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60

Rules citations: Animate Dead has the [evil] descriptor. "This is an evil act" is right there in the spell descriptor: Evil: Spells that draw upon evil powers or conjure creatures from evil-aligned planes or with the evil subtype should have the evil descriptor. Good Clerics can't cast [evil] spells: A cleric can't cast spells of an alignment ...


41

Yes! if you perform any standard action (or any other strenuous action) you take 1 point of damage after the completing the act. The rules then go on to explicitly mention the possibility of healing thyself: Unless your activity increased your hit points, you are now at −1 hit points, and you’re dying.


34

They can, sure. But the BD&D rules are quite explicit that they typically have no value. In general, Weapon and armor used by monsters are rarely in good enough condition to sell (BD&D p 42). So they can collect them, they can even use them, but no, merchants won't buy them unless they are particularly pristine.


33

Towering Mountain of Rage Right, you want to to propagate Rage effects throughout a tower of creatures. That's.. actually kind of interesting. Beast Totem chain grants Pounce and 2 Claw attacks, substantially improving the combat prospects of all creatures in the tower. Well, the applicable rules are contained here, Pathfinder's Mounted Combat Rules on ...


32

While I think it's awesome to award experience for in-character behavior, it's also very hard to quantify role playing into experience (how much gets you 100exp?) On top of that, in DnD, exp translates very observably to combat prowess - so it also makes sense to give other types of benefits. Good role playing should give good role-playing benefits. If the ...


31

There are three somewhat-contradicting definitions of True Dragon, from Monster Manual, Draconomicon, and Races of the Dragon (listed by publication date). Please also note my other answer, which poses a rebuttal that I’ve come across. Monster Manual The first definition, in the Monster Manual, is simply the “Dragon, True” entry, which ...


29

Channeling negative energy isn't an Evil action by default the way some other powers are. Negative energy is the power of death, entropy, &c. In D&D3 and Pathfinder, it's often associated with baddies like evil clerics or the undead, but it isn't automatically straight-up capital-E Evil. For example, check the Harm spell, which is, like, the purest ...


29

No. From 3.5 SRD: The Basics – Abilities and Spellcasters: Abilities And Spellcasters The ability that governs bonus spells depends on what type of spellcaster your character is: Intelligence for wizards; Wisdom for clerics, druids, paladins, and rangers; or Charisma for sorcerers and bards. In addition to having a high ability score, a ...


27

There is no such rule in the setting-independent supplements that I know. But setting-specific supplements are another story. Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting, p233 or something: Changing Deities It is possible for a cleric, druid, paladin, or spellcasting ranger (or any other divine spellcaster) to abandon his chosen deity and take up the ...


26

Player's Handbook II (3.5) / Divine Conversion / p193 This is a sidebar at the bottom of the referenced page, which is part of a section on rules for retraining. If you don't have the book, here is the direct quote: DIVINE CONVERSION As noted in the Player’s Handbook, a cleric who grossly violates the code of conduct imposed by his deity loses ...


26

A few folks have mentioned to me that Mike Mearls has stated elsewhere that it's an oversight in the text, and the intent is that a level 1 character should recover 1 hit die. Seems likely errata-fodder. @MrMattFree : Hit dice question! Basic rules say you get half your HD back at a long rest but doesn't say round up. What does a 1st lvl do? ...


25

Flight does indeed require Move Silently checks. (If, of course, you're trying to not make noise.) This is backed up in the rules by the entry for Giant Owl, which states: When in flight, giant owls gain a +8 bonus on Move Silently checks.


24

Just ban it or change it The Candle of Invocation is a broken item. It should not exist, at least not at that price. The rules as written make it the single fastest way to break a campaign into itty bitty pieces. So in short, no, the Candle of Invocation cannot be allowed to work as written without becoming an exploit. I don't like the retribution angle, ...


24

The caster level (CL) is set by the creator of the potion, as per Brew Potion: When you create a potion, you set the caster level, which must be sufficient to cast the spell in question and no higher than your own level. If you don't know it, the general rule of thumb is to use the minimum caster level required to cast the spell (as that's the ...


23

Feat prerequisite with do not care about what class you took at the level you gained them, only that you have the feature. Once your character has the Rage power feature from barbarian he is always considered to have it and therefore fulfills the prerequisite; He doesn't loose it by taking a level in another class. MrLemon said it very well in the comments ...


22

Abstractions are leaky, full stop In the software world, there's something called the Law of Leaky Abstractions: All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky. The basic idea is that abstractions hide details, but sometimes those details are important, so pretty much every abstraction will require us to "break it down" and look deeper ...


22

Apply the (1/2) multiplier to the paladin level only. Your example paladin can use Lay on Hands 6 times per day. This is consistent with mathematical order of operations; in 0.5 * <paladin level> + <CHA>, you only apply the multiplication to the paladin level. In order to indicate an equation such as 0.5 * (<paladin level> + <CHA>), ...


20

There is no rule that says that flying allows you to move silently. The entry for Move Silently simply says that you move, it doesn't say how. You're dealing with noise issues such as the rustle of clothing and the creaking of equipment, as well as your own ability to step silently and not breathe loudly. That said, some of the terrain modifiers wouldn't ...


20

Yes, you can target yourself. However, note that multiple castings do not stack. It’s a same-source issue; you can’t keep casting the spell to get more. So you get 1d6/2 levels worth of HP (average 1.75/level, which won’t approach the cap unless you are badly hurt and have very low Constitution), which is poor compared to false ...


20

No rules such as those you describe exist within D&D 3.5. There is no limit to how high any ability score can get. I obviously can't know where you got the idea from, but here are some possibilities: An overeager interpretation of the point buy rules (Dungeon Master's Guide page 169), which do not allow a character to buy a base score of more than 18 ...


19

I've never seen any "official" guidelines, but in my group we handed out 1-2 poker chips to each player. Throughout the session, they could give those chips to any player that had an instance of exceptional role playing. At the end of the session players could hand in their chips (only those received from other players, not those given to them at the start ...


19

Everybody needs a martial weapon proficiency The shield bash rules say this (emphasis mine): You can bash an opponent with a light shield or heavy shield, using it as an off-hand weapon. See Table: Weapons for the damage dealt by a shield bash. Used this way, a shield is a martial bludgeoning weapon. For the purpose of penalties on attack rolls, ...


19

Yeah, there's no reason that can't be improvised. The classic would be scooping up and flinging sand in your opponent's eyes, which would in most situations* be Dexterity versus Dexterity. Another classic (but slightly more cinematic, so possibly with Disadvantage with non-cinematic DMs) method of blinding an opponent is grabbing their shirt or cloak and ...


18

There is a +1 to the DC for perception when trying to see something for every 10 feet away it is from you. Therefore, you have a chance to see things that are less than 200 + 10*perception modifier feet away; if things are more than 100+10*perception feet away, you can't see them by taking 10, so that's about when I'd be rolling to see things. Of course, ...


18

Whichever comes first. PHB, page 203, Spellcasting, Duration, Concentration If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears in its Duration entry, and the spell specifies how long you can concentrate on it. The duration listed is the maximum allowed amount of time one can concentrate on that spell. In my interpretation, this ...


18

A flaming or flaming burst weapon can deal 1d6 fire damage on a hit, if that feature has been activated. Fire damage by-passes a troll’s Regeneration, dealing lethal damage and eliminating the healing for a turn. Setting it on fire is not necessary to damage a troll. On the other hand, fire damage does not automatically start a fire; for the most ...


17

Through inference, there is no action cost for controlling facing. The SRD presents a combat facing "add-on" that states: The standard d20 combat rules intentionally ignore the direction a creature faces. The rules assume that creatures are constantly moving and shifting within their spaces, looking in all directions during a fight. In this variant, ...


17

You can charge as may things as you want, provided you're in the right condition (enough distance, no obstacles on your path) and you have enough time to do the action (with a belt of battle or on a high-level factotum you could do it even twice in a round). I can remember 3e's pounce ability (which was activated on a charge) worked only during the first ...


17

Use a Wisdom check. Ability Checks Sometimes a character tries to do something to which no specific skill really applies. In these cases, you make an ability check. An ability check is a roll of 1d20 plus the appropriate ability modifier. Essentially, you’re making an untrained skill check.


17

Arcane Mark It's not extra-fancy, but it can produce six-symbol codes (ANY kind of symbols) which are invisible to the naked eye but readable by anyone with read magic-- though personally, I'm not sure why the marks should be invisible: a large part of preventing theft is making the theft-prevention measures obvious. The contract itself probably can't be ...



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