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13

The basic rule for weapons, under the equipment section, is: [The weapon's] cost is the same for a Small or Medium version of the weapon. A Large version costs twice the listed price. So most Large versions cost twice as much. But since a club is free, a club for large creatures is also free. Huzzah! What about masterwork weapons? Interestingly, ...


12

I've done a lot of one-on-one GMing. I lived with a family in 8th grade, and I had a 3-4 daya week one-on-one that went on for a year, as well as a few others early on, a few in college, and then 2 relationships and finally my wife. System is the first question for a lot of reasons. The first is you have to find out what kind of game the player wants. ...


9

I find one of the best genres for one on one RPGs is the superhero genre. Think about it, guys like Spiderman, Daredevil, Batman, Superman, Captain America, etc are always fighting the baddies on their own, so it's not a stretch to set up one player with a main superhero (and maybe a sidekick) and go on an investigation. Villains & Vigilantes (old ...


8

Solo's are supposed to be worth 5 normal monsters (thereby suitable to face 5 PC's ... erm ... solo) Elite's are worth 2 normal monsters. I'd think you could re-template the solo as an elite and come pretty close to an appropriately tough encounter. Reduce the HP by 60% Lose an action point If it is one of the newer (MM3 or later) solos, I'd lose ...


6

Ripped down trees are free. The SRD notes that: This cost is the same for a Small or Medium version of the weapon. A Large version costs twice the listed price. Therefore, a club, having no cost, has no cost multiplied N times, to be no cost. With that said, a masterwork tree or a club made out of exotic materials may start getting quite pricey.


5

Burning Wheel does a great job of supporting one-on-one games. The system emphasizes the protagonist's personal goals and moral conflicts, which makes it a great fit for character-driven one-on-one. There's a section in the Adventure Burner supplement dedicated to discussing one-on-one play. The main thing for these kinds of games is that there will be no ...


5

When I played with my wife we simply used Labyrinth Lord (old school D&D), used only one player character, a lot of hirelings and henchmen, and tried to avoid combat if possible. Hirelings are somewhat different from characters in that they are basically level 0 or level 1 characters. Unfortunately for them they often ended up being used as early warning ...


4

I don't use published adventures, but I've ran my group through levels 1 to 30, so I have some idea of how character capabilities change. My first advice would be to replace all monsters you find in that adventure, especially solos, with similar (reskinned if necessary) monsters of appropriate level, preferably from MM3 or MVs. Monster design is a part of ...


3

Start by figuring out your baseline encounter for five players. That's going to be the easy part. Then figure out individual monsters you can add to the encounter that are the same level as the PCs. You might want to have a couple of options: maybe one elite (which is worth two PCs), one normal monster, and a package of four or five minions. Add one of ...


3

I've played Beast Hunters with one GM and one player. It wasn't for me, but I understand it works well for others. There are many, many personal experiences of one-on-one play in this Solo Games thread. Here are some specific threads about Primetime Adventures, Freemarket and Trollbabe: Primetime Adventures Freemarket Trollbabe Finally, I've heard many ...


3

I've played 1:1 games extensively and used many game systems. In many cases its more about the relationship between the two individuals than the game system. However, the game system can support the 1:1 game better or worse. I prefer game systems that help plumb the depth of a character or small set of characters played by the player in the session. A ...


3

Use the XP Budget and don't alter the Solo- this is especially useful if the PCs are beyond a certain level. What level is your party of 2? Let's say these are a pair of 7th level heroes. A 7th level monster is worth 300xp. Which means you can use around 600xp in an encounter for a standard, and maybe boost it up a bit for a harder one. A level 2 solo ...


2

The listing in the description is just there so that in the most common cases (Small and Medium) you don’t have to go look up the Natural Attacks by Size Table. A weapon that deals 1d6 when Medium deals 1d8 when Large, so yes, your claws deal 1d8. The linked table can be used to scale up or down any natural weapon (and its more-or-less identical to a ...


2

There's an entire line of gaming adventures designed for D&D / Pathfinder for one player called 1 on 1 adventures. http://rpg.drivethrustuff.com/product/64278/One-on-One-Adventures-Compendium I've not personally played these, but my initial read-through of them is quite positive.


1

Here's an excellent discussion of running D&D for one player. Key points of interest include: Story and Roleplay are Key Using the mechanics in service of the story and roleplay, and adopting a more cinematic tone provide a PC with a strong heroic feeling. Combat featuring more minions, with strong ties back to the story, rather than a tactical ...



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