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20

Yes, you can cast spells with a Material (M) component without issue. Your Holy Symbol takes care of it. This is one of the more difficult things to look up in the current 5e rules. It starts on page 58, under Cleric spellcasting: You can use a holy symbol (found in chapter 5) as a spellcasting focus for your cleric spells. In the equipment section, ...


19

Everybody needs a martial weapon proficiency The shield bash rules say this (emphasis mine): You can bash an opponent with a light shield or heavy shield, using it as an off-hand weapon. See Table: Weapons for the damage dealt by a shield bash. Used this way, a shield is a martial bludgeoning weapon. For the purpose of penalties on attack rolls, ...


18

So there used to be this ambiguous rule: You can bash an opponent with a shield, using it as an off-hand weapon. As gatherer818 reports, the bolded section was removed in an errata. This is good, as it clarifies how the rule works. However, despite this statement, you could use a heavy shield two-handed even before the errata. Here’s why: There is no ...


16

First and foremost, each edition of D&D is it's own game, and rules should be evaluated as such. Just because things happened in old rule sets does not mean that it will in 5e. Though it can be helpful to look at old editions for inspiration, you should be careful of the rules environs of the the edition you are trying to modify when making house rules. ...


13

They do stack. You won't find any help in the rules for Armor or Shields, but the Rules Compendium (p 314) has a general entry for penalties: Penalty A number subtracted from a die roll. Unlike bonuses, penalties don’t have types. Penalties add together, unless they’re from the same named game element (such as a power or a trait). Shields and Armor ...


12

No You are considered to be attacking with your second hand on the weapon. You are holding the weapon in your other hand, thus it violates the "with anything in it" clause.


9

You cannot benefit from two shields at once. They both provide Shield bonuses to AC, which do not stack with one another. Moveover, as you note, those bonuses become void the moment you actually attack: rather than give a bonus to AC, the bucklers start giving you penalties to attack. Your attack routine therefore looks like this: Main: +1 (BAB) +3 ...


9

You can do, but its costly (assuming you are already wielding the weapon in question with one hand) Standard Action: Remove Shield As BESW pointed out Rules Compendium page 267: "To use a shield, a creature must strap it to the forearm. Doing so is a standard action unless otherwise noted. Removing a shield is also a standard action." Free action: ...


9

Technically the DM is not required to tell players whether an immediate interrupt will cause a triggering attack to miss unless the interrupt explicitly says so. Players may be able to figure it out on their own if they're allowed to see the DM's die rolls (some groups do this, some don't) and they've had a couple example attacks to estimate the monster's ...


9

Yes. The actual rules for this are oddly worded, but the notation is pretty simple. In general, there are two formats for "things that increase your AC." The most common format is the one attached to armor: [your AC equals] 11 + Dex modifier or Draconic Resilience: your AC equals 13 + your Dexterity modifier. Note that there is no "plus" at the ...


8

Before (unfortunately). The trigger is [being] subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage And that is when the decision must be made: when the effect is hitting you. If the decision time was after rolling the save, the trigger would be "after making the roll" or similar. But it says "if you ...


8

After: You choose to use the feat after successfully saving Here is the order of events as per the rule you quote: 1) You find yourself in a fireball's area of effect. 2) You get to roll your Dexterity saving throw.* 3) "If you succeed" on this saving throw you "can" use your reaction to get the feat's benefit. [The "bold quotes" here are straight from ...


7

From page 203 of the 5e PHB Casting some spells requires particular objects, specified in parentheses in the component entry. A character can use a component pouch or a spellcasting focus (found in chapter 5) in place of the components specified for a spell. In regards to the Divine Focus the 5e designers stated here A divine focus can be ...


7

Yes. You can use a light shield with a Metamagic Rod For any shield aside from a buckler, which is strapped to your arm, you must have a hand to hold it. However, You would be able to use that hand to hold an item, per the ruling for light steel shields and wood shields: From http://www.d20pfsrd.com/equipment---final/armor/shield-light-wooden-or-steel ...


7

The short answer is the penalties stack. Source: page 275 of the player's handbook states: Penalties: Unlike bonuses, penalties don’t have types. Penalties add together, unless they’re from the same power. If two monsters attack you with the same power and each causes you to take a penalty to a particular roll or score, you don’t add the penalties ...


7

Every historical manuscript we have today on medieval sword fighting techniques describes and depicts the shield being used in the left hand, which is the off hand for 70–90% of the modern population (which is reasonably extrapolated to historical populations). As Alex P notes in a comment, the sword is actually a tool of finesse and control, not a blunt ...


6

No, with one exception. In general, shields are not weapons. Note that in PHB1, shields are listed with armor on page 214, rather than with weapons on pages 218 to 219. The Master at Arms feat only allows you to quick draw weapons, and shields are not weapons... ...Unless it's a spiked shield, which counts as both a light shield and a weapon. Sure it ...


6

Yes, it takes up that hand's weapon slot (because it already did). Basically, you can either have an enchanted shield or an enchanted arm slot item. You can also have a weapon in each hand. You can't wield another item in that hand (you can hold an item, but not wield it). Thus you can't otherwise wield a magic weapon in that hand so you've got that. The ...


5

This is adjunct to Wax Eagle answer. Historically Shield Bashing was used part of the whole package of skills learned when using a sword and shield. This included maneuvers what we could consider to be a type of grappling along with full body contact. What they amounted to in an abstract was to get the opponent prone or out of position so you had an ...


5

This is explained on page 203 of the PHB under the Components section: Somatic (S) Spellcasting gestures might include a forceful gesticulation or an intricate set of gestures. If a spell requires a somatic component, the caster must have free use of at least one hand to perform these gestures. Material (M) A spellcaster must have a hand free to ...


5

As with a lot of the questions you're asking about Dungeon World, the answer here is 'it does if it makes sense within the fiction you have established so far'. A definitive yes or no is impossible, because it depends so much on the individual circumstances within whatever scene the question is being asked about. So, you need to ask yourself - does it make ...


5

Unfortunately, the rules don’t explicitly define the terms they end up using when it comes to shields, especially when used as weapons. There are a number of ambiguities, in both Pathfinder and the 3.x rules that they derive from, around their use. The way the rules end up working, shields can have a number of “modifier” terms associated ...


4

Unequipping your shield is a standard action, according to the Rules Compendium's section on Shields (p267): To use a shield, a creature must strap it to the forearm. Doing so is a standard action unless otherwise noted. Removing a shield is also a standard action. Unfortunately, this means you won't be able to use a standard action for an attack in ...


4

Yes, you can wield a shield and benefit from Draconic Resilience. You've noted the relevant passages, so, no point in repeating those. However, I've been planning a melee Draconic Sorcerer for a while (see my threads here and here), and the main suggestion was that I needed to up my AC (and to do so, picking up Warrior/Cleric for Shield prof was one of the ...


3

The shield gives +1 to AC in the printed version of the book. It is most likely a peculiar typo in the pdf, as it makes much more sense to grant the ability to use a shield without penalties if it actually does something.


3

This is a ongoing debate, and one that each GM must decide. According to rules as written yes, they stack. According to rules as intended they do not...


3

A heavy shield, as a one-handed weapon, can be used two-handed for 1.5x Str mod damage. Wording that previously confused this point was removed in the Pathfinder 1.4 errata available here: Page 152—In the Armor Descriptions, in the Shield, Heavy; Wooden or Steel entry, in the Shield Bash Attacks section, in the first sentence, delete “using it as an ...


3

The Rythm blade increases your shield bonus, the other blade provides one. This makes it's quite clear in my reading that your existing shield bonus (+0 if you don't have one) is increased by one, allowing it to stack with your existing shield or other shield bonus. However, the Shielding blade provides a shield bonus which does not stack with a shield or ...


3

The language is thoroughly ambiguous. It can be interpreted in either of two ways: (you can use your reaction to take no damage) (if you succeed on the saving throw) If you succeed on the saving throw, you can use your reaction to take no damage. (you can use your reaction) (to take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw) You can use your reaction ...


2

There are good reasons why historical treatises show the shield almost always in the left. One is practical - defenders in castles have an advantage by havin the shield on the left hand. One is religious - the left hand was considered to be inferior for religious reasons. The term for the left hand is the sinister hand... while the right is the dexter hand. ...



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