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-1

So, I've had a look at that dusty old FATE 2.0 Fudge Edition book, and I think your solution may be a Personal Extra as per the rules on page 25, in the Extras chapter. Personal Extras Personal and shared extras are mechanically similar - one skill rank translates into one aspect in the target. The main distinction is simple. If something is ...


11

So just to be clear - there is a TOTAL number of points you can have in a skill (usually equal to your character level, see What determines max skill rank?) - but there is not a cap on how many points you can put in per level as you advance, which may be what you're asking. If you're a rogue who has ignored Appraise until you turn level 8, for example, you ...


4

You can never have more ranks in a skill than your total number of Hit Dice. This means that, at level 1, you can only put one rank in each skill. If, at later levels, you want to add a bunch of skill points in the same skill at once, you can, unless that would break the aforementioned rule. The reason for this is to avoid having people put all their skill ...


3

The question I would ask myself is, "Does it add anything to my game to have additional complexity here?" In my game, whenever someone wants to do anything to a lock - lock, unlock, jam it, etc., I see no reason why I should make things more complicated than an Open Locks roll against the lock's standard DC. (Though in the jamming it case, obviously if the ...


0

Baseline: DC of the lock. Add modifiers where appropriate, e.g.: Padlock that needs to be held closed while picking: +5 In the dark: +0 From inside chest (very awkward): +10-+20 Big troll pushing on the other side of the door: +5 for stress, +a lot if no one else is keeping the door closed etc.


5

Many GMs struggle to run gainful social interaction well (cf. this article). In D&D 3.X there are 3 main social skills: Bluff, Diplomacy, and Sense Motive. Some other skills, like Disguise, are effectively a specialized version of one of these general skills in terms of social use. All of these general social skills can also be used for other purposes ...


10

It's Up to the DM Really, it is. Does the DM want everyone to roll every time a character opens their mouth? Or just when they're "selling an idea?" It's up to the DM. As Often As Is Needed This is a good rule of thumb. Roll bluff as often as it is needed. For me, whenever I DM, I only call for bluff checks whenever someone is trying to "sell an idea." ...


1

How long do you want it to take? Any answer, including that it's simply not possible, is reasonable under the right circumstances. Consider the two extremes: If you want it to be easy: A craft capable of space travel would almost certainly need something comparable to a computer, capable of storing and processing large amounts of information. A ...


1

This would probably require years, if even possible to one person on its own. The complexity of the task depends of: the quantity of foreign data available the possibility to convert this data to understandable information The most decisive is probably 2, but as a dictionary or Rosetta Stone is unlikely to be available, you will have to rely upon ...


15

It goes negative This is a case of "the rules don't say otherwise". In particular, the Skills section has nothing to say about results being "low-capped" at 0. Skills can be further modified by a wide variety of sources—by your race, by a class ability, by equipment, by spell effects or magic items, and so on. [...] If the result of your skill ...


14

Would players be tempted to do something out of character that might spoil the game for fomeone? If not, let them roll. Are you (almost) sure they will resist the temptation? Let them roll. Rolling is fun, so unless a roll spoils some bigger fun, let the players roll. Most of my passive perception rolls (different system, but shouldn't matter) are done by ...


4

In general spending skill points on Open Lock is a bad idea because the DCs are very high and there are easy ways to bypass those skill checks without even rolling (e.g. knock). This is even more true for your characters, who get very few skill points. You don't need skill points, you need gp: Crowbar(2 gp): +2 circumstance bonus to opening things via ...


4

This is a typical example for the separation and (at the same time!) inseparability of in character (IC) and out of character (OOC) knowledge. Ideally, your player's will strictly separate these two. In practice, this is often not the case, regardless of whether it's intentional or not. If you know somethings up, it's really hard to not let it influence the ...


0

From the DMG, pg 15: HANDLING PC ACTIONS The important point to remember regarding the actions of player characters during an adventure is that each player controls his or her own character. Don’t force a character to take a specific action (unless the character is under a magical compulsion; see below). Don’t tell a player what his or her ...


26

You have two good options here: Roll for them Don't have them take 10, as this gives them a statistically worse chance of succeeding than rolling. Also be sure you know exactly how much each character adds to Spot, Listen, Sense Motive, Search and whatever other checks you are handling this way. It is likely that characters who care about these rolls add ...


8

No. I think the best way to handle this type of situation is to borrow from later editions and/or flavors of D&D. Make it a passive check! Simply let them all take 10 on their d20 rolls and add their bonus to it. If they succeed, then start giving them clues. You can handle Spot the same way. Cunning players will pick up on this and start making ...


2

Questions and Answers Did the DM employ house rules when he had my character make a Bluff skill check when my character was telling the truth? Yes. Officially, the Bluff skill uses are appear innocuous (Complete Adventurer 102), creating a diversion to hide (Player's Handbook 67-9), delivering a secret message (PH 67-9), disguise surface thoughts (Epic ...


3

One way to think of that situation is how can people believe that global warming is fake? aka they rolled a sense motive against reality and failed :D In the situation described as a DM i might have you roll Diplomacy instead of bluff, since bluff by definition(To mislead or deceive) is trying to conceal something. where as diplomacy is trying to deal ...


4

The Bluff skill determines how good you are at making people believe things that are not true, so in this case I think your DM made a mistake. However, as the DM, it's his mistake to make. If he wants you to roll bluff, roll bluff. There is another option... I would instead make the case that an Intimidate check is the better option in your particular ...



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