Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

What sort of techniques be used to make reagents meaningful? How can I reward wizards that go through the extra effort of working with reagents? Once reagents are meaningful, they will reward the player for using them. First off, make them part of the game world: A passing wizard asks to borrow some component, a ritual you are attending requires ...


11

I am pretty sure that the rules never clarify beyond what you have already quoted, and I am certain that the rules you have quoted are not definitive on this point. I, and literally everyone I have ever played with or talked to, have always assumed that casting spells with both material and somatic components takes one hand. Never really paid very much ...


11

No, there is not. The foci for plane shift do not have a listed cost: they are considered negligible and therefore are covered by a Spell Component Pouch: Spell Component Pouch A spellcaster with a spell component pouch is assumed to have all the material components and focuses needed for spellcasting, except for those components that have a ...


11

Kelgore's Firebolt - No The material component for Kelgore's Firebolt is "a handful of ashes", and the spell effect says that it "conjures a shard of red-hot rock." So no, there is no RAW way to substitute your own pebble in there and have it work. Spells only do what they say they do, and the spell says quite clearly that it conjures a red-hot pebble. It ...


9

You either handwave them away or you require them to be gathered on the wizard's initiative and you roleplay it out. Lots of groups opt for the former. It means you don't have to track every live spider or think about how they're stored and carried. The disadvantage is that you lose a huge aspect of the original power balance between wizards and other ...


7

You could tack on bonuses for using exotic reagents. Normal spells are still "I have my pouch", but if they add a bodak's eye to ray of frost then the target also needs to make a fort save 11 vs DEATH. Or a Beholder's eye for +2 spell penetration. Or a drider's fang for an additional poison or immobilizing effect. You could make the effect particularly ...


5

When it comes to vague rules like spell components (and many other rules in the older D&D systems), as I see it you really have 3 main choices: ignore them, let them complicate your life, or make them a tool for the GM. @SevenSidedDie and his commenters indicated 2 common uses that GM's make: keying adventures and power regulation. And if you're going to ...


5

Material components are actual items—that's what the name means. The rules for spell-component pouches are just there to abstract away the details, so that you don't have to track (and play out restocking!) your pouch with exact quantities of spider webs, vials of mercury, bits of cloth, and other weirdness. If you don't have your spell component ...


4

You could borrow from an earlier edition of D&D. In AD&D 2e, to make magic items you had to first get the recipe, which was quite difficult (searching ancient tombs, tracking down a sage and convincing them to answer your questions) or you could research it if you were a Wizard or Priest. Then you'd have to find the materials, and then go through a ...


3

Dragon Magazine Issue 81 had an article called, "Living in a Material World" that dealt with the issue of costs and where to find spell components. It looks like it's available at the Internet Archive (http://archive.org) with a direct link to the Issue 81 at ...


3

Questions & Answers Question: Can everyday items function as foci and material components? Answer: Yes, unless the DM determines otherwise. The only reason I can think of for a DM to determine otherwise is if the DM says spell component pouches are themselves unique creations (e.g. they're connected to a plane of magic, they're specially prepared to ...


2

I would suggest trying the "Legendary Material" Variant that I created for my tables. It's simple, but need some criativity from part of the master and the players. It is a 3-step process, and it goes like this: Step 1: Research The players research a library, buy a scroll from a wanderer, found the schematichs in a stash. Somehow, they are handled a ...


2

Admittedly, my answer isn't drawing inspiration from a tabletop game, rather a computer game. Magicka seems to be the only thing that comes to mind when thinking of component based magic. Perhaps you could have your wizard need to take a few pinches of different ingredients in order to cast a spell? For example Magicka's system (if you haven't played it) ...


1

Spell components seem little more than humor to me and I first played a caster. However, now that I run games it seems there is more use for them at lower levels. The concept is easy - so-and-so of the tall wizard hat requires this spell component and needs you to travel to this field all the way over here and retrieve it. As far as getting your characters ...


1

Well, This is based on my own game, but one could house-rule D&D to make it work. I include other foci and tools in the bailwick of Reagents. And their use and the use of rituals make for a deeper game; but you have to make sure that they do not make the mage more powerful (without other balance), and that some of the tools don't multiply thier powers ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible