Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I've upvoted several of the good answers here already, just want to add something from my own experience. During one adventure in my current campaign, my players took an action that seemed to me to be the height of foolishness. I confirmed with them, "you say you want to go in the tomb? Now? You're sure? Okay...". They had a higher level party of evil ...


1

I would be thinking hard about how this treachery could be revealed IC so that your players have as much information about the possible outcomes of their decisions before they make them. That way they also have the opportunity to outwit the kobolds too if they play smart, which gives them as much agency as possible. One thing that might happen on arriving ...


0

Well, that's a tricky situation. Fortunately, this can be solved by sprinkling some NPC action, before they go to the duke. You said that your campaign is a Sandbox. That's really good, because that enables you to just plant side quests anywhere, anytime. Quests that give, in fact, what your players need: fun moments. Before they get to the duke, assault ...


1

While playing a game scene, with players actually in character, you can suggest some intelligence rolls or skill rolls that let the character perceive a possible fraud or unexpected outcome if they proceed blindly in that direction. You can also avoid the roll and just give in the information as coming from the character skills without involving random ...


18

For me this is largely about expectations, signposting and player agency. The first point is expectations. How much was the tone of the campaign discussed before you started? Did you make sure the players were aware you were going for a world where their actions can have negative consequences and that you would follow through on these? This might sound ...


2

I agree with @Nagora, but some ideas to tell them about this "in-game" if you feel it necessary: While they still have a chance to get out of it relatively unharmed, maybe drop more warnings. Have them meet a human slave or something on their way to the duke that tells them to trust no one or something along these lines. After they have been burned, have ...


6

My advice would be not to rub their noses in it unless they express displeasure at you rather than themselves. If the gnome's been in disguise for weeks then they surely know that they're in a "situation" of some sort. If they're happy and you start getting defensive then you're probably going to spoil things to some degree. If they're unhappy and you start ...


0

I think you've already answered your own question. You say the Dragon has already been acting as a supporting face, so there's no reason to assume he can't/won't continue to do so. He wouldn't have been doing it if he didn't mind.


6

GMJoe does bring up two important points, although I fear he skipped the most crucial one. Setting Entanglements: A player is far less likely to abandon a character if they feel that the character will be missed, that their presence and history is respected in the environment they live in. I had a player who had a tendency to switch characters once every ...


6

I've a two-pronged solution to this. It worked for me in a lesser-but-similar situation to yours, but I don't know your players, so your mileage may vary. Story time: A player told me that he was planning a new character, because he considered the current one "done" - He'd already imagined all the situations in which that character's skills would be of use, ...


7

To start off with: Your space just isn't very good for the task you're using it for (RPGs). There are some things you can do to help out, but ultimately change is something you'll want to strongly consider. Making Do You're going to want to specialize your table for what it's good at. Which is providing a stable space which most players can see. This ...


0

Our group uses 1,5L bottles doubling as drink containers and to raise our playing grid and thus create two levels of space. When someone wants a drink someone else supports the grid.


2

Our group always seperated tables. Ie the "Gaming table" had game stuff, NO DRINKS, NO FOOD. Period. If you needed someplace to set your drink, you find another corner table, or TV Tray table, or something .. to set it. This also helped with the spillage problem (couple players were accident prone .. spilling all the time .. sigh) .. so keeping the ...


2

Eat and drink then clear up! No dirty plates around, no empty bags of crisps, no empty pitchers, no rubbish at the table. This takes just a little time and once you cleared things up, you have more room. How about giving XPs (or equivalent) to whoever clears up as a motivation? You could limit the drinks/food to a certain time (say 21:00) but that has ...


4

We hold character sheets in our laps, usually having some kind of folder beneath. World map and area map rotate, there is only one at the table at any moment. If there still isn't enough space we put nightstand’s (or smaller tables or wooden chairs that are flat) that can support two drinks and an ashtray between players. GM has his own where he puts his ...


12

Times when table space has been at a premium in my groups, I've found that the most mobile part is actually the character sheets. Unless players or characters are new/unfamiliar, they don't need to be referenced all that much for most games, and it's often easier to slap them on a clipboard or tuck them into a hardback book. The size of an 8.5 x 11" sheet is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included