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71

A DM should not think of himself as having the right of Rule 0, which is why he controls the game. A DM should instead think of himself as having the responsibility of controling the game, and therefore being given the tool of Rule 0 in order to do so. Because ultimately, that is what Rule 0 is: a tool given to the DM to keep the game fun, engaging, and ...


56

The limit to Rule Zero is what the players are willing to accept. It's that simple. Unless you can convince him to change what he's doing, your only option is to walk away.


51

I've run a variety of tones of campaigns over time and some could be considered "evil"; in fact currently I'm running a three-year long Pathfinder campaign where the PCs are pirates - not all of them are technically evilly aligned, but murder, torture, rape, slavery, etc. have all come up in the game. Here's how you make it work. Decide on Limits, Within ...


51

It all comes down to agency. What choices are the players making? If you are spoon-feeding them encounters, which they have no options but to engage, then yes, it's on you to make sure those encounters are survivable. If they are choosing what to do and what to engage, then the responsibility lies on their heads, not yours. Let's look at two possible ...


49

Ask more generally about their comfort boundaries Tell the party that you have some ideas you think might be crossing the line, and ask them where they'd like the line to be drawn. In that context you might even give examples and include something similar to your idea as just one of several. Throw in a scaled-down version as a test Use the general concept ...


47

First, the generic advice: Plan for it. [You do this.] Set aside the first 30-60 minutes for chat. Hold your players' interest with an exciting game. [You are doing this.] If they're chatting, frankly, then they'd rather be chatting than playing. Make them more interested in playing than chatting by making your game more interesting. Is there a lot of ...


46

It mostly comes down to communication. Both for practical matters (to allow for planning around your absence), and for social ones (letting the other people in the group know you aren't a flake). Tell the GM ahead of time that you will likely be unreliable, and why. Details aren't necessary, but a cursory explanation is polite. When a specific instance of ...


45

The DM is charged with making rulings on a huge variety of things that go on in the course of playing the game. You can make your case for why you think it should be a given way, and then await a ruling. Once the ruling has been made at the table, the DM is right.(1) During play, accept that and then press on as the other players wish to play for fun ...


39

Definitions We all have our limits and boundaries. Lines and veils are different ways to handle those boundaries in play. A line is, well, a line — a hard limit, something we do not want to cross. Lines represent places we don't want to go in roleplaying. "There is no torture in the events in our game. We don't do it, NPCs don't do it to us or ...


33

Yes and no. The limit to Rule 0 is defined entirely by agreement of the people playing the game. If such a limit existed, it would be created by a philosophical limit on the ability for human beings to cooperate to achieve consensus, which would lie somewhere far outside the scope of the roleplaying game they're playing. So in theoretical terms, there is no ...


32

One of my all-time favorite solutions for this was a DM who would have NPCs react to OOC conversation as if it had been directed to them. Generally at very inopportune times. Or the party would miss an opportunity because game time would continue to pass while the chatter went on. He impressed upon us the concept that the OOC chatter had a cost, and we ...


32

Well the thing is it's not a gaming specific term; there's plenty of definitions outside Ron's Big Model specific one. Social Contract Definition The term "Social Contract" (or "social compact") got its start from Rousseau and those types who defined it as "An agreement among the members of an organized society or between the governed and the government ...


32

This is an extremely tricky and delicate situation. As a DM, I generally do not allow social skills (Diplomacy, Intimidate, etc) to be used on other PCs, and while I've never had the issue come up, I don't think I would allow mind-control magic to be used either. The reason? People play RPGs to participate in a group story with a character under their own ...


32

Is she dissatisfied? Is she upset by this situation? Does she desire greater involvement, or would enjoy more if there were something different about the game? Or does she like her low level of involvement? There is no way we can answer these questions. They are questions for her. Talk to her, ask her straight out. She may be just fine with things the way ...


30

As noted, this is a player decision rather than a GM one. However, here is the system that one of my groups used to good effect in the past: Loot is pooled until the end of the night or adventure (although particularly powerful upgrades may be lent out on a temporary basis). Calculate the total sell value of the pool of items (that is, how much the players ...


29

As a GM, there is one thing I hate that new players do above all other things: Don't Be Afraid To Ask Questions Or Speak Up One of the things that new players do a lot is... nothing. They don't feel comfortable yet, so they don't say a lot. That's to be expected, and it's okay. But then you get the ones who won't ask questions when they're confused, won't ...


25

The answer to your question is "yes." This is clearly a communication and expectations issue. Here are some things that will help your group: A DDI subscription if you don't already have one. This gives you a searchable rules database and should help put everyone on the same page. Also the online character builder can help get everyone a character sheet ...


24

Some questions to answer in your social contract: Can my character die without my consent? In D&D (and most action-based games) the default answer is 'yes'. Subquestions to ask: Will I get a hint that I'm in serious danger? (In 4e you usually won't need one... it'll be obvious that you're low on surges and survivability.) How likely is this? ...


23

Our very own Graham Walmsley has a book on this very subject: Play Unsafe. The core idea is to always build on others' contributions, never trying to block or frustrate the stuff that other players throw into the game. This creates a wonderful forward momentum where a lot happens fairly quickly, with high player investment and a large degree of the ...


23

Like most table issues, this is a complicated knot of "maybes" and "that depends." Let's see if we can break it down. We have far less loot for our level than the book says. The book is like the pirates' code... More of a guideline, really. While the rules are play-tested "as-is," DMs traditionally are allowed to exert a great deal of influence over ...


21

The player problem that rules changes seem to handle really well is boredom. If combat drags on and on, or if you have two players who are really interested in setting up elaborate tactics on the battemap and one who just wants to roll the dice and move on, then changing the rules to better suit the group as a whole can help. Another thing rules can have a ...


19

This is clearly something the master has no decision whatsoever. The characters need to find an agreement on that. Let them fight. Don't get involved until you see Coke bottles flying around.


19

One thing we did was lead off each session with dinner. Currently we meet at a local restaurant and we take about an hour before going to our host's house to play the game. This serves to get a lot of the OOC chat out of our system. Previously, we've gotten pizza or other food delivered. It was clearly understood that while we were eating, there wasn't ...


19

Here is something a little different to try. Give the 3 most vocal players each a task. The least vocal of the 3 should be the keeper of time. It is their job to know how much time has passed 'in game time'. i.e. "That combat and the short rest that followed took our party 40 minutes of character time". They should keep a written record of this. They ...


18

The value of a formal contract is recording agreements among all participants to ensure everyone understands what is expected. Obviously, a long written contract will make most players' eyes glaze over and kill the fun. Maybe just have a discussion about some things. If you have a widely fluctuating set of players coming and going, a written contract can ...


18

The question is a bit unclear and I’m not quite ready to delete my other answer since I’m not sure it’s inappropriate, but I think this would get lost in it and may be closer to what Zach wants, based on comments. Therefore, I am answering two questions here: How should I tell a player that he’s not playing a character the way he ...


18

In the style of game you're playing, it behooves no one to pull any punches. Kill the characters, make sure that it makes sense in game, but kill them, without mercy and without heed to who or what they are in the game. That's how Martin writes. That said, based on what you've said here, I'm concerned that the style of game you're playing doesn't match the ...


17

While I won't speak on whether doing so is a good idea or not... some items I would suggest including... in no particular order: Punctuality - What to do when a player is habitually late. Attendance - What to do when a player misses a number of sessions. Food - May wish to include a policy on eating while playing or at least establish group feelings on ...


17

Evil can be just as "Heroic" as good! Disclaimer: my experience is primarily drawn from RPG systems where alignment has no mechanical impact on the game or powers. Starting out with some movie reference material... Obi-Wan: "Luke, you're going to find that many of the truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view." Characters are already ...


17

Unlike Diplomacy, Intimidate and Bluff both have well-defined mechanical uses outside of open-ended persuasion. For instance, Bluff can be used as part of a Feint action in combat. If player-versus-player actions are allowed in game, then those uses of the skills are allowed by RAW. That is, in my opinion, why you do not see an explicit rule against the ...



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