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1

Saving throws are in no way limited to spells or poison. According to the definition, any threat that is not an attack (because that targets AC) could call for a saving throw. For instance: let's say the thief fell into a pit trap and the fighter is grabbing his hand and trying to pull him up. If a tentacle brutally grabs the thief and try to pull down, I ...


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Six saving throws instead of three is by design, intended to emphasize the ability scores, and new usages are likely to come up in future expansions. Why Associating saving throws with ability scores makes the scores more relevant, or at least come up a lot more often. It has been six saving throws since the first playtest rules. Quoting the transcript of ...


12

This isn't an oversight. Spells aren't the only thing that could possibly cause a saving throw. Saving throws are written to be generally applicable, so that they can cover every possible situation and future rule. This provided a solid foundation upon which both official rules and home rulings can build, as it provides for making saving throws against any ...


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5e has changed Dying in a few meaningful ways from 4e's Death Saving Throw mechanic: Death saving throws are now 3 successes before 3 failures. If you get to 3 successes, you're stable, but still unconscious. If you get to 3 failures, you die. If you get to stable, all of your death saves are reset (successes and failures). If any damage you would take ...


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At three successful saves, you stabilise and stop rolling death saves and erase any failures and the successes you've racked up. You're still unconscious, but not dying anymore, and will wake with 1 hp after some time. Erasing failures when you stabilise is so that you start the count fresh in case you de-stabilise (which can happen if you take more damage ...


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I always consider the (harmless) and (object) tags to be part of the spell itself. For example, undead are immune to any effect that requires a Fortitude save unless it has either of those tags. This means that the tags are inherent to the spell. So since you can choose to forgo a save we already know that a character knows that a spell is cast on them. ...


1

My interpretation At my tables, I have never rolled a saving throw for a creature with permanent immunity to an effect against that effect, regardless of source or other abilities. Creatures who were born immune to fire do not dive for cover when fireball'd. If I had a player request the save, though, I would probably allow it. Rules as written ...


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Can a creature willingly forego a saving throw versus a spell? If the creature is targeted by a spell that allows a saving throw, the creature can choose to fail that saving throw. Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw A creature can voluntarily forego a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. Even a character with a special resistance to ...



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