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24

I have experience playing the low levels. I can briefly summarise the impact as follows: It will make encounters much harder. With many characters dying in combat, and possibly a few total party kills as well. This can be demoralising, but some players might be up for it. But something perhaps easily overlooked is that it removes a wonderful suspense ...


13

At 1st level, a single critical hit from all but the weakest monster can reduce a PC to 0 HP. For example, kobolds (CR 1/8) do 1d4+2; that's a maximum of 10 on a critical, fighter types should survive - most others are at 0. Hobgoblins (CR 1/2) do 1d8+1 plus 2d6 if an ally is within 5 feet of the target, an average of 25 and a maximum of 41 on a critical; ...


3

Depends Every DM is different. If you are good on your feet and take naturally to story creation, minimal prep is necessary and you pull almost everything out of the air. I learned I need prep, but too much prep for me leads to me wanting to railroad. So, sketches of what might be rather than what the players will do. For instance, when I was brand new ...


3

There's an overall balance factor between HP and death saves. Removing the death saves really makes the PCs HP quite low. Monsters tend to get a higher relative HP because we don't really expect them to use Hit Dice on short rests. When a player gets to zero HP, we expect to have a round or two to heal them or just finish the fight and let them spend Hit ...


1

Level difference is a dangerously big factor. It's been a few years1 since I played Basic and Expert D&D (We never reached Companion/Expert level in our games) but similarly to most other versions of (A)D&D a few levels difference can bring a massive power change. The Magic User and Cleric classes especially have some fearsome spells by character ...



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