New answers tagged

0

As well as accents you could consider using dialects where the grammar and vocabulary are a bit modified from standard English. Some of these should be sufficiently familiar that you can drop straight into them, at least enough to make the point, others may need a bit more research or you could develop your own. One example might be dropping in more ...


-1

I'd like to add a suggestion for those not playing face to face. I once played an IRC game featuring one channel for each of in character and out of character chat. To simulate multiple languages, we just used more channels, one for each. Any character who knew a language would join the side channel. This helped RP because players literally couldn't ...


2

Use a name or term of address in the given language when you switch You mention this language is mostly used for communication between 2 party members. In this case, you could simply call each other by your Blurbnish names, or the Blurbnish word for "brother," etc., as you are switching to Blurbnish. Depending on your campaign setting, you might consider ...


0

Piling on to the people suggesting using accents, with just a bit of research and practice it can be both fun and easy to affect even multiple accents. Your rendition of the accent can be terrible, as long as everyone can easily identify which accent you're trying to do. My role-playing group is getting together this weekend, and I think I'm going to use ...


1

How about using a language game? It takes some time to get used, but then you will be able to speak it and understand each other quite fluently. I know this, because we used to play such "language games" back in school.


29

One thing that I have heard very good reports of is this from a larp event called Captain Dick Britton in The Voice Of The Seraph: If you have a skill in a particular language, then you can both speak it, read it, and write it. By default, everyone talks in English. Please adopt whatever accent is appropriate. To speak in German, prefix ...


5

If this private-in-game communication is happening between just two characters, you can make sure to have the players seated beside each other. You can then use any means, which clearly communicate that the characters are addressing one another and actively exclude everyone else. Examples include but are not limited to: Physical contact: One player places ...


4

You can simply speak with an accent that will be associated with the language. However be aware to match the tone of the table, do not choose a silly accent on a serious game.


39

I am afraid that there are no solution that fits all need. All have drawbacks and advantages. Accents, if you can do them, work great. Pick a real life language and use an outrageous accent of the same for your Blurbnish. Clearly, the more outlandish and caricature the accent, the better as long as it fits the tone of the game. If the game is real life, ...


-1

While I sympathize with you in that disruptive behavior can be detrimental to the group dynamics, I just want to point out that the behavior you describe is not necessarily bad behavior. I'll step through each of the behaviors you mentioned in your question. Burning down a pub to stop the flow of polluted beer: I can genuinely imagine a character who would ...


1

The simple answer is "Yes". However, it depends on a number of factors, and especially on the dynamics of your particular group. In greater detail, though, this is actually a fairly complex question, and deserves to be broken down into several different categories. Can a heroic party have evil members? This is an absolute yes. There is nothing in the ...


2

Yes, you can most definitely have an inside man. I typically enjoy a game where one or two of my players is running an inside man plot. But your question is how to make this work, so I'll expand on that. My rules for the inside man are simple: 1) Your goal has to differ from the villains you are chasing. In other words, you can't be secretly working for ...


1

Yes, this can work, but it really only works if the DM is in on it. I've done this once. The party thought my character was a very suboptimal, somewhat clumsy sorcerer with bad luck when it came to spellcasting. In reality, he was a rogue/sorcerer multiclass (which is why powerful spells didn't work: he didn't actually have them at the appropriate ...


4

goal that is different to the party's If you and the DM want to set this up in a way that doesn't ruin the game, then best ensure that although your goal is different from the party's, the situation is not such that only you or the party can achieve your goals, and not both. D&D-3.5 isn't really a PvP game, and so if a member of the party is going ...


3

Yes, this can work! You're right that, if the other players are expecting a fully cooperative game, it would not be fun for you to surprise them with a betrayal. So the way to make this work is to make sure they know in advance that they're not playing a fully cooperative game. One way you could do this would be to just have the GM tell everyone: "Guys, I ...


13

This can work, if your players are experienced roleplayers that don't take story developments personally. I've run various games where the PCs are not "all on the same side." (In fact, there are various RPGs - Amber, Fiasco, Paranoia - who are predicated precisely on that assumption.) Many novels and movies have that exact kind of plot, where the ...


8

If your player's goals and the rest of the party's goals are just fundamentally incompatible-- evil cultist in a group of paladins, agent of Kingdom X in a group dedicated to bringing down Kingdom X, etc-- then you are in no uncertain terms forcing a win-lose dynamic between characters (and therefore very possibly between players) that does not often exist. ...


25

I think the important part of your question is everyone's amusement - that should include the other players. The onus should be on you to make your character work for your play group, not on the play group to fall in line with your character. Does the group know? Do the characters know? It's common courtesy to share your plan for your character. "Slimy ...


-2

I would vote for Magic Jar. It makes the role playing really creative - playing a character using the body of other. Roleplay in roleplay.


-2

Recently, I allowed a player to use create water on a shambling mound made of swampy, mostly watery plant material to cause over 40 HP of damage by causing it to swell up and explode. This was with a party of six 12th level characters finding it difficult to deliver damage to a group of shamblers. The player was pleased to find an otherwise useless low level ...


0

I can't read the answers as I am currently playing (very slowly) the starter game lost mines, and I spotted some spoilers so sorry if i repeat people. If there is someone they really need to talk to, describe them in a little more detail, make them someone of note. Make a joke "remember this isn't a computer game the people don't have question marks over ...



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