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I am assuming that you are creating a character from scratch rather than adding traits to an existing character. The materials that the character might be made out of could be non-standard. The wooden portion could be made from wood infused with dragon blood or replaced with carved dragon bone. Metal plates could have patterns that were etched with a ...


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Fluff wise, your warforged could have been made to replicate some of the dragon capability. If you go for this, especially from character creation, you may be the latest creation of the Lord of Blades, which is famous for having a working,technically the only one, warforged-forge (i don't know the specific name in the english version) and he's working on ...


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Dragonborn of Bahamut The traditional (cheesy) approach is to use the dragonborn template from Races of the Dragon. Dragonborn is an LA +0 acquired template, not inherited, and can apply to warforged. It replaces most racial traits with those of dragonborn. Dragonborn are Humanoid (dragonblood). The fact that dragonborn is an acquired template is what’s ...


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Most ways of obtaining the Dragonblood Subtype involve having a Dragon somewhere is your family-tree. Such is obviously the case with the Half-Dragon template (One parent is a Dragon), the Dragon Heritage feat (Have a draconic heritage, duh) and many others. But the Dragontouched Feat says: You have a trace of draconic power, a result of dragons in your ...


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Yeah, it's a fair question but the answer is, and is likely to remain, there aren't any canon spellcasting chants or anything remotely resembling such, for historical reasons. Basically, people thought that DND involved learning how to actually cast spells, which was not helped by the fact that the early writers did do some anthropological research on ...


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There are no canonical answer to your question in the 5e range of products. There may be something to be found in the Gord the Rogue series by Gary Gygax as Pelor is a Greyhawk deity but that is a lot of research that involve books that are mostly out of print. What I recommend instead it to look towards Fantasy Live Action Roleplaying Games that use ...


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You are the analytical guy - so analytical guy, don't over think this one. A lot of people get wrapped up in the notion that RPGs are 100% theater or story and not simulation. You can easily reset that expectation. At the start of the next game, tell the group that you want to bring back 'old school role playing' into the game, which is more simulationist. ...


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I'm going to offer a couple alternatives that I've seen work very well. First, complaining about a DM/GM is incredibly rude to all involved. Interrupting game play for this nonsense is a simple two strikes rule and she already burned one. Next rant is her last at the table. Second, How she hogs the spotlight makes the difference. Is she in character or ...


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What you, the player, can do on your own. Assuming we're in intiative, let's look at some actions available to you: (Free) Talk. There's a word for this: shouting "parlay!" or "truce!" or even "hold your fire!" can do a lot, especially if you (the player) actually shout it at the table. I've been known (as a GM) to break initiative on this alone. Attack. ...


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A Note This seems to be more of a culture problem more than a rules problem. Lindybeige has a video about this. It seems that RPG players (in general) jump to lethal force too often, and without any form of escalation to that lethal force. Once in combat, it is a race to 0 HP, with the winner suffering death by deadly death, because people have it in their ...


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Here is some notes on how I have handled this in the past. Talking is a free action during combat, assuming the NPC shouts that he does not want to fight and makes a non-threatening stance. As long as the conversation moves toward "lets stop fighting" it probably will. Assuming the PC wants to react, typically what I have seen is the player ready an action ...



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