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It seems to me you have a party with one insane monk and 2 potentially borderline defrocked clerics. The first is easy to deal with, no one believes him and if he continues the establishment will lock him up as insane for a while. Additionally, who says your world actually is round? As for the clerics a heart to heart from a higher level NPC from the ...


3

Tell the PCs up front, "I might kill you character randomly, I hope everybody's okay with that". If nobody complains, ball is in their court. If someone objects, well, that's that. If they don't want it, no point forcing it on them. This does rely on players being realistic: If they are going to get mad over their character being killed, why are they ...


3

I question your motives, sir. D&D, even Fifth Edition, is still D&D. The Gnome: By running about telling everyone the world is round, your gnome monk is more of a crackpot than a heretic. Unless you have a religion in your campaign that is both monolithic in power and accepts as doctrine that the world is flat, there really is no reason for your ...


3

Appropriate response is key here. Not everyone would be killed for spreading false words or speaking against the Church. You'll want to have a look at some of the answers to my question about dropping clues of a corruption in my campaign. I wouldn't have guards or assassins kill a gnome for spreading false words. Most people would probably ignore him ...


5

You've done everything you should you've communicated how the game works. Personally, after we set those conventions, I don't "re-warn" players or prep them for character death (outside of making sure I'm very clear in communicating what's around them - "That chasm is 300 yards wide, you really can't make that jump."). There is NOTHING you can do that will ...


11

Before you start your next game session, spend some time having them all roll up backup characters. Since it's obvious to you that one of them will probably die next game, save some pain during actual play and pre-position the backup plan. This has the added benefit of communicating how serious you are about the "you're about to die" part, and gives them a ...


51

It all comes down to agency. What choices are the players making? If you are spoon-feeding them encounters, which they have no options but to engage, then yes, it's on you to make sure those encounters are survivable. If they are choosing what to do and what to engage, then the responsibility lies on their heads, not yours. Let's look at two possible ...


7

There will be no [..] dice fudging, I have made that clear The easiest way to bring this to the front of the players minds is to roll openly. So you cannot fudge any rolls. I have had a lot of GMs starting "hardcore" only to end up fudging dice because it fit better. So if you told me you did not want to fudge dice, but still rolled in secret, I would ...


18

In the style of game you're playing, it behooves no one to pull any punches. Kill the characters, make sure that it makes sense in game, but kill them, without mercy and without heed to who or what they are in the game. That's how Martin writes. That said, based on what you've said here, I'm concerned that the style of game you're playing doesn't match the ...



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