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4

It's often useful to remember that your Class is not who or what you are, it's just what you can do. Which is related, but not the same. As the old adage says, "your Class is not your profession". Being a cleric (the noun) doesn't mean you're a miraclemaker magician, and being a Cleric (the class) doesn't mean you're a priest. Being a barbarian doesn't mean ...


-8

Don't give them experience points. After all, they're not gaining experience in being a druid. In the longer term, ask the player what class they actually want to play and switch to that. Alternatively, play a game that isn't based on classes; there are many of them.


2

The D&D rules, the rules of any tabletop RPGs, are tools to be used when adjudicating the actions of players acting as their character in a imagined setting. Many RPGs, including D&D, assume a default setting in order to make it easier to run "out of the box". A common fantasy trope is of the nature priest with special power relating to the natural ...


11

The problem isn’t the player, it’s your overly-narrow concept of “druid” There are no rules for what happens to the player because the player has done nothing wrong. His class is not his character, and he is allowed to play his character however he likes. There can be exceptions if a player is being disruptive, but I don’t see anything in your question that ...


6

I think there's two important things to consider here, to determine the best cause of action. The character's background Has this player written any kind of background for this character that would explain his behaviour and also explains why he is a Druid? This might give you a lot of insight into why he is acting like this. If he does not have a ...


17

Unfortunately there's nothing within the rules that dictates how a Druid must act. Though, the introduction to the class clearly states Druids are also concerned with the delicate ecological balance that sustains plant and animal life, and the need for civilized folk to live in harmony with nature, not in opposition to it. (PHB, pg.65) Druids are also ...


2

Consider how these formidable formians became the dominant predator on their planet- think of it in terms of evolution and what has made them successful. A few things that I can envisage: Immediate chemical communication Hive insects use chemicals to communicate within their colonies. You might retain this literally or you might decide to use another form ...


2

I played a character like this once. She was very young, and had witnessed the (rather brutal) deaths of her parents at an even younger age. As such, she was very hesitant to open up to or trust strangers. And in this particular campaign, even the other PCs were strangers, only having met one another at the onset of the campaign. My character felt confident ...


8

To add on to @mxyzplk's answer (particularly part 2): Be Descriptive You have to remember that (depending on the group/player, of course) a lot of what brings a character's personality out is their dialogue; if your character is shy and you're focusing on the 'quiet-shy' angle of that, you need to make sure that you're bringing out a similar amount of ...


7

Get The GM and Other Players' Buy-In Tell them you're playing a very shy character. In My Little Pony, it's the other ponies that drag Fluttershy into the action a lot of the time, so you need them ready and willing to play that role. You have to not resist so much that they give up on you. And ideally the other PCs are your friends so you "open up" ...


1

Because your DM has blessed this character concept, I'm not going to tell you not to do it, and I'll assume you're all adults (or close enough) who know what they're doing. D&D 3.5e doesn't have native rules for this level of language detail. Modelling degrees of language (in)comprehension is actually quite common in other RPGs with more developed ...


9

You don’t need rules to roleplay your character – this should not be random Just roleplay. Think about what your character hears and how he might misinterpret. Think about some odd phrasings that he might use, as too-direct translations of his own language, using syntax and idioms that Common doesn’t. And use these. Stay in character, and be honest about ...


3

Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 doesn't have something such as that. I may be mistaken, but I doubt it; not including homebrew. The SRD entry for the Speak Language skill says: You don’t make Speak Language checks. You either know a language or you don’t. There is a d20 solution (If I remember correctly) Ravenloft: Masque of the Red Death utilizes ...



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