Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I would suggest two modifications to achieve your goals, one for your social contract, and one for your game rewards. Tell your players explicitly what kind of behaviour you want. It might seem a little weird, but if you sit your players down during character creation and explicitly tell them that the dynamic that you're going for is a group of people with ...


0

(Don't let your eyes glaze over on this one-- bear with me!) If you strip this situation to its barest essence, what you're doing is trying to set up a game (in the game theory sense) within a game (in the role-playing sense.) What you want, specifically, is a co-operative game (theory sense) within the game (role-playing sense) rather than a competitive ...


1

My technique focuses heavily on how you set up the plot and character resources. To simplify things think in terms of "political capital". This can be different things like: An NPC who owes you a favor Some sensitive information you have on someone that could be revealed, used for blackmail or sold on A membership in some group/society/party that gives ...


2

Bonds in Dungeon World works surprisingly well for this kind of dynamics. The cool thing about Bonds is that you can resolve them, which in game terms means they don't apply any more. When a bond is resolved, you get an experience point and get to replace them with a new bond. Context: In Dungeon World, you need XP equal to your Level + 7 to level up, and ...


1

I think a big one that's not explicitly called out in the rule book and hasn't been mentioned in the existing answers is intra-party conflict. That is, you should work out in advance with your players the extent to which their PCs should work at cross-purposes, and how they should deal with it. Some games, the PCs are all in it together and will always help ...



Top 50 recent answers are included