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29

Dungeons and Dragons is very much a social game. As such, there is no real "by yourself" to it. The only things you can really do separate from a group in D&D is to educate yourself on the rules of the game, and prepare for whatever sessions lie ahead. Toward that end, I recommend two things primarily: Learn the rules. Study all of the ...


21

This is ultimately a word game. The trouble you will always run into is that no one is "in charge" of the phrase "Role Playing Game," and therefore people can define it however they want. The people you are talking to define a Role Playing Game something like this: Governed by rules. Has roleplaying. Involves interaction between multiple players. By ...


20

To answer the question, especially in a non-critical light, there are quite a few things possible to do with solitare D&D. While it is a social game, there are many elements that can be simulated, especially if you don't have the ability to game with others. Though I do recommend looking at online gaming (on this site and elsewhere), the game can indeed ...


19

Well, Tunnels and Trolls, produced by Flying Buffalo, has a series of adventures that are designed specifically for a single player. They're similar to Choose Your Own Adventure type books, but you have a character that has stats that you roll for, you equip them by purchasing equipment, and then, when adventuring, you roll dice and try to defeat monsters, ...


18

I just remembered something: How to Host a Dungeon, a solo game of dungeon creation where you build a dungeon through its history from the dawn of time.


11

If you're OK with a solo RPG which is extremely depressing – moreso if you don't have a group – there's Hikikomori, which is about a social phenomenon in Japan where young men become shut-ins. The author's own words on how it walks the fine line between RPG and simply writing fiction: [T]his game is a “solo RPG,” which admittedly is kind of an oxymoron. ...


9

Emily Care ran a contest, the RPG Solitaire Challenge, which invited people to make solo RPGs. Many games were written and submitted, and the results were judged to find winners and honourable mentions – so it even answers the "which are good?" part of your question. Emily Care's introduction to the winning entry nicely encapsulates the idea of a solo RPG ...


7

Sure man, You can get a bunch here. http://dwarfstar.brainiac.com/ds_index.html The only one I've tried so far is Star Smuggler. It was pretty good.


7

No one can actually point you to evidence, or reasoned argument for this, because it doesn't actually exist. The argument is made on assumptions, assertions, and shifting goalposts, often with a fair amount of the "No True Scotsman" argument thrown in. But! What might be more useful is to go over some of the reasons people think this way, so that you can ...


6

You can try the Starter Kit for D&D 4e, it has a solo campaign that teaches you about the rules. It's not that expensive, and gives you a simplified rule book and a couple of campaigns to ease you into the rules, character creation, and eventually being a DM. The solo campaigns are like "Choose your own adventure" books, and send you through the story ...


6

The Dresden Files, Your Story contains rules for City Creation which can be done by only one person. It's a pretty sophisticated system which can be used to create a city for any period and any setting without much work involved. Unlike How to Host a Dungeon it does not have a form of an actual game though, but it is a very broad tool.


5

Traveller's Merchant System is known to be fun for Solo Play. Roll up a sector, make a ship, and go try to make a profit!


5

Gah, trying not to self-promote but I wrote a game to address this challenge. It's called The Plant and it was an entry in a contest where "solo RPG" was the restriction applied to me. It borrows elements of Jackson Tegu's The Smoke Dream, Choose Your Own Adventure, and structured freeform play.


5

An alternative to playing by yourself would be to subscribe to one of the many fantastic live-play podcasts which are recordings of a group of people playing D&D. Personally I'm a huge fan of the Critical Hits podcast from the folks at Major Spoilers, the Icosahedrophilia podcast and for a shorter, video podcast the Penny Arcade video podcasts (with Wil ...


4

As someone already said the old Red Box D&D had a solo adventure in it. WOTC have brought that back to life with the "Essentials" range for 4e in The Essential Dungeons & Dragons Starter, and it's very cheap too. However, for something a bit more detailed, take a look at the solo adventure for 4e written by Chris Sims called "Dark Awakenings", but ...


4

Here's a nifty set of charts for playing Traveller on your own. I have had a lot of fun with it.


4

I recommend procedural content generation. As in make random tables to fill your world make rules to make it behave and interact with itself then create a slice of "world" explore and interact with it keep a blog so people can read about it and play it :) It's what a roguelike does. I'd start with generating some cities and some goods to be traded. ...


4

There are at least two alternatives, both of which I have enjoyed greatly. The first is Choose Your Own Adventure, which haven't been in print for years, I think. As a medium, they were just one step less railroady than novels, because you could pick one or two given branches. You couldn't say, "None of those options is what I'd do here!" and explain your ...


4

Two things you might consider- D&D Encounters (a program that generally runs on Wednesdays at your local game shop) and Living Forgotten Realms were created specifically to address people who are interested in playing D&D but don't know anyone to play with yet. Look into joining an Encounters group and see if you can't make friends with fellow ...


4

One system that I think is great for this is the Mythic Game Master Emulator. I find that I can use it to generate not only a plot for a solo off the cuff adventure, but also generate the details of a world and its NPCs as I do so. By the time I am done playing my solo session (even if all I have is a couple of scenes), I feel like I have a living world that ...


3

Mongoose has republished the "Lone Wolf" series which is a more-RPG-ey choose your own adventure kind of solo RPG deal. They also published a "normal" d20 conversion of the books into a multiplayer RPG.


3

There are a number of techniques people have used with the Mythic GM Emulator with some success: 1. Use Mythic to rewrite the adventure. If you want to play as a PC through the adventure but don't think you can separate player knowledge from character knowledge, try this option. Treat the module as rumors the characters may have heard, or dreams they may ...


2

You might also check out Jackson Tegu's The Smoke Dream, which is unfinished (another version is eventually forthcoming, we hope) but very promising as far as solo play is concerned. You wander through and interact with bits of this surreal mansion-y setting, based on draws from a standard playing card deck. Very much like a tabletop version of those old ...


2

DestinyQuest has not been mentioned. I played through the first one and it really was great. I've played Fabled Lands and a bunch of T&T solos and I think DQ is probably on top of the pile. I got a solid 5 hours of game play out of it. I think Mythic can work really well if you imagine you're playing with a very logical and balanced GM who follows the ...


2

The Doctor Who Solitary Story Game is similar to Barbarian Prince (Dwarfstar Games) in design; it is more than a choose your own adventure while still not requiring all the creative headbanging of a mythic-style, solo RPG. It feels like a very open world with very different possibilities each time you play. There's a huge amount of content for that game.


2

Similar to the Dwarfstar games, check out Dark City Games and The Fantasy Trip. The rules are free, light, and flexible. The adventures cost money but there are a couple of free, introductory adventurers.


2

Personally, I suggest two options: Chronicles of Arax, which has a free core rulebook that has a starter adventure that I personally like. It also has really cheap supplements that you can add on to that, and you can get a bundle of stuff for it containing 5 adventures, more gear, and several character classes for $7.50. I also recommend Zombie Death Town, ...


2

Traveller would be a decent choice, since you roll up planets randomly, you're discovering a lot of new stuff. FASA Star Trek has the same characteristic, in terms of coming across weird planets with weird life forms. I think exploratory space sci-fi is one of the best fits for solo play as you're creating the world as you go, and then have something to ...


2

I considered this myself when I started playing, however D&D is a social game designed to bring players closer together. The DM is necessary in the game – you must have one and a player can't really DM and play at the same time. One player and one DM is not exactly an exciting game – however, it is still playable. D&D is aimed at around 3–5 players. ...



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