Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Have you considered starting a Freeform role-playing game? You can base it on any world or ruleset you like, and simply use the ideas and concepts of the game instead of its rules. You are not required to use anything, no dice, no character sheets, no rules. You simply sit down with your friends, decide who is the narrator, and then assign roles. Be all ...


14

Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple is a whimsical GM-less game about people who get letters asking them to solve the problems of very small worlds floating in an infinite airy space, while working to discover their own role in the universe. No dice: draw stones from a bag. At the beginning of your turn, you draw three ...


11

I'd suggest Amber Diceless Roleplaying (soon to be joined by Lords of Gossamer and Shadow). Though by default, the game is set in the world of Roger Zelazny's Amber, I have seen it used in everything from Science Fiction, to Modern World, to Fantasy, and everything in between. And because of the unique setting of Amber, it supports it very easily. The ...


9

I'd be concerned about two classic DM techniques that seem to be prohibited by this approach: Hidden knowledge - If the players know the result of every die roll, they prematurely learn about armor class, monster strength, or DC requirement. Cloaked passive checks - Another important technique is DM rolling unexpectedly for passive checks, or more ...


6

I firmly believe that having the players roll the dice as much as possible maximises their investment in the game outcome (where the game involves dice, of course); the looks on my players' faces when they get a natural 20 in the middle of a nasty combat, or fumble against a kobold, are evidence of a degree of investment and enjoyment that I don't want to ...


6

Typically the DM has to do a lot more rolling than the players. So, this can be helpful to some DMs. Plus, even if the players don’t know what the rolls are for, it can make some players feel more involved. And for some rolling dice is simply fun and more rolling means more fun. You might think that this prevents the DM from hiding the results of rolls, but ...


6

Never played with such rules but this is what came to my mind when looking at the rules. The good is the players are in total control. The players feel like they have direct control over their destiny. They're not worried about the DM rolling really well all the time and hitting their AC. They're worried about themselves rolling well enough to defend. ...


6

I think it can be done quite easily. In Labyrinth Lord, each monster has a set of Saving Throws like this: MONSTER SAVING THROWS Save Type: GM rolls this or better Chance of save: Breath Attacks: 16 5/20 Poison or Death: 11 10/20 Petrify or Paralyze: 14 ...


5

I've had some similar ideas with valadil, but since commenting is restricting I thought I'd post a full answer to expand on his. I've been thinking about this for a while and I've had a few ideas revolving around game theory. The basic mechanic I propose is a bidding system. In simple terms, when there is a conflict, all relevant actors secretly put forth ...


5

I hesitate to answer, because the only answer I can think of is tangential to your question. Really, classic D&D relies on the DM is making certain kinds of decisions, and part of that decision process involves rolling to decide things behind the scenes. I absolutely love semi-diceless mechanics, but there are so many parts of class D&D that I just ...


5

This is the way I usually play most games; as other have mentioned it keeps the players interest high and gives them more of a sense of being actively involved in their fates. For me rolling against static numbers is fine, I don't see any value in players being unsure whether a roll that was good enough last round is still good enough... unless something ...


4

Tthere's very little point to using math without statistics. A statistical roll requires a function to determine success or failure. A deterministic system (non-die based) does not require an accurate model-of-universe, and therefore doesn't require math. Most deterministic systems are narrative in focus, exploring the stories of the protagonists without ...


3

I ran a Babylon 5 (Mongoose d20 version) game and a DnD3.5 adventure using the Players Only Roll from above with the Mid3d20 variants. I thought it works quite well over all. My thoughts: Problems Not sure all the players like the idea of saving vs being damaged. Sometime the logic of players rolling their defense just felt wrong. It requires some ...


3

I've had some ideas for a diceless system for a while now that sounds similar to what you've described. Basically I noticed that in some systems I was playing with the players had points that they could spend to alter the effects of die rolls. The players and GMs took turns whittling away each others collection of points. When someone ran out, they ...


2

In nearly all World of Darkness games, especially in the earlier editions they recommended minimal dice usage, suggesting even not using them at all. I recall a Changeling module that included a system of combat without dices. Victorian Age Vampire (a Masquerade module) comes with some advice about not using dices. Players must have big trust in the ...


2

There are several fortune-less games out there, I'll name you the ones I find more suitable between those I've personally tried or seen played. Some will only be diceless for the GM, some will be almost diceless, I'll state in bold what applies to each game. Polaris is a game about the knights of a noble ice empire doomed to end with the advent of the Sun. ...


2

System Recommendations CORPS (available only in PDF) - tactical combat is hex based, but can be done more narratively fairly easily. Uses only 1d10 per player, and that seldom; autosuccess is used a lot. Works really well, but a bit mathy for some. Castle Falkenstein is a card based victorian steampunk fantasy, It uses standard bridge or poker decks, and ...


2

(Since this is tagged system-agnostic, here's a general answer with a bit of secondary focus on dnd-3.5.) Implementation Details You may have to reprocess a lot of rules. "Reversing" a die roll mathematically isn't that complicated, but it does involve more thinking than I'd really want to do all the time on the fly. You'll slow down the game unless you ...


2

I tried incorporating this variant as a GM in a D&D 3.5 game a few years ago. I, as the GM, loved it, for two reasons: I could focus my time on managing the encounter. As a GM, I usually have plenty to do at any given round of combat anyway. Rolling and adding together results takes time of its own, but most importantly, there was less "mental ...


2

I agree with alot of what has been said by David and Randall and thought I would add my 2 cents on top of that. There are times when you don't want the players to A) know you have rolled and/or B) know what the roll was. Being both a player and an occasional DM, I don't believe I would want to play by such a house rule. I am not a fan of everything ...


1

I'm becoming a big fan of Marvel Heroic Roleplaying. It's been pretty successfully used in video chat play on Google Hangouts specifically because it's basically just character sheets and dice. It's a very narrative heavy system (Cortex-based, I believe), and doesn't track nit-noid details like exact character positions and precise physical details of the ...


1

There are several kinds of pseudorandomization used in diceless play... only a few of which actually count as random. RSP (Rock-Scissors-Paper) is used in the formulaic Masquerade LARP rules - rules which do, by the way, play fine at the table top. Bid a trait, opponent may bid a trait or retire. If both bid, play RSP. If lose, may opt for overbid with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible