Neutral, and are more willing to carry on a conversation. Elves typically use other elven ghosts as guards, or sources of ancient advice. They are more than willing to converse. Are they truly ...


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Since D&D's ghouls, designed by Gary Gygax, were strongly based on the critters of the same (Arabian) name invented by H.P. Lovecraft... The D&D ghoul was inspired by the Lovecraftian critter of that name and my own imagination. they first appeared in play in c. 1970 in the Chainmail Fantasy Supplement table top games. – Gary Gygax, August ...


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How to Lie to your Friends I've had a couple experiences like that in games that I have played in, as well as some GM'ing situations where players were actively working against other players (I actually encouraged it in that setting, because that was half the fun). Here are some take-aways that I had from it. These are all systems for Out of Character ...


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I've done this on both sides of the table, playing an elan as a human and DMing with a gnome masquerading as a halfling. Bluff works well if any suspicion falls on you. A Hat of Disguise works wonders for the looks. As far as abilities go, it depends a lot on your group. If you play with newer players they won't know the rules well enough to realize you ...


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Bluff Works - In Character (IC) Only So long as Elan and Human are indistinguishable at a glance, Bluff will do what you need. If they're obviously different just by looking, you'll also need Disguise or magic. The harder part is keeping it a secret Out of Character (OOC). If you don't want the other players to know, then you'll have to take some extra ...


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First of all, I think that the other answers are fantastic. That said I'd just like to complement them with my own thoughts on the topic. (I'm going to paint a picture of a supportive introvert for the rogue in hopes of better communicating certain points. Remove supportive introvert and insert whatever motive you have for your character.) Just because your ...


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Your character must be a loner for a reason. e.g. Brooding characters have a history of being confronted with social interactions in which they got the short end of the stick. Try to have your character engage in one-on-one conversations with other PCs because that's when they feel they have more control of the situation. At Roll20.net, there are often lulls ...


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Playing the quiet type: Describe your actions and reactions, even if you have nothing to say. If you do have something to say, your conversations ought to get directly to the point. Know what your point is before you start the conversation, get to the point and be done with it. Though, I have to say, that's kind of boring. Playing the loner: If your ...


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I think that a living town is first and foremost a town that has some interesting NPCs, and in addition there are some things that are happening there, affecting the NPCs and being affected by them. As such is the case, I usually divide my town-fleshing into two parts: Fleshing NPCs and fleshing the surroundings and town. I'm an improviser kind of GM. As ...


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I generally like to only do a few NPCs in a given area myself. On the other hand, I use the towns as ways to improvise adventures/quests. Set up the town as having particular strengths, and particular longstanding problems ("They've got great industry, but the last 8 years has been drought..."). Either point to dungeons as having solutions ("If we got the ...


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There's two ways to make the loner character work in an rpg. First, descriptively. Constantly narrate HOW you do things, the gestures, the attitude that comes across in your actions, along with the internal monologue. (Brian Ballsun-Stanton's answer is very good about this). Second, have small conversations instead of big ones Get aside with another PC ...


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Use out-of-character discussion to let the other players know you're engaged and not bored. This is more important in online gaming because you don't have any body language, eye contact, or other social cues to work with. In particular, tell them that you're playing a loner. Engage with the group in-character privately, when NPCs aren't around. Keep your ...


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When I've played (or joined in others playing) these quiet characters, the best way to run them is have an almost noir style internal monologue. "I looked at the wall, and frowned. I wasn't certain, but there might be something behind it. Best not to mention it though, I'd look like a chump if I was wrong." is much more interesting than. "..." ...


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Full disclosure: I started with the TSR Red Box set, and played heavily through 2nd Ed, as well as many other systems. I've looked at but not played 3.5, and haven't looked at 4 or Pathfinder, so I acknowledge that the mechanics may have changed drastically in the intervening years. Also, all of this presumes some sort of temporary incapacity (magic, psi, ...


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I primarily run my games through improvisation as well, because I've found it to be extremely effective. I don't do a great deal of pre-planning, because I learned about a decade ago that the more you try to deliberately plan, the less will go your way. That said, what I tend to do is create my big characters... The main villain, the person hiring them, etc, ...


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At first, NPC have no soul Seriously, I think that regardless on how you describe the bartender, there is a high chance players won't care. I think physical appearance does not really matter, also in their mind, the bartender is probably already a stereotypical artifact of DM's improvisation Players give them soul Now, I understand you want to change ...


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Hmmm. I don't know of any guides, no. I can give you some thoughts, though. As far as actually verbally communicating, I thought a good tip was to just describe what your character is doing as if you're collaboratively recounting an event in rl from earlier that day. Speaking in character isn't a necessity in any games I've played, and allowing for more ...


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I don't know any books, but I've taught a lot of non-roleplayers how to roleplay, so I ended up with a lot of personal experience getting people up to speed in short order. I've taught people how to roleplay and run them through full adventure one shots in 1-3 hours including teaching time. Roleplaying 101 Designed for non-roleplayers to get a basic idea ...



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