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1

This harks back to one of the major rules for storytelling in scifi and fantasy: "The less you explain, the more believable it is." What this statement really means is that people will fill in "hand waving" with what makes sense to them. The more details you provide, the more hooks there are for disagreement, arguments and disputes (and the greater ...


0

What languages does each player speak? It is not always possible to map your setting's languages to Earth languages (on which player) completely, but if the elf's player speaks some language the dwarf's player doesn't understand, let him start speaking the language! If you as the GM don't understand the language, you can ask the player for a brief summary in ...


1

Read texts on these languages until you get like they sound. Then learn how to gibber and sound similarly. I have done it many times, specially with Sindarin. You don't have to me a master in Tolkien languages to make a decent impression. Problem is, are there written texts on D&D elvish and dwarvish? If not, you should look for something similar. For ...


0

I'd say something like The Elf says something in Elvish, you understand "Bla bla bla dwarves bla bla pigs bla bla. Bla bla Cirith Ungol bla bla dwarf." ... and let the player figure out if that means he's being insulted or not. Edit: if you want a bit more flavour you can use variants of "bla": dwarves say "kag zag", elves say "lam nyam", orcs say ...


2

Another option is to describe not only the elf's spoken language, but also their body language. Anyone who's annoyed with you is going to have plainly obvious behaviour, such as: a frown 'knitted' eyebrows increased colouring to their cheeks abrupt gestures such as hand slashing and finger stabbing Also, their language might be sharper, their ...


19

Unless you and the players speak Elvish, you have three options: Say that they're speaking another language without saying what it is. Say that they're speaking Elvish. Say a few Elvish words for flavor. Think about your experience with hearing other languages. Have you ever heard German spoken? (Assuming you don't speak German.) You could describe ...


37

This is a place where you should probably revert to descriptive GMing rather than reciting the character's lines. Say something like: The Elf approaches you (the dwarf) and says something in a language you don't understand. It sounds like elf talk to you, but you don't have any idea what he's saying. Your player can then react to this situation. If ...


4

Every game operates in a context. In this context, you're playing a game of heroic fantasy where a team of heroes change the world, right? Your character sees humans as fundamentally flawed, evil and destructive. Your character has no connections of loyalty, ideals, or relationships to the party. Consider how these things do not go together. Your ...


7

In my book that kind of behaviour is more neutral evil than true neutral. You wouldn't kick a dog when its yapping aimlessly, so mockery and insults from a human would neither bother you that much. When something directly harmful is oriented towards you, you might take the nature-induced kill-or-be-killed method into consideration, but otherwise? Also when ...


23

Be the wiser character. If you think that all humans are an inferior threat to nature but you need their help, your character shouldn't be surprised when they verify your assumptions. You "knew" they were problems going in and you still chose to work with them, so seeing evidence of it shouldn't change your approach. Someone calls you an idiot? You're ...


2

Attempting to grab someone by their hair and lift them up would probably rip their hair out. I guess I should note here that if you were to grab someone by their hair and attempt to lift them that their hair would be ripped out of their scalp and they would fall to the ground and die. But that's beside the point. You probably took a step too far.. It's a ...


22

It's pretty simple: don't be a murderous angry jerk. If you reach the point where you're going to threaten people, or kill them, or kill the entire party, the simple way to handle that is... not do it. If you feel you must do it, you're probably falling victim to My Guy Syndrome, where you think "well, my guy would do it" as if it remotely limits your ...


12

You built a murderous anti-social character. Yes, demonstrating your ability and willingness to kill someone for saying something you didn't like is murderous and anti-social behavior. And your question seems to be, "How can I continue being anti-social and disdain humanity?" My answer is: Transition your PC into a recurring NPC villian. He is ...


1

Chaotic creatures don't organize themselves at big groups, at least not for long, that's their definition. So don't try to find behavior examples at governments or big societies. Chaotic groups like orc bands should behave like gangs, some criminal groups and weird collections of sociopaths. Their leader will be the stronger, meaner person, capable of ...


0

I've had to teach a LOT of non-roleplayers, how to play. One shot 1-2 hour game - figure on 3-5 scenes and a situation that fits that. Action, or drama, anything with a VERY CLEAR set of goals. Not an investigation Most complex mechanical conflict resolves with no more than 3-4 dice rolls/turns/rounds Either pregens, or character building that involves ...


1

Some of the techniques you will use will be the same as in my other answer about transitioning long-time roll-players to roleplaying, but in this case you have the benefit of working with new players without a lot of preconceptions built up. The biggest thing you can do is to make sure you are, explicitly and implicitly, encouraging in-character roleplay in ...


0

You've got this marked as system agnostic. May I suggest you choose the RPG you will be playing with some care? Ask your players what genre of story they are interested in, and look for a rules light game in that genre. We have lots of game recommendation questions here. It might be worth asking what they're looking for (Sci-fi adventure, like Star Wars? ...


0

First off, if random wizards in inns are handing out potions and the DM does not suggest a sense motive or somesuch, I have some reservations about your DM. The DM can kill you more or less at any time; it is generally considered unsporting for them to require constant vigilance on the part of the player. Some campaigns also lack a win condition like you ...


2

The thing is, your character can have "flaws" but those flaws can add interest without being "flaws" from a competitive point of view. Yes being a trusting idiot can get you killed - but if you want to play a trusting idiot team up with a suspicious paranoid. The two of you can play off each other, have a lot of fun, and together balance out each other's ...


0

I agree with Longspeak's answer, that you should let their playstyle naturally emerge. However, I come at it from a different angle that I think warrants a separate answer. Or maybe not, since it doesn't really make sense outside the context of all the other answers, but I think it's worth saying so here I go. Playstyle isn't just about preferred balance of ...


3

Reading the comments, I understood that what you're looking for is a way to immerse them in the story and to give them a taste of what role-playing is really about. And maybe even to encourage them to play the characters. Here's how I do it, when I come to a group with completely new players. Hopefully, it will help you a little. Explain to them quickly and ...


1

I'm going to pipe up here and say "It depends upon whether or not you follow all the rules." The challenge rating system is not set up for just monsters. It does focus on monsters because it's really easy to stat out a monster and give it a CR. It's a lot harder to stat out a CR for a social situation. This is, however, why we have NPC classes, like ...


1

PipperChip's answer is solid. One thing to add... We know there are different types of player, who play for different reasons and get different things from the experience. Even though they have never role-played before, your friends will emerge as one of the types. Let them. Take care not to make too many assumptions about what styles and preferences may ...


8

I'm assuming your players already understand the basic concept of roleplaying. The Ground Rules of Roleplaying Tell your players that roleplaying is supposed to be fun. They should do what they think is fun, but they shouldn't ruin other people's fun. Forget not that the GM is also a people whose fun can be ruined. Also explain to players that sometimes ...


16

From Experience I wish I could point you to a guide, but alas, I must rely on my own experience introducing people to role playing. There are a few things to help people get into the swing of things: Directly address the social contract, and how the game is going to work. This is really basic. I usually address this by saying something like: "We're going ...


5

How To Roleplay For Fun and Profit Don't Roleplay Idiots Does roleplaying inherently put you at a disadvantage? Absolutely not, unless you are roleplaying a particularly naive or trusting character. Or you are particularly committed to stat playing when it comes to intelligence ("Farfig Newton" has an 8 INT so he could have an 18 STR and so now he is ...


-2

Chaotics believe in the individual's right to decide and that combining into groups usually requires too many compromises to allow a creature to achieve the best in life (whatever that may be, guided by whether they are Good or Evil). So chaotic societies are generally going to be broken into small groups which share a lot of the same culture and goals, so ...


2

The notion that you cannot simultaneously optimize and roleplay is known as the Stormwind Fallacy, that is, widely recognized (and named!) as an inaccurate statement. If anyone tells you that you cannot do both, you should ignore them. Their narrow-minded insults are not worth considering. The Stormwind Fallacy is often extended to the statement that ...


4

Play your character like a real person! I'm also a quite competitive player - what I see as a win in a roleplay game? If my character achieves his goals! That doesn't have to be winning a quest, killing an enemy, getting all the Gold an XP, but real in-game goals for the character! And if you character has some predefined goals, he will do everything to ...


8

It depends of your group's conception of RPGs. What is winning? Win what? Win who? Most RPGs differ from boardgames in the winning concept. There isn't an end square, there aren't winning conditions, there is no endgame. There are only infinite possibilities and choices your character can make. The GM is not there to beat you, nor you to beat your GM. It ...


3

Depends on the GM. Some GMs delight in trapping players. They set up traps, everywhere, like a lost little girl that is actually a monster, and various other things that 'normal people' would be caught by and players who play cautiously and carefully and in a very optimized fashion tend to do better against those sorts of traps. It's a really weird style ...


24

Not necessarily I've run about a dozen games in the last four years, and in each of them the roleplayers come out on top. Some of them happen to do a little min-maxing on the side (like the troll in Shadowrun who lived up to his race's namesake), but the truth of the matter is that it doesn't really matter. The rules encourage it D&D is one of those ...


25

I do. I'm so competitive I managed to win a game of Fiasco (a very non-competitive game). Luckily, I know why you feel this way and where the source of the problem is. Unfortunately, D&D 3.X is more often than not the cause of this dicothomy. There's a thing game designers call reward cycle: encouraging the players to behave in a certain manner by ...


6

The rules on the Knowledge skill are helpful in explaining what people might be expected to know and identify. Most people won't have these skills, and will thus only be able to make a 10 at best. You cannot make an untrained Knowledge check with a DC higher than 10. This means identifying a creature isn't going to work out for most people, except ...


4

In adition to other answers, its worth to point that, in Golarion, depending on the creature type and the place, familiarity and reactions can be very different: A non-shapeshifted devil walking in broad daylight in Absolom would cause quite a stirr, due to ignorance, religious indoctrination and superstition. In Cheliax, the former would be recognized as ...


0

As Peteris said in his answer, reading literature and watching media help get inspiration. In addition to that, Shadowrun is the mixing of two themes: Cyberpunk and fantasy. So any character you can think of in one, add a twist from the second. For example: A great singer from a nu-grunge band, grown on the mean streets of $YourHomeTown. But he's a ork, ...


3

Conceptually Good, Practically Meh Sometimes, you come across things you go, "This is XYZ, and I like X, I like Y, and I like Z- it should be perfect for me... but I'm not feeling it." You don't have to like all things, and just like having a flavor of food you don't like, you can't really force yourself to like it. That may be your situation here. The ...


11

Read fiction The "feeling" for most settings is less based on the actual setting and more on the general cultural bakcground that you've been exposed to - fantasy literature for the 'generic D&D' environments, swashbuckling movies for pirate-style settings, etc. If you want to get a good feeling for Shadowrun, read good novels of the genre - not of ...


8

Commoners (unless they spent points on the skill) and any other person who has not spent points on knowledge skills usually have some vague ideas about existing creatures, but it's mostly misinformed legends. Commoners might know what an elf looks like, but couldn't recognize an elf from a fey or from any lithe being with long ears and great beauty, such as ...


5

The glowing forehead rune on an Eidolon is probably a clear giveaway that it isn't the basic creature it's modeled after, especially if the Summoner and his glowing forehead rune is also there. The eidolon’s physical appearance is up to the summoner, but it always appears as some sort of fantastical creature. This control is not fine enough to make the ...


4

Introduce Xorvintaal Xorvintaal is a draconic game described in Monster Manual V. It is awesome and fantastic and perfect for PCs interacting with dragons. In many ways, Xorvintaal is like chess, very much about grand strategy, long-term planning, and using all the pieces on the board, from the lowliest pawn to the great queen. But it’s not played ...


1

I think your problem is not personality - any noble can have the same fiery, haughty personality that a dragon can, albiet they won't actually know everything that has happened in the last 500 years. You need to emphasize the one major difference that a dragon has over your average haughty noble, something that is very, very easy to notice about dragons. ...


0

You need to come up with a way to indicate, non-subtly, the out-of-character actions you are taking, and to distinguish them from in-character acting. The other answers have given some good suggestions, and ways to bring this up to the other players. What I would suggest to help distinguish the two, rather than pointing at your character sheet, is using ...


0

Make it Real If you want your players to be traumatized, then you need to make them think their characters could die. Stage a fight between 2 champions and have your player character lose. He can be raised by your cleric, but the fact that he can lose, suddenly makes the game much more real. Paralyze the Paladin If you don't want to kill them, handicap ...


0

First, start by giving your players the opportunity to interact with the hopefully rich word around them. If they want to found a college, build constructs, make armor, talk to nobility, or just drink in a bar, give them that opportunity. Have them role play it. Have them buy from the bartender, give them interesting characters to interact with and gossip ...


10

I strongly support the prior answers on how to blend mechanics and role-playing in a way that supports immersion, and makes it easy for the DM and other players to play the game. Stating what you're doing and then role-playing it is very efficient. If you want to promote further role-playing in your group in general, I suggest starting with strategy ...


9

You posed two slightly different questions: A fellow player does not want me to roleplay, what do I do? Short answer: Compromise, see other answers for details. Any way to make him accept roleplaying, or maybe roleplay a bit himself? Short answer: Step 1: Deescalate. Step 2: Ask the group. Step 3: Carefully question his approach, but don't push it. ...


25

Split the Difference Unless your table has an "always in-character" attitude (and even if they do) chances are you've developed some understanding of when something is in character and when it's out of character. You could always try something like: I'm using my fascination ability on the dog. Good dog. Gooood dog. Goooood Doooooog. As a bonus, ...


56

It sounds like your fellow roleplayer just wants you to be verbally clear about what exactly you're doing, mechanically, without just pointing to a thing on your character sheet. It doesn't sound like their problem is necessary that you're roleplaying at all - I'd be pretty surprised if they disliked flavourful descriptions of how people do things. It's ...


2

Did the player roleplay in a way you liked during the session? This particular form of XP reward is designed primarily to act as a subtle form of positive reinforcement to 'train' the players with. The fact that it shows up in the core books of various RPGs also helps keep it from looking like putative behavior on the part of the GM. If your playing with a ...



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