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3

Fate resources There are some fate resources for this. Its worth noting that the fate system toolkit briefly touches on this concept. It talks about Professions as skills instead, This focus on what a character is is a similar approach. Also, the Fate Core rulebook contains information on this approach in the information on the Fate Fractal / Bronze Rule. ...


4

Your first stop should be the classic Over The Edge, which uses Traits in a manner very close to what you describe. (A version of the rules is available as an open game system, the WaRP System, available for perusal here.) Once you've seen that, check out RISUS by S. John Ross, a game with a similar bent but more focused on humor.


4

Prose Descriptive Qualities has such a skill system, and works largely as you describe. The system is much looser than fate mechanically—no skills are defined by default. Note that the link might easily change, as it has already been removed from the freebies page site. Of note is the guidelines on specificity and overbroad skills.


1

D&D Next, as of present, has no direct equivalent to either Take-10 nor Take-20. At present, 4 "final" rulebooks have been released: The Starter Set, the Players Basic Rules, the DM's Basic Rules, and the Player's Handbook. Yet to be released are the Dungeon Master's Guide, and the Monster Manual. The passive scores, generated using a base of 10, are ...


7

The major advantage of firearms over melee weapons is keeping the enemies at range - which would seem to be extremely valuable in a zombie-world where often one bite can mean infection and death. (Though of course in AFMBE there's lots of zombie types, not sure what you're facing...) Even though they may get "more kill" out of hitting a zombie directly, it ...


-2

Arm some of the zombies with range weapons from behind cover. They don't have to be high tech weapons; thrown rocks, logs or barrels pushed down slopes or off balconies Mass the zombies in an open area behind a pinch point like a closed doorway into a shopping mall or a turnstile into a stadium. The players will risk being torn to pieces if they go hand to ...


24

10 yes (sort of), 20 no. Taking 20 was not a thing in 4th edition, and is similarly absent from 5th. Taking 10 however is sort of a thing in 5th, but it's not implemented the way you might think it should be. Basically, the way "taking 10" works in 5e is that every ability (And by extension, skill), has a "passive" score (Basic Rules v2 page 59). This is ...


-8

Give them a reason to use that shotgun. Or give them a combo weapon that won't make them less likly to hit. Like a hammer and gun cross or brass knuckles. Yet unless they are getting beat upon don't sweat it; just enjoy the fact that they did the unique choice over the expected choice!


0

If I were the DM being asked about the feasibility of this disguise by a PC, I would want to know a LOT more about how the PC planned to pull this off. If they wanted to wear some makeup and claim to be a dragon who had changed his shape into that of a humanoid, both Disguise and Bluff would come into play. If the player wanted to build a suit of "armor" ...


2

TL;DR I suggest to take Animal Ken, Athletics, Contacts, Crafts, Doxa, Empathy, Episteme, Fight, Manipulate, Notice, Perform, Physique, Resources, Sail, Shoot, Stealth and Will, taking inspiration from existing games set in mythological Greece. Steal from similar games There are a few games out there that have a similar setting, so let's have a look what ...


-1

No. There are three circumstances when a dwarf may attempt to disguise themselves "as a dragon", but none qualify for either -2 penalty. Without the aid of magic, the dwarf who attempts to disguise themselves as a dragon automatically fails their disguise check, the same as if they attempted to use a spot check to see the inside of a locked chest. ...


5

Yes RAW doesn't say you can't disguise yourself as something of a different type. It also doesn't say you can. One bit of note is that the Players Handbook has this not in the SRD: A disguise can include an apparent change of height or weight amounting to no more than one-tenth of the original. Rules Compendium makes some minor additions to the ...


1

It's not explicitly mentioned in the Disguise skill section, but look over at the epic use of Disguise, in which we learn that: Changing height and/or weight a matter of 11% to 25% conveys a -25 penalty. Changing height and/or weight a matter of 26% to 50% conveys a -50 penalty. So off-hand, we can infer that at the very least such an attempt is very ...


2

Passive Perception is always on When characters are just moving around, sitting around, doing other things, they still always have their passive perception. They can spot traps and detect enemies hiding whenever they would come within sight/hearing range of the object/creature in question. As a rule of thumb a DM should have all of the PC's passives already ...


3

From page 178 of the PHB: Investigation. When you look around for clues and make deductions based on these clues, you make an Intelligence (Investigation) check. Perception. Your Wisdom (Perception) check lets you spot, hear, or otherwise detect the presence of something. In other words, a player could use Investigation to find a trap having detected a ...


10

Perception is for observation, Investigation is for deduction. Some of this answer will be observations on how Wizards has done it so far and some of this will be logic, and some of it will be mechanics. First for the headline question. It depends. when to use Investigation, and when to use Perception is not entirely clear yet, and I'm hoping we'll get ...


1

The simple rule of thumb is that Intelligence(Investigation) is used when the character is actively searching for something specific (even if it's a generic sort of "clues" or "traps). Wisdom(Perception) is used when a character is passively able to have a chance to accidentally discover something, or is on the lookout to possibly find 'something' then ...


0

If your players are crafting characters that do not fit the structure of the story you are trying to tell, you need to sit down and talk with them about what both of you want out of this campaign. Let me be clear: There is nothing wrong with wanting a simple hack-and-slash adventure. And it's clear from the way you've worded your question that this is ...


9

In my experience, the best way to find uses for obscure skills is to let the players come up with them, and just go along with their suggestions if they're halfway plausible. If your players are creative enough, as yours seem to be, they will come up with ways to use their oddball skills if you let them. To make this work best, you'll need to let your ...


8

The skill Spot has epic uses and is useful to all but blind adventurers. It's one of those skills that if a character can he should put maximum ranks in it. But, even if he does, it's a good idea to have the skill even higher. I've drawn from a variety of sources in this list; abbreviations are available here. Improving Spot Skill Checks with Spells The ...


1

You could take those skills as a hint to provide them opportunities to use those skills. I’m increasingly seeing the GM’s job as providing obstacles to what the players and their characters want to do. These may be a hint as to what that is. On the other hand, as a player, I may choose a skill simply because it fits with my background. I don’t expect it to ...


4

What's wrong with just letting them use the skill? Even if it just happens once or twice in the entire session, give them an opportunity to have their skill become useful. Often, allowing a story to go in this direction becomes a memorable experience for the player. For example, one of the characters has a "Boating" skill. Perhaps the players could normally ...


1

One possibility is to handle those "background.skills" a little broader. This depends hugely on the specific system involved, but if it's open to interpretation reflect on what those skills could represent. For example Basket-weaving. a Basket weaver needs patience, concentration and has a firm grasp on complex "structures". So give him a bonus when solving ...


4

I believe that if you have a definite plan for a genre/setting for your campaign, you and your players have to work together to make it work. This includes character creation. It's going to be tough to fit a pacifist, privately educated art historian into a campaign based around the mob and violent crime. The first thing I do with any campaign is to present ...


29

Give bonus skill points for a good backstory! If someone writes up a good backstory, and the character should logically have certain skills from that backstory, that aren’t actually useful (or, at least, unlikely to be useful) in the campaign, turn those skills into rewards for writing a good backstory. That’s a great story of how a former ...


2

Generally, when I player picks a skill that is to help flesh out his background, he doesn't expect it to come up very often (if ever). You could treat knowledge skills as passive in the sense that the character knows a little more than the others at appropriate times. Telling them that they know something interesting or relevant when describing a scene ...


3

Custom Magic Item to enhance Spot cost bonus x bonus x 100 GP source


-1

Goggles of minute seeing could work if the spot checks are for traps/hidden doors/etc. you have to be within five feet for them to work though. -shrugs- it's a thought.


3

I don't know why no-one has mentioned "Eyes of the Eagle." They're on page 256 of the Dungeon Master's Guide, and offer a +5 competence bonus on Spot checks for only 2,500 gp.


7

The Magic Item Compendium has a few. Some examples: Third Eye Aware (p. 140). Probably the item you're looking for if all you want is pure spotting. +10 competence bonus, nothing else. 10000gp. A Raptor's Mask (p. 210) is a decent face slot item. +5 untyped bonus on spot checks. "Also" renders the character immune to blindness and dazzling. 3500gp. Eyes of ...


4

Check the Ioun Stone page: Ioun Stone Dark Blue one will give you alertness (+2 on Listen and Spot) Incandescent blue will give you a bonus to all Wisdom checks.


15

A +29 on Intimidate is a very large bonus. Especially on a fighter, who has few skill points and little use for Charisma in most cases; almost all of that is probably from skill ranks, which implies a very high level character. Such a person should be trivially succeeding on attempts to demoralize most anything. Anything short of an actual god should be an ...


4

Skills can't be used for this directly. Instead, the detect magic and identify spells are used, which grant spellcraft checks as part of their spell effects. Spellcraft This skill is also used to identify the properties of magic items in your possession through the use of spells such as detect magic and identify. Detect magic grants you the ...



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