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In our games, killing a high level character with a single scroll is a way of saying "Really? Did you even try to think things through". This is because: 1) spell turning 2) your spells tend to be much higher CL than castings from a scroll, and the defensive capabilities of appropriate enemies reflect this 3) scrolls are incredibly cheap. You should ...


-1

To be honest, I don't think there's a right or wrong answer to give you here. One of the aspects of DnD is that if a rule doesn't fit well then a DM is given full authority to make his/her own decisions. As the rules have been built up over many years you can expect some not to have been officially recognized as problematic and re-written to be a bit ...


3

I don't see a rule which allows you to intentionally fail a saving throw, except for the nebulous language of "don't normally decide to make a saving throw" on page 179 of the PH, or "a target can make a saving throw to avoid some or all of spell's effects" on page 205 (emphasis added). That wording leaves a lot of room for interpretation at the individual ...


2

I don't have access to the RAW at the moment, so someone may be able to provide a more definitive answer than myself. If we're going for a purely RAW answer, I would probably side with "No, you can't generally choose to fail saves as there are specific allowances for that choice in certain spells, indicating that that is not normally the case". However, ...


4

No. There is no specific way to pass on or intentionally fail a saving throw given. You don’t normally decide to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm. (BD&D 62). I'd take this to mean that you're forced to make the saving throw even if you'd rather decline it (that's not quite the ...


3

There are 3 possibilities here.The first is that saving throws in general can be voluntarily failed. The text on page 179 of the PHB says: You don't normally choose to make a saving throw; you are forced to make one because your character or monster is at risk of harm. This says that you can't normally choose to make a saving throw. Choosing to fail a ...


25

In general, you worry about DC, Saving throws, and AC only in situations where there are two opposing views of what should or can happen. Unless you have some sort of magical shield which actually has a chance to prevent the magic from happening, (Like a partial anti-magic sphere or something) there is no reason to ask someone to roll a saving throw when ...


3

Spending resources (Feats, Ability Points, etc.) to defend against this will likely cripple your character. My suggestion is to play your characters strengths, not its weaknesses. If you absolutely must have some way of defending against it or making it less effective, you have options, but they're costly. Run If you get hit, get out of Dodge. You should ...


8

Assuming you are vulnerable to 8th level spells (meaning no 9th level Globe of Invulnerability), the only way to prevent the Ability Drain effect from Feeblemind is to succeed on the Intelligence saving throw. There are several ways to improve your Intelligence saving throws. Here is an attempt at an exhaustive list in ascending order of inconvenience ...


8

1. Don't play D&D alone. No one character can be proof against everything. Even without digging in the whole ruleset, I think it's fairly likely that there are various attacks which hit the Int-based casters particularly hard too. If you're playing with a balanced party, they'll have your back. Specifically, The spell can also be ended by greater ...


13

There's a limited amount you can do proactively to prevent this. The fact that your int save isn't going to be very good is pretty much a fact of life. If you're targeted by this spell, there's a really good chance you're going to get hit with it. You can take a starting class as something that gets proficiency, but that may not fit every build (and it's a ...



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