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30

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when ...


26

You are misunderstanding a vital element of the rules. There are not two different kind of saves. What you're reading as "Spell Save" is actually "Spell Save DC". It is used to calculate the save difficulty of spells casts by your character. Spell save difficulties are not set by the DM. When you cast a spell that calls for the target to make a saving ...


20

No. The Player's Handbook 2, page 219 has this to say on the matter (emphasis mine): Failed Saving Throw: Sometimes an effect changes as a target fails saving throws against it. The new effect, specified in a “First Failed Saving Throw” or a “Second Failed Saving Throw” entry, takes effect after the target fails a saving throw against the previous ...


18

Effectively, yes. The source of confusion is likely a gut reaction against the idea of stacking the same bonus with itself. However, that's not what's happening here. The paladin is not getting their Charisma modifier twice: they're getting their Charisma modifier once, and also getting a different bonus that just so happens to often (but not always) be the ...


14

The list of proficiencies you gain when multiclassing are listed on page 164 of the players handbook. They do have several examples of classes that grant non combat based proficiencies. Rogues, Rangers, and bards all give a skill or tool proficiency. Saving throw proficiencies, however, are not mentioned on any of the character class entries, and due to how ...


12

There's a limited amount you can do proactively to prevent this. The fact that your int save isn't going to be very good is pretty much a fact of life. If you're targeted by this spell, there's a really good chance you're going to get hit with it. You can take a starting class as something that gets proficiency, but that may not fit every build (and it's a ...


12

You are correct. Spell saves are 10 + spell level + spellcasting stat modifier (+ any miscellaneous bonuses). They don't go up directly with character level, except insasmuch as character level lets you cast higher level spells, get higher stats, and get feat like Spell Focus that boost your DCs. As you become a higher level caster you need to either ...


9

The term "special modifiers" applies to any bonus to the DC of your spells that is not your spellcasting ability modifier or your proficiency bonus. Examples of this kind of bonus include the +2 bonus given by a Robe of the Archmagi or the +1, +2, or +3 bonus given by a Rod of the Pact Keeper.


9

Hypnotic Pattern has no impact on a saving throw whatsoever. It imposes both the Charmed and Incapacitated conditions and having a speed of 0 does not automatically impose the immobilized, paralyzed, restrained, or stunned conditions, it just means you have a speed of 0. In fact, immobilized isn't even a condition in 5e. Rules for saving throws can be found ...


9

Assuming you are vulnerable to 8th level spells (meaning no 9th level Globe of Invulnerability), the only way to prevent the Ability Drain effect from Feeblemind is to succeed on the Intelligence saving throw. There are several ways to improve your Intelligence saving throws. Here is an attempt at an exhaustive list in ascending order of inconvenience ...


8

1. Don't play D&D alone. No one character can be proof against everything. Even without digging in the whole ruleset, I think it's fairly likely that there are various attacks which hit the Int-based casters particularly hard too. If you're playing with a balanced party, they'll have your back. Specifically, The spell can also be ended by greater ...


8

The PC Gets a Save There is no effect line in 5e's magic spells, so when it says affects another creature its not calling to a mechanical keyword, but saying it shifts target. Spell Reflection is basically used to turn the party's spells against them, but a targeted PC should still get to make the normal save as if he/she was the original target of the ...


8

PFSRD: ...the DC to save against these revelations is equal to 10 + 1/2 the oracle’s level + the oracle’s Charisma modifier. Because the revelation is a supernatural ability, not a spell or spell-like ability, spell level doesn't apply. If another effect needs to refer to spell level for some reason (it happens very rarely), a suggested houserule is ...


8

Those numbers are your overall modifier for that skill or saving throw. They include your proficiency bonus if you are proficient in them, otherwise they are just your ability modifier for that skill or saving throw. They're pre-calculated and listed on the sheet for convenience during the game so that you don't have to add up all your modifiers and ...


7

My first reaction would be to say no... but after reading the text of Aura of Protection, indeed that would be the case: yes, you add your Charisma modifier twice to the die roll on Charisma saving throws. The first time you add it, its in the form of an ability modifier, and the second is a bonus modifier. What might get people confused is that the rules ...


7

This is left completely to DM discretion. The rules do not define when or if a creature in the fiction knows whether or not a save was succeeded. As such, it is up to the DM to determine whether a creature knows when it's relevant. Normally it's pretty obvious whether or not a spell worked, but when it's not (say a mind control spell where the creature ...


7

As long as it is internally consistent, then there is no error. When you build a monster, you pick the Proficiency bonus, attacks, defense, etc. Then based on those, the CR is set. According to the DM's guild the CR has nothing to do with the Proficiency Bonus, but rather the average of the offensive and defensive equivalent CRs. The DM's guide has some ...


6

Disadvantage from the Hex spell1 applies only to ability checks. The Player's Basic Rules and Player's Handbook differentiate ability checks from saving throws and attack rolls from ability checks in Chapter 7: Using Ability Scores. Specifically, The three main rolls of the game—the ability check, the saving throw, and the attack roll—rely on the six ...


6

The DC for a saving throw against a spell is 10 + the spell level + the caster's casting stat modifier + any other bonuses, such as the spell focus feat . This is stated in the class descriptions of each class that can cast spells. Flaming Sphere is no exception and I can't see why you'd think it would be. For example, if the spell was cast by a Wizard with ...


5

No. There is no specific way to pass on or intentionally fail a saving throw given. You don’t normally decide to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm. (BD&D 62). I'd take this to mean that you're forced to make the saving throw even if you'd rather decline it (that's not quite the ...


5

I don't see a rule which allows you to intentionally fail a saving throw, except for the nebulous language of "don't normally decide to make a saving throw" on page 179 of the PH, or "a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of spell's effects" on page 205 (emphasis added). That wording leaves a lot of room for interpretation at the individual ...


5

It's the same reason why things like "defending yourself from being attacked" don't take away your action. They are assumed to be occurring in the process of fighting and are abstracted out of the combat system.


5

Although contests are RAW, how to run a contests is explicitly made the DM's responsibility via their own good judgment of the specific situation at hand. That means that, RAW, as soon as a contest is on the table (so to speak), it's in the DM's hands to make any and all adjustments necessary for it to make sense. In this way, the rules are — again, by RAW ...


4

According PHB 173, ability check, saving throw and attack are threatened different: Sometimes a special ability or spell tells you that you have advantage or disadvantage on an ability check, a saving throw, or an attack roll. So, the Hex Spell only cause disadvantage in ability checks (PHB 251). Also, choose one ability when you cast the ...


4

Since you are a Dragonborn, you are using the Player's HandBook (PHB). Nearly every one of your questions is clearly explained in various parts of the character creation process, so please read through that. However, I'll give you a broad overview of what those things on the character sheet do to hopefully point you in the right direction. Inspiration is ...


3

There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says: You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm. This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a ...


3

The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity saving throws. versus contested by the target’s Strength (Athletics) or Dexterity (Acrobatics) check A saving throw is not a check. The condition means they fail saving throws it has no impact on checks. Being incapacitated prevents them taking actions and reactions; opposing your action is ...


3

Honestly, I would say a stunned character could still resist a grapple. Stunned isn't unconscious or unable to move one's muscles, it is a momentary bout of daze coming from a blow to the head or a flash bang effect. The character may not be able to initiate a grapple, resisting one takes a lot less ordination. I could however see a DM adjudicating that a ...


3

RAW, no. It's not quite true to just say it's up to DM discretion - everything is, of course, but since the rules don't say that you get spell-save ESP, then by default you don't. Also, by historical analogy to the earlier games 5e is more like (especially AD&D 1e/2e), no. The approach to spells in those was very cut and dried, they do what they do and ...


3

Have Your Opponent Cower Before You Scaring the bejesus out of someone doesn't consider their Armor Class as a means of defense. Getting a way to make them frozen solid from fear would render many armor classes much lower. A half-orc with half-orc paragon is really good with intimidation. They get Rage without having to be a barbarian, and get a +4 to ...



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