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19

In OD&D, I can't find much clarity as to the effects of invisibility at all. In BECMI, you have a -6 penalty to hit an invisible defender. And you can't see them. The rest is up to you. Don't see any impact on saving throws. (That -6 may be from the Rules Cyclopedia). In 1e, you have a -4 penalty to hit an invisible creature and have to detect them ...


18

There is no option to skip saving throws at the end of your turn. From the Rules Compendium pg 228 If a creature is subject to an effect that a save can end, the creature makes a saving throw against that effect at the end of each of its turns. DDI words it thusly End of Turn: At the end of your turn, you make a saving throw against each effect on ...


16

Unless the effect says to make a saving throw immediately, as when avoiding being pushed into a pit or something, a creature makes saving throws at the end of its turn for each of the effects that a save can end. (Rules Compendium, page 228). In this case, your spell would go into effect on your attack, and at the end of the other PCs turn, he'd get to make ...


14

As you say, this is how Green Slime is presented in the DMG (3.5e p77, 3.0 p117). Note that Green Slime is considered a hazard, much like a flow of lava, raging river, or 40' pit would be a hazard. Green slime is green slime. Does the module say the slime is invisible? That the players can't see it? Is there an illusory wall or darkness spell concealing ...


14

All of it. But it may end up squeezing if they are partially over the pit. If only part of a creature's space is over a pit or precipice, the creature doesn't fall (Normally a creature ends up in such a position as a result of forced movement.) On the creature's next turn, it must either move to an unoccupied space that is at least as large as it is or ...


14

According to a very strict interpretation (my interpretation, in this case, obviously) of the RAW, sure, the warrior can choose to save against the Wound spell. Here's why: Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw: A creature can voluntarily forego a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. – Pathfinder, Saving Throw Emphasis mine. The ...


14

An effect like the one you describe (permanent, bound to a structure) is defined in the Stronghold Builder's Guidebook, pages 77-78. The component is appropriately named "Hall of Truth". It enforces a save upon each entry into the chamber. The relevant text is: [The Zone of Truth] effect only lasts as long as the subject is in the space. If a subject ...


14

Six saving throws instead of three is by design, intended to emphasize the ability scores, and new usages are likely to come up in future expansions. Why Associating saving throws with ability scores makes the scores more relevant, or at least come up a lot more often. It has been six saving throws since the first playtest rules. Quoting the transcript of ...


13

It was explicitly addressed on pg 219 of PHB2 (and in the Rules Compendium page 98 ): Failed Saving Throw: Sometimes an effect changes as a target fails saving throws against it. The new effect, specified in a “First Failed Saving Throw” or a “Second Failed Saving Throw” entry, takes effect after the target fails a saving throw against ...


12

5e has changed Dying in a few meaningful ways from 4e's Death Saving Throw mechanic: Death saving throws are now 3 successes before 3 failures. If you get to 3 successes, you're stable, but still unconscious. If you get to 3 failures, you die. If you get to stable, all of your death saves are reset (successes and failures). If any damage you would take ...


12

This isn't an oversight. Spells aren't the only thing that could possibly cause a saving throw. Saving throws are written to be generally applicable, so that they can cover every possible situation and future rule. This provided a solid foundation upon which both official rules and home rulings can build, as it provides for making saving throws against any ...


11

A failed save means the target has no idea that the effect has taken place. A successful save gives the target an idea that they’ve been targeted by a hostile mental effect, but beyond its hostility and the fact that they resisted it, they gain no more information (i.e. no indication of the source, the direction it came from, the nature of the attack, ...


11

From the DMG/Compendium, the important part for your question: Forced Movement and Terrain Difficult Terrain: Forced movement isn’t hindered by difficult terrain. Blocking Terrain: Forced movement can’t move a creature through blocking terrain (page 61). Every square along the path must be a space the creature could normally occupy. ...


10

Standard Scheme You are correct. Read the base save of a Barbarian 3, base save of a Bard 6, and add them. Factional BAB & Saves: Variant Suggestion I strongly recommend, however, that you use the “fractional” variant. In 3.5 that’s in Unearthed Arcana; I don’t know if Pathfinder replicated it anywhere, but saves work the same ...


10

Can a creature willingly forego a saving throw versus a spell? If the creature is targeted by a spell that allows a saving throw, the creature can choose to fail that saving throw. Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw A creature can voluntarily forego a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. Even a character with a special resistance to ...


9

D&D4 answers only here. There is no save vs. falling damage directly. However there are a couple helpful things to remember. Training in Acrobatics DDI can reduce the falling damage you take: If you fall from a height, you can make an Acrobatics check to reduce the amount of falling damage you take. You do get a save when forced into a falling ...


9

No, Assuming the power used was Summon Thought Servant DDI, it works exactly like a Heal check. Opportunity Action: Triggered when a dying ally adjacent to the servant starts its turn; targets the triggering ally; the servant makes a Heal check to stabilize the target or to allow the target to use his or her second wind In a Heal check, the subject is ...


9

There is no precedent in the rules for it to matter, so I doubt any rule addresses it. You are using a new mechanic, so create rules for it. Even if there is some RAW that defines the general case, people probably don't know it, since this is super obscure. So just give a specific rule in the effect for what you want to happen in this case, and also in the ...


9

Since you’re doing something the rules don’t cover, there is no rule that tells you one way or the other how it’s “supposed” to go – it’s up to you. I would recommend not having it be a single save ever, since that would mean someone who makes the save never has to worry about that effect ever again, while someone who does not can never break it. ...


8

There's nothing in the rules that mentions any sharing of reflex saves between mount and rider. Each rolls a separate reflex save. Unless it's stated specifically, a mount and rider do not share any abilities such as Evasion with each other, either. To address the issue of realism clashing with the game rules, I don't think this is out of bounds with ...


8

Yes From the Rules Compendium, p260 (emphasis mine): Death Saving Throw: When an adventurer is dying, make a saving throw at the end of that character's turn each round. A death saving throw works just like any other saving throw, but the result determines how close the adventurer is to death. If you get a bonus to all saving throws, that bonus does ...


8

To address your first question, Why is this trap so special and hardcore - and one of the very first one in the dungeon, no less? Think of the alternative. If the first few traps the players encounter are easily avoidable, or can be shrugged off without too much effort, that sets the tone for the rest of the dungeon. The paradigm becomes one of "Move ...


8

@Kryan hit the nail on the perverbial head, however, there is another aspect not yet addressed. A sucessfull Skill: Spellcraft check of 25+spell level allows the character who made a saving throw against them to determine what the spell was. Note that this doesn't say they are required to see the caster casting the spell only make a saving throw. ...


8

Think back to the last time (or any time) you remember someone casting a healing spell. Did you say that you're voluntarily failing your save? By RAW, that's what is happening. It's harmless, so you can choose to fail it. Everyone just assumes that you are automatically, because making people actually say that every time sucks. What happens if you forget ...


8

No Order of Operations Exists... These are rules you'll have write. It's unfortunate in d20 that there's no quantified step-by-step order for combat and applying effects a la most trading card games. Were there, we could just say, "Immunity applies during step X, Damage Resolution, after Saving Throws but before Inflicting Effects," or whatever. ...But If ...


8

The PC Gets a Save There is no effect line in 5e's magic spells, so when it says affects another creature its not calling to a mechanical keyword, but saying it shifts target. Spell Reflection is basically used to turn the party's spells against them, but a targeted PC should still get to make the normal save as if he/she was the original target of the ...


7

Yes If players remain in the pool of poisonous blood the will take the 1d10 + 5 ongoing damage every turn they remain in the pool. The ongoing damage will not stack (same source, same amount), but they will get a save against the ongoing damage every turn, at the end of their turn. This is because a player can end their turn in the pool, save vs the poison ...


7

Each potentially affected creature is allowed a save to avoid the effects when the spell is cast or when the creature first enters the emanation area. Your quote has the answer! So, when the spell is cast, everyone in range gets a saving throw. Furthermore, whenever someone enters the temple, they get another saving throw since they are at that moment ...


7

By default, the way you do this is with a level-by-level approach: Scout 1 (+0/+2/+0) // Ranger 1 (+2/+2/+0) = +2/+2/+0 Scout 2 (+0/+1/+0) // Swashbuckler 1 (+2/+0/+0) = +2/+1/+0 (total: +4/+3/+0) Scout 3 (+1/+0/+1) // Swashbuckler 2 (+1/+0/=0) = +1/+0/+1 (total: +5/+3/+1) Scout 4 (+0/+1/+0) // Rogue 1 (+0/+2/+0) = +0/+2/+0 (total: ...


6

AD&D1e PHB Page 105 Falling Damage only says 1d6 for each 10' of distance fallen to a maximum of 20d6, plus or minus adjustments for the surface fallen upon. AD&D1e DMG Page 80 Saving Throws Yet because the player character is all-important, he or she must always-- or nearly always - have a chance, no matter how small, a chance ...



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