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32

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when ...


27

You are misunderstanding a vital element of the rules. There are not two different kind of saves. What you're reading as "Spell Save" is actually "Spell Save DC". It is used to calculate the save difficulty of spells casts by your character. Spell save difficulties are not set by the DM. When you cast a spell that calls for the target to make a saving ...


21

In OD&D, I can't find much clarity as to the effects of invisibility at all. In BECMI, you have a -6 penalty to hit an invisible defender. And you can't see them. The rest is up to you. Don't see any impact on saving throws. (That -6 may be from the Rules Cyclopedia). In 1e, you have a -4 penalty to hit an invisible creature and have to detect them ...


21

No. The Player's Handbook 2, page 219 has this to say on the matter (emphasis mine): Failed Saving Throw: Sometimes an effect changes as a target fails saving throws against it. The new effect, specified in a “First Failed Saving Throw” or a “Second Failed Saving Throw” entry, takes effect after the target fails a saving throw against the previous ...


21

Yes, the Halfling racial feature Lucky works with death saving throws. Whenever you start your turn with 0 hit points, you must make a special saving throw, called a death saving throw, to determine whether you creep closer to death or hang onto life. Unlike other saving throws, this one isn’t tied to any ability score. You are in the hands of ...


20

Wands follow the general rules for Saving Throws Against Magic Item Powers on the page on magic items (emphasis mine): Saving Throws Against Magic Item Powers Magic items produce spells or spell-like effects. For a saving throw against a spell or spell-like effect from a magic item, the DC is 10 + the level of the spell or effect + the ability ...


19

An effect like the one you describe (permanent, bound to a structure) is defined in the Stronghold Builder's Guidebook, pages 77-78. The component is appropriately named "Hall of Truth". It enforces a save upon each entry into the chamber. The relevant text is: [The Zone of Truth] effect only lasts as long as the subject is in the space. If a subject ...


19

Your reading is correct, PCs have to make a save against every harpy's song individually. You've already quoted the relevant line: A target that successfully saves is immune to this harpy's song for the next 24 hours. It says "this harpy's song" specifically, not just "harpy's song" or even "this ability". And given the note about other harpy songs ...


18

There is no option to skip saving throws at the end of your turn. From the Rules Compendium pg 228 If a creature is subject to an effect that a save can end, the creature makes a saving throw against that effect at the end of each of its turns. DDI words it thusly End of Turn: At the end of your turn, you make a saving throw against each effect on ...


18

Effectively, yes. The source of confusion is likely a gut reaction against the idea of stacking the same bonus with itself. However, that's not what's happening here. The paladin is not getting their Charisma modifier twice: they're getting their Charisma modifier once, and also getting a different bonus that just so happens to often (but not always) be the ...


18

The definition of Uncanny Dodge covers this for you: Uncanny Dodge Starting at 5th level, when an attacker that you can see hits you with an attack, you can use your reaction to halve the attack’s damage against you. Fireball is not an attack anymore than spike growth is. This is supported in the PHB pg. 195: If there’s ever any question ...


17

According to a very strict interpretation (my interpretation, in this case, obviously) of the RAW, sure, the warrior can choose to save against the Wound spell. Here's why: Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw: A creature can voluntarily forego a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. – Pathfinder, Saving Throw Emphasis mine. The ...


17

Six saving throws instead of three is by design, intended to emphasize the ability scores, and new usages are likely to come up in future expansions. Why Associating saving throws with ability scores makes the scores more relevant, or at least come up a lot more often. It has been six saving throws since the first playtest rules. Quoting the transcript of ...


16

As you say, this is how Green Slime is presented in the DMG (3.5e p77, 3.0 p117). Note that Green Slime is considered a hazard, much like a flow of lava, raging river, or 40' pit would be a hazard. Green slime is green slime. Does the module say the slime is invisible? That the players can't see it? Is there an illusory wall or darkness spell concealing ...


16

Unless the effect says to make a saving throw immediately, as when avoiding being pushed into a pit or something, a creature makes saving throws at the end of its turn for each of the effects that a save can end. (Rules Compendium, page 228). In this case, your spell would go into effect on your attack, and at the end of the other PCs turn, he'd get to make ...


16

You take 1/4 the total damage. You are looking at two separate events. The first event is whether or not you are hit with the 'full force' of the attack (your saving throw determines this). You can think of it like diving out of the way of a fireball, or ducking under a column of ice. If you pass the saving throw, you take half (you successfully avoided ...


15

It was explicitly addressed on pg 219 of PHB2 (and in the Rules Compendium page 98 ): Failed Saving Throw: Sometimes an effect changes as a target fails saving throws against it. The new effect, specified in a “First Failed Saving Throw” or a “Second Failed Saving Throw” entry, takes effect after the target fails a saving throw against ...


15

From the DMG/Compendium, the important part for your question: Forced Movement and Terrain Difficult Terrain: Forced movement isn’t hindered by difficult terrain. Blocking Terrain: Forced movement can’t move a creature through blocking terrain (page 61). Every square along the path must be a space the creature could normally occupy. ...


15

Standard Scheme You are correct. Read the base save of a Barbarian 3, base save of a Bard 6, and add them. Factional BAB & Saves: Variant Suggestion I strongly recommend, however, that you use the “fractional” variant. In 3.5 that’s in Unearthed Arcana; I don’t know if Pathfinder replicated it anywhere, but saves work the same ...


15

The list of proficiencies you gain when multiclassing are listed on page 164 of the players handbook. They do have several examples of classes that grant non combat based proficiencies. Rogues, Rangers, and bards all give a skill or tool proficiency. Saving throw proficiencies, however, are not mentioned on any of the character class entries, and due to how ...


14

All of it. But it may end up squeezing if they are partially over the pit. If only part of a creature's space is over a pit or precipice, the creature doesn't fall (Normally a creature ends up in such a position as a result of forced movement.) On the creature's next turn, it must either move to an unoccupied space that is at least as large as it is or ...


14

5e has changed Dying in a few meaningful ways from 4e's Death Saving Throw mechanic: Death saving throws are now 3 successes before 3 failures. If you get to 3 successes, you're stable, but still unconscious. If you get to 3 failures, you die. If you get to stable, all of your death saves are reset (successes and failures). If any damage you would take ...


13

A failed save means the target has no idea that the effect has taken place. A successful save gives the target an idea that they’ve been targeted by a hostile mental effect, but beyond its hostility and the fact that they resisted it, they gain no more information (i.e. no indication of the source, the direction it came from, the nature of the attack, ...


13

This isn't an oversight. Spells aren't the only thing that could possibly cause a saving throw. Saving throws are written to be generally applicable, so that they can cover every possible situation and future rule. This provided a solid foundation upon which both official rules and home rulings can build, as it provides for making saving throws against any ...


13

You are overthinking this especially since it's backstory, not a real situation in play. A 17th level wizard has a +10 Will save base. (He loses a level from the rez, but it's still +10.) That's a 25% chance to fail the DC 15 Will save, assuming he's not super wise (most wizards that embrace lichdom aren't). So... He failed it! Done and done. You're ...


13

As you've noticed, the key sentence to deconstruct is the last one. In either case, both the object and the creature or solid surface take 3d8 bludgeoning damage. "In either case" refers to the case where the projectile is stopped by "stopping early if it impacts against a solid surface" versus the case where it is stopped by "the object strikes the ...


12

There's a limited amount you can do proactively to prevent this. The fact that your int save isn't going to be very good is pretty much a fact of life. If you're targeted by this spell, there's a really good chance you're going to get hit with it. You can take a starting class as something that gets proficiency, but that may not fit every build (and it's a ...


12

You are correct. Spell saves are 10 + spell level + spellcasting stat modifier (+ any miscellaneous bonuses). They don't go up directly with character level, except insasmuch as character level lets you cast higher level spells, get higher stats, and get feat like Spell Focus that boost your DCs. As you become a higher level caster you need to either ...


12

The chapter on Spellcasting answers this question: The DC to resist one of your spells equals 8 + your spellcasting ability modifier + your proficiency bonus + any special modifiers. So for example, the DC of a Poison Spray cast by a level 1 Wizard with 16 Intelligence is: 8 + 3 (Int mod) + 2 (proficiency bonus) = 13


11

Can a creature willingly forego a saving throw versus a spell? If the creature is targeted by a spell that allows a saving throw, the creature can choose to fail that saving throw. Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw A creature can voluntarily forego a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. Even a character with a special resistance to ...



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