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0

If you only had 1 rank in only weapons and not another in bows, it only affects that specific craft skill. If you are spending 2 ranks in them, 1 in both, then they are both receiving the bonus for being a class skill.


0

Make the Riddles Really Hard! Use vocabulary that no one knows, or leave out parts that are almost necessary for the solving of the puzzle. Then characters can roll Knowledge skills for a chance to get hints. The hints would be fairly large ones, depending on the roll, and give enough information for GREEN to solve it, but without them, BLUE has very little ...


2

Would you expect a fighter to be played only but someone that is good at fighting? We use dice and numbers to get around this problem. The same is true of smart characters. If it is an real in game problem use dice. If you want the player to sort out a problem then you have to let them all do it and just say the smart character actual solved it in the game ...


-1

I don't see why you would need to make a skill check in the first place--just fold your wings. Personally, I would require a skill check to pull out of the plummet, though, unless you can shed your speed by some other means (say, feather fall.)


2

Yes In almost every game or circumstance, it would seem pretty odd if you couldn't do something and intentionally fail. There are surely some exceptions, perhaps such as psychic or magic attempts with certain rules or logical commitments needed. If you want to fail but look like you were trying, that might require (a note to the GM, if you want to fool ...


1

Surely this is a matter of: player states desired aim, DM assigned target number and appropriate skill, roll to determine success or failure, In most cases you dont deliberately fail a check you just succeed at a different one. Your bard wants to sing so badly to drive customers from a Tavern .. actually that surprisingly difficult to do well :)


8

First, figure out why the puzzle exists in your game in the first place. If the goal of the puzzle is to challenge or entertain the players directly, then focus on that and don't worry about their character resources so much — those are secondary to the experience you're going for in the moment. You may be thinking, "But what about game balance?" Most ...


2

From a strictly RAW POV, with a DM out to get you, possibly, but you can avoid it. As ltab notes: Both PF and 3.5 simply state "When your character uses a skill, ...", with no actual conditions for when this is/is not the case. By this logic, if you make a fly check, you might have to roll and proceed using that result. But there are ways around this: ...


11

If you're into it; you can write down the riddle in multiple descriptions and give the appropriate one to each player. The description for a character who is dumb as a door might be little more than "you see weird symbols on the wall" without even drawing them in the image (thus not even allowing the player to figure it out unless the others talk him through ...


5

Can you intentionally fail a Fly skill check, or any other skill check for that matter, if you, or your character for that matter, decides that the effects of failing the check are what is desired in the situation? The other answers cover the Fly situations, and I agree that there you can intentionally fail, with the caveat that it's actually a failure: ...


1

Two methods come to mind, and they are not mutually exclusive. First, provide a "Good Roleplaying" bonus. Maybe it's an XP multiplier at the end of a session based on player votes for best RP, or a spot award of a handful of XP at your discretion. Maybe it's a Force/Fate/Luck/etc point. This may help more for Blue. Second, allow relevant checks for ...


6

Yes. (ish) As Sandwich points out, Fly (and skills in general) generally only need to be used when there is some possibility of failure or difficulties. Falling from a height would not usually be considered such. It becomes rolling dice for the sake of rolling dice. Interestingly enough however, this interpretation is not completely borne out in the RAW. ...


5

I've run into this problem a few times at my table. I found that the two most effective ways to retain the realism and our perception of character are either to explain it with fluff or make both player skill and character skill important. Explain it with Fluff You have to keep in mind that the characters in most parties most likely think in very different ...


3

There are 2 sides to this argument. Player's ability to solve problems are independent of stats and should be treated as such. Good roleplayers should roleplay problems, independent of the player's ability. both of these are valid arguments, but this is where "GM Identity" kicks in. Each GM will have a different answer to this problem, and that's why ...


14

From http://www.d20pfsrd.com/skills/fly You generally need only make a Fly check when you are attempting a complex maneuver. Without making a check, a flying creature can remain flying at the end of its turn so long as it moves a distance greater than half its speed. It can also turn up to 45 degrees by sacrificing 5 feet of movement, can rise at half ...


1

Yes. This is what makes roleplaying interesting, and is an option in every roleplaying game. A game that forces the player's choice is not a roleplaying game. As far as I know, there is no rule against this in 3.x/d20. Edit I'll leave a quote I heard a couple years back on the subject of rules for roleplaying: In poker, there are no rules for ...


-1

Another very powerful option for a few levels from now. Ring of Revelation - Choose another mysteries armor revelation. I.E. Air Barrier. You will need a decent UMD but you have the skills points and the charisma. Because you will be emulating a mystery you do not have your effective level for the use of the ring will be your UMD check minus 20. You can use ...


4

I remember reading somewhere (might be in an earlier edition though) that all you needed to do was roll the appropriate weapon skill with an hard-ish treshold. I'd say you'd have to seriously repair a weapon if you get a critical glitch though. A shell exploding the middle of your barrel wont be fixed by hitting it once or twice against a wall. I'll try ...


2

The core rules don't explicitly cover this. If the GM states that the gun is jammed because of a critical glitch, then they should also come up with what needs to be done to unjam it. If it were a critical glitch, I would say they have the take an Automatics test with a Hard threshold. If it were a simple glitch, I would way they have to use a complex ...


5

Speaking, No. Understanding, Maybe. The few Familiars that can automatically speak, do so "as a supernatural ability." From PFSRD: Familiar Basics Skills: [...] Regardless of a familiar's total skill modifiers, some skills may remain beyond the familiar's ability to use. and further down that page: Intelligent Animals Increasing an ...


0

No, it doesn't. In the example, the scout should have seen a potential ambush, with no need to roll, if his passive score was sufficient. The fact that he asked to make an active roll doesn't change that. He certainly shouldn't be punished for taking extra care. Barring exceptional circumstances (the PC is blindfolded, or the PC is hugely distracted...say, ...


3

In the absence of the DMG for 5E, it's going to be a judgement call on the part of the DM. However there's no point in rolling if you have no chance of failure, so I'd argue that an active roll always supersedes a passive check. That said, there are a number of ways to explain away a poor result. One is that the signs were noticed, but dismissed as ...


1

No, passive doesn't supersede active perception. They work mostly in parallel to each other. What happens in passive perception is the object or event that is going to roll if they pass your perception and is actively hiding from you. The burden of rolling is on the object or event not on your PC. But when you start actively searching, the burden of rolling ...


9

Yes. Though in reverse. Passive perception should be checked first, and the DCs may be different for passive and active perception. Passive Perception often sets the floor. Basically a lot of the time you're rolling to see if you can get higher than a 10 and maybe do better than your passive. To clarify. If a passive perception meets the DC, you shouldn't ...



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