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1

Thales put his finger on both of those approaches right away-- taking actions that directly put your teammates in danger just means that after the fight they'd probably decide to take a piece of you too. If your party members are so weak that your summoner doesn't see damaging them as something to avoid, why would he travel with them? They'd just be ...


3

Roleplaying alignment has always been subjective and something of a contention point among tabletop gamers. How you treat alignment during combat should be a natural extension of how you treat it outside of combat. Here are a few guiding questions I usually use for my characters. How does my alignment affect my relationship with the party? How you view ...


0

A lot of it is practice and experimentation. You can't actually practice by yourself or against bots; you need to be around real live people for it to work. A fast way to practice would be online games of Mafia. Most games are easily won with certain techniques. Go for a more basic game that relies on cunning Mafia. You'll eventually learn to tell the liars ...


13

The "correct" way to play an alignment is often a mire of opinion and self-contradiction. For me, the key aspects of a Neutral Evil character are: They actively wish to cause harm to others. They will prioritise their own minor needs and desires above the happiness and well-being of anyone else. They may follow a specific agenda on how to do harm (based ...


2

As a person who enjoys playing manipulative characters, an advice that hasn't been said, but will complete the other ones. If your character is smarter or more manipulative than you, how can you keep at her level? Time. Think between game sessions. This way you have plenty of time of thinking plots that your characters will think in minutes or seconds of ...


3

The existing answers to this question give good advice on how to achieve the "subtle puppet-master" kind of cunning, the kind of emotional and psychological manipulation that screams of Machiavelli and very personal villains. Cunning doesn't have to be subtle. Subtle is a popular way to play it, sure, but Maid RPG's definition of cunning is broader than ...


2

One small point to consider is that smart people don't have to be effective manipulators. You haven't said anything about requiring that your character's manipulative efforts actually work. I imagine you meant to imply this requirement, and "cunning" does that to some extent too, but one can be cunning, manipulative, and bad at it too. For instance, if ...


4

Remember It's Not You. This is something your character does, not something you have to literally know how to do. Just like how a character with a high math skill does not require the player to solve quadratic equations. Remember that. Remind anyone who needs reminding. Don't drive yourself nuts over literally learning your character's skills. Look for ...


14

Geniuses are Hard It's easy to play a person stronger or faster than you, since we have an objective sense of how to scale up stats. A really agile character is just that- like you, just more agile. But mental stats are a lot trickier. We know what it's like to encounter a smarter/wiser/more charismatic person, but that doesn't tell you how to think or act ...


4

So, in order to add to some already really nice answers, here are my 2 cents on the subject. Take in mind, though, that I'm just like you in this regard- being naïve and well too much honest. So this is gonna be (I hope) a nice place to start. Manipulate them through their wants Every person wants something. Some of us want power, or influence, or true ...


17

I do two things to help me better play my cunning and/or manipulative characters: Read/watch lots of cunning characters in fiction. I grew up watching TV shows like Gargoyles, whose not-quite-villain David Xanatos is the Trope Namer for a whole bunch of tropes related to being cunning. I also read, and still read (yay English), books with cunning ...


6

While it kind of breaks the flow, one way of doing it is to indicate you're speaking out of character (in some fandoms, putting the back of your hand against your forehead signals this) and tell the other player you're being cunning, and what would be a good thing to offer them to trick them into agreeing. Then, run with that.


1

If your player is confused or has questions about the nature of the monster's ability vs its equipment (the net), please reference the Rules Compendium, page 264, "Monsters And Equipment" panel, which explains: If an adventurer gains a monster's equipment, he or she can use it as normal gear. The adventurer does not gain any powers that a monster uses ...


0

In order to adjust for the new player "greenness" I would often have the player make a character roll their intelligence or wit or intuition or what ever is appropriate for the game when they state an uncharacteristic action. "Oh, you want to call the King a moron? Well after succeeding an intelligence roll your training indicates that would be a bad idea ...


2

Another solution to the problem is to turn it into an opportunity for roleplay. Invent a reason why this character is behaving so oddly, hard sci-fi has loads of fantastic options for this, for example: The character is a robot/cyborg/alien who doesn't know who what they are The character is a clone or duplicate human with transplanted memories (Blade ...


3

I hope that I'm not jumping too late on the wagon, but here are my 2 cents on the subject: To make your question short, and to see if I understood it correctly, we're talking about a player who made his character a certain one and roleplays it entirely different. You added that you think that it comes from inexperience, and that he created this character ...


10

You're right, saying "OK, your character's been hit in the head, that's why he's acting strangely" is lame. You should not be rationalizing your PCs' strange behavior like that... ...but your NPCs and other players definitely should! OK, so the company medic, who's always been a dependable Marine, even though his background has some unusual aspects and a ...


0

Don't focus on correct, but on fun People play this game to have fun. Telling others that their ideas or ways to approach the game are wrong leads doesn't seem to increase the enjoyment at the table. You explained that freak characters don't fit into your campaign. Of course that's your prerogative, but don't you think the group might have a better time ...


4

I think the basic problem is that you made him rewrite his character until it matched a character you wanted him to play, rather than what he wanted to play. So on paper he matches your expectation, but it's not actually what he wants to play. It also seems that you set a rather strict set of limitations on character personalities, which might match the game ...


1

I'm not a really experienced DM but there is a method that I use to keep metagaming about the plot to a minimum. Add plot twist when the players are least expecting them, and don't add plot twists when the players are expecting them. Sounds simple, right? My last session was probably the most immersive game I have ever been in. The players went to a ...


1

I think the best way to deal with templates that 'change alignment' is to provide the temptation to alignment change. To have possibilities that a wererat would want to pursue, and give incentives for the player to pursue them. The standard D&D temptation takes the form of a will save, but that is too mechanical. My suggestion: Bonus if they give in, ...



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