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8

Yes. The actual rules for this are oddly worded, but the notation is pretty simple. In general, there are two formats for "things that increase your AC." The most common format is the one attached to armor: [your AC equals] 11 + Dex modifier or Draconic Resilience: your AC equals 13 + your Dexterity modifier. Note that there is no "plus" at the ...


3

Yes, you can wield a shield and benefit from Draconic Resilience. You've noted the relevant passages, so, no point in repeating those. However, I've been planning a melee Draconic Sorcerer for a while (see my threads here and here), and the main suggestion was that I needed to up my AC (and to do so, picking up Warrior/Cleric for Shield prof was one of the ...


0

Dipping 3 levels into Warlock, a Sorcerer can get Shillelagh via Pact of the Tome. Because it's acquired via a Warlock feature, Shillelagh will use Charisma instead of Wisdom for attack and damage. Although it requires Concentration, a Sorcerer is proficient in Con saves, and taking War Caster grants advantage on Concentration checks (if damaged). With 20 ...


2

Truthfully, you're not going to find a weapon attack that scales well. However, that doesn't matter as much since you're looking for a weapon attack that is going to be used as your reaction and that actually means that scaling isn't nearly as important as I was originally thinking with this question. This means that basically any melee attack that uses Dex ...


2

It's complicated While skoormit has pointed out that the average increase for 1 die is 21.43, the overall increase for multiple dice is not straightforward, and highly depends on your Charisma modifier, more so for more dice. I used a small python script to roll xd6. The lowest c dice (where c = positive Cha modifier) were re-rolled, unless there were less ...


1

Purely RAW Answer*: Attack rolls are unclear, but damage rolls should be a single roll for all targets (including Witch Bolt's followup actions for the 1d12 damage per round). D&D basic rules, p.75: If a spell or other effect deals damage to more than one target at the same time, roll the damage once for all of them. For example, when a wizard ...


2

# Simple Case: Available Rerolls Equal to Number of Dice Rolled # You can expect half of the dice you roll to be below average. You will reroll those dice. For a d6, you are going to reroll the 1s, 2s, and 3s. Those dice (1, 2, and 3) have an average value of 2. The reroll has an average value of 3.5. So, half of your dice will increase by 1.5, on ...


0

So we have to ask ourselves, how likely are we to need a reroll, how many rerolls do we need, and then, how much does this increase our damage output. I'm going to use a d6 for my examples, because, frankly, it's the most common spell die and the one you're most likely to be concerned about. Similar analysis can be done for higher dice values, although the ...


1

When you reroll a die, you can statistically expect to get an average roll. Therefore, you compare what you got to what the average is, and the difference is how much more damage you'll probably do. The average roll for any die is [sides / 2] + 0.5. For example, a d10 is 10/2 + 0.5 = 5.5. So if you rolled a 1 on a d10, you can expect a 5.5 on your reroll, ...


0

As you say, it depends on what you rolled. The average increase on each individual dice you reroll will be (Dice roll average value, I.E. 3.5 on a d6) - (current value of dice you are rerolling). As an example, if you're rerolling 3d6, one of which came up 1, one of which came up 2, and one of which came up 3, you'll see an average increase of: (3.5 - ...


1

Because they are separate attacks, and not a single splash damage area, the answer to both of these questions is the same Roll them separate. This is because each target is targeted separately, and each attack is independent, so both the attack and damage rolls are separate rolls.


2

I love the concept, Dr. Strange was one of my first super heroes to read a comic about. Would love to know how you intend to do the Eye of Agamotto. I would suggest Warlock for first level; then dive into Sorcerer for a level for the AC boost. Then back to Warlock for another 2 levels. Finally, finish up with Sorcerer. So it winds up being WSWWS+. That ...


2

Yes to all of the above except Bonus Spells. Your Charisma score is effectively two higher for everything under the Sorcerer class entry. However, while the Bonus Spells per Day feature is referenced in the class entry, it is actually a universal property of ability scores for all spellcasters. Therefore bonus spells do not benefit from the increase in ...



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