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59

I'll deal with your first example first: standing on a table in that situation is not particularly an advantage. It's also, therefore, very unlikely behaviour for a martial artist. (Not counting Feng Shui players). Standing slightly up from your opponent, on the other hand, is an advantage for many of the reasons below. It brings your kicks to better ...


37

Stop dealing with the 98% of the population. If they're so rich, they are now peers of the 2% of the population who rule in various ways. Peasants may have little to offer in reward (perhaps fealty?), but queens, nobles, generals, and the heads of merchant empires will want to either control or ally with such powerful figures – before their rivals do. As a ...


18

There are two real world reasons I can see: To strike something above you, you have gravity working against you. To strike something below, you have gravity working with you. Your balance is better when leaning forward than when leaning back. When striking something above you, chances are you'll lean back and vice versa. As for inclusion in a game ...


17

There are weapons that give a bonus to AC. Off the top of my head, the parrying dagger and most of the double weapons have the defensive property, which gives you +1 AC for wielding them with another weapon in your other hand (or wielding them in both hands, in the case of the double weapons). There are also feats that give you an AC bonus for certain ...


16

This is true in the majority of RPGs I've seen, including all prior versions of D&D. The problem is one of level of abstraction; how specific do you really want to get with differences in defensive capabilities between different weapons? Some of the older editions (and certain versions of Traveller, for example) had varying to-hit based on your weapon ...


13

I see no problem. Let's assume the characters are not essentially rich, they just have very valuable equipment. They could have stolen it, found it, or rewarded with it. Apart from that, they don't need to be very rich. If they want to trade their equipment for a cheaper one and buy a house or a farm (if they can), let them have it. On the other hand, ...


12

I used to play The Dark Eye (Das Schwarze Auge) myself and in my opinion it strongly resembles medieval Europe - apart from the obvious fantasy additions. It's rule books give information of the economy, trade and demography of nearly everything. Therefore the dilemma is quite understandable; in medieval Europe a sword was worth a fortune and in the world ...


12

4e made a conscious decision to prefer speed and balance over "realistic" simulation. This is, after all, the game that decided a spell called "fireball" is actually a fire square. Adding the complexity of per weapon defenses would complicate and slow down the game. It also adds more variables, creating more opportunities for unbalanced things to sneak ...


11

Higher ground has some general advantages that the bonuses you refer to might take into account: Elevated ground gives a better view of the combat, even in melee situations. Looking up towards a combatant in general obscures intent more than looking down does, especially since most attacks originate from a higher elevation. The combatant on the higher ...


9

There's a Few Shadowrun, GURPS, and New World of Darkness are all noted for their lethal and 'realistic' combat systems to various degrees. Certainly all three games treat combat as being a serious affair in which people die and injury is to be avoided at all costs. But all systems abstract to some extent There's no such thing as an absolutely realistic ...


9

There are several ways to approach this. The most common and easiest is: Handwaving. In short, probably the traditional approach to this problem is to essentially ignore it. The peasant needs to offer a reward of 1000 Gold Pieces and it doesn't make any sense for his entire family to have anything close to that... well he does anyway. It's not realistic, ...


7

Starting the early 1980s I purchased a number of systems coming out that promoted themselves as being able to handle multiple genres. They generally fell into two categories: systems that used a core set of rules but sold each product as a separate RPG, and systems where the core rulebooks were genre-neutral and the additional books supplied specific rules ...


7

All armies prefer high ground to low — Sun Tzu, The Art of War One simple answer: Energy. Anything higher has more potential energy ready to be instantly released against an opponent. Bringing down a hammer is much easier than lifting it up.


7

Interesting question. I can't come up with a really good solution, but here is an unorthodox idea on how to tackle this: How about using a strategy computer game to model the progress of the city? This does provide some level of abstraction (a rather strong abstraction with some games), but it would give you: resource requirements time requirements ...


6

Relationships as Rewards Your awareness concerning the disparity-in-wealth issue might be more of a solution than a problem. While many GMs are looking for trouble for PCs to get into, you have already identified an excellent jumping-off point for all kinds of adventures. Poor NPCs will naturally seek help from characters that appear to have more ...


6

I've had the same issue last year and did some days of Googling to find out what I needed. Even though I didn't need those tools for the same purposes, I'm pretty much sure you'll find them useful. Solution 1: RP Tools Since you asked for a Windows application, these should fit the most. They're actually five applications that stack with each other. You ...


4

Rolemaster used to be quite realistic. Ok, you still won many HP with experience, but the critical system made it possible to die on a single blow. So, hits that were not critical were supposed to be lesser wounds or small hits that caused fatigue, but no serious injury.


4

d20 hit points do not have to represent actual damage Your hit points measure how hard you are to kill. [...] What Hit Points Represent: Hit points mean two things in the game world: the ability to take physical punishment and keep going, and the ability to turn a serious blow into a less serious one. (D&D 3.5 PHB1, page 145, and the d20 SRD) ...


4

There are two resources I can think of that might be useful: The Kingmaker adventure path for Pathfinder contains some very basic management and realm building mechanics (in the second part of the module) which include realm stability, income, building up different aspects/buildings in a city and what the city needs. I'm playing the Kingmaker adventure path ...


4

I think in your examples, the benefit of height should be outweighed by a penalty for unstable or poor footing. Standing on a rock or a table would be very awkard for the combatant. That aside… When attacking someone's legs in that situation, you are very open to attempts at your head. The easiest way to demostrate this is have a crack at it with a friend ...


3

You could simply alter the parry system. Back in the day, there was a time when I decided to add an active parry to 1st ed AD&D combat. It was a "to hit" roll, with whatever bonuses you would normally get. You were essentially attempting to hit your opponents weapon while they were trying to hit you... which is what parrying with a weapon seems to be ...


3

Okay, lets start point for point. I see your initial problem and encountered it myselve often before i started to develop open plots that use that wealth to their benefit (needs some time of experience as a GM i must admit). The given answers of now are very good. Still its nearly impossible getting PCs from grow wealthy. Most of the time i think, thats a ...


2

How about some explicit disadvantages of being wealthy? It starts by having crowds of beggars waiting for the party whenever they go outside, neighbouring farmers starving after a bad harvest, and priests seeking donations to rebuild the cathedral. You go on to taxation. The simple way is a high tax rate on 'unearned income' with the whole army turning up ...


2

If you want to go for a very gritty low-fantasy medieval feel, HârnManor, a supplement for HârnMaster, deals on a very detailed level with the economy of manors and the village. For getting the economy of a town right, there is a (fan-made, but the quality of fan-made stuff published on Lythia.com is exetremely high) extension called HârnTown. HârnManor is ...


2

In our campaigns we use http://combatmanager.com/ and have made very good experiences. Anyway, it is more of a tracker and it didn't contain a combat map which we didn't need because we use a real world map.


2

Chivalry and Sorcery (which people must be tired of hearing me recommend) has a combat system interesting in this regard. A hit does damage (reduced by armour) that first reduces your Fatigue points; you might consider this being winded. After the second or third blow, your fatigue is used up, and you start taking Body damage, which takes much longer to ...


1

The Chivalry and Sorcery Game Master's Handbook (out of print but still around) gives clear details of how to build mediaeval buildings and at what cost, from peasant huts to royal castles. It also includes the average income for all normal professions, from which you can work out how much profit a business would make, as well as much other material that may ...



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