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7

It's not really "abusable". The spellcaster casting "Make Whole" still must have it prepared and/or it takes up one of their spells for that day so its use is still limited by the power of the spellcaster casting it. It is more powerful, as a second level spell, because it can cure a max of 30(5D6 at level 5) vs. Cure Moderate Wounds which can cure a max ...


1

A swarm may enter another creatures space, but how big is that space? A medium creature occupies one square on the grid, and one square on the 5th edition battle grid represents 5 feet. A creature in a square is not a solid 5X5X5 cube but a moving, dodging, threatening being. At the moment a spell, such as Fire Bolt is cast, for the sake of narrative, it ...


3

The only special rules we have for swarms are the following: Swarm. The swarm can occupy another creature’s space and vice versa, and the swarm can move through any opening large enough for a Tiny [creature]. The swarm can’t regain hit points or gain temporary hit points. So as far as the rules are concerned, swarms don't have any exception to ...


7

Possession is the least of the problem here, but we'll deal with that first. Possession has two relevant meanings: to have immediate physical control of something, or to own something. However, the phrase "in the possession of" always exclusively uses the immediate physical control meaning. The Hope Diamond lying in its security case isn't in the ...


16

Do you need the weapon? Yes. (I had a whole answer written to answer this part of the question before you clarified...) Does it need to be wooden? Yes. While individual DMs may houserule differently, the requirement for a wooden weapon is part of the spell, and fits with its nature theme. This is similar to druids' requirement to use non-metal armour, or ...


1

Wooden weapons are not required to receive the spell benefits. Ultimately, the quote only references that the wood of the object is transformed, not that it is in fact the source of the newfound magic attack rolls and damage die. In this manner, the initial text can be read as flavor text, especially as 5e does not distinguish between a wooden or metal ...


15

This is up to the DM, but I'd give a good bit of leeway on what works and what doesn't with the spell, with one caveat. The way suggestion is worded, it's not outlandish for the suggestion to be pretty extreme. I mean given that the example in the spell is a Knight giving his warhorse away, it doesn't seem weird that you'd ask a fighter to take a long rest ...


22

In this particular case, I'd argue that the Fighter is able to get up during the battle and help the party. The text of Suggestion has the following: ...The suggestion must be worded in such a manner as to make the course of action sound reasonable. Asking the creature to stab itself, throw itself onto a spear, immolate itself, or do some other ...


3

Short answer: We can't be sure why the Protection from Evil spell wording was changed in 3.0/3.5, but it was probably to do with interoperability of rules (WotC's forte). Neither the 2e nor the 3e versions are mistakes. Long answer: The limitation to melee weapons in 2e is almost cerrainly not an erratum. I can give two reasons for this: TSR constantly ...


5

These two games were written by different development teams at completely different companies (TSR vs. WotC), according to very different design philosophies (Gygax's1 vs. Tweet's). Many things were changed when D&D 3e was written, not the least of which was abandoning backwards compatibility with previous material, something that had been more or less ...


1

Well, I know that Pathfinder is fairly remote from AD&D, but this item from the original DMG might illuminate the underlying philosophy of the spell-level system: After analysis of the [newly researched] spell and adjustment of its parameters, you will be in a position to assign it a level. If the spell is a variation of an existing spell, with ...


1

This line if thinking is flawed and too mechanical. It would only apply (obviously) to directly related spells; Minor Creation and Major Creation for instance, where one is the directly enhanced, "better" version. Other than those kinds of examples, a spell will do what the description says, and that's the extend of it.


20

The only officially stated case where a spell is explicitly required to be strictly inferior to all spells of higher level (or even other spells of the same level) is prestidigitation. It has the following unique line: Finally, prestidigitation lacks the power to duplicate any other spell effects. This is because prestidigitation’s capability is left ...


4

Well, higher level spells should fare better than low level ones because, else, one would just memorize the lower level spell in the higher level slot and call it a day. In other words: If a higher level spell was worse than a lower level one, nobody would need it. Of course, worse spells at higher levels can happen because of bad design, unintended ...


-4

We ruled it like this: Barkskin replace your armor (Leather, Chain, Plate..) And your AC is 16+Dex Bonus + Shield + Ring of Protection, whatever. Keep in mind, it's an concentration spell. So, you wont cast it on the whole party. And the rules dont say your AC IS 16. It says your AC cant be less than 16, means it can be higher. Our Sorcerer has with the ...


3

Purity Judgement I read the effect as-written as: All allies within 30 feet choose an ongoing effect which is affecting them; they may attempt to save (with a +2 sacred bonus) against that effect (even if it normally does not allow a second save), using the effect's original save DC. Success either counts as a success towards removing the effect (for ...


6

In fact, there is nothing in the rules that says you have to tell the player everything about the spell. It's unusual to omit the basic function, sure, but it's fine to let the player find out that a light spell, for example, causes sunburn after a while. And, in fact, the 1e DMG had a whole section detailing "secret" effects or details of many spells in the ...


4

Nothing happens to the spell. Touch spells don't require concentration to hold the charge, as I've touched on before. This means that the only ways to lose the touch spell (barring things like anti-magic fields and dispel magic spells) are to discharge it on a target, let its duration expire (if it's one of the rare touch spells with a non-instant duration ...


-2

Yes, the spell would most likely be wasted due to the spell being discharged on the first object or person it made contact with, but it is up to the DM to decide how to handle determining whom or what that wizard made contact with on the way down since the spell wouldn't dissipate, but would actually be used on whatever it made contact with. On the DM side ...


5

This is totally legit. If you're running a serious game, just let your players know that they don't know how the spell works beforehand (e.g. "The spell's magic is strange. It seems like it's probably an offensive evocation of some kind, but you aren't quite sure what the expected energy output will be like, nor why it has so many cross-dimensional ...


-1

TL;DR This option isn't set explicitly in the rules, but it can be added by introducing more mysterious forms of magic, like Artifacts, whose powers aren't initially clear. However, be careful to avoid making your players feel powerless by changing the consequences of their choices in the system without warning. Full Answer This isn't a question of "can ...


6

You're right that the 5e PHB does not mention how many pages are needed for spells, though as you point out spellbooks are given as having "100 blank vellum pages" (PHB 153). The only hint that there might be a difference per spell level is in comparing these two texts from the "Your spellbook" sidebar on PHB 114: For each level of the spell, the ...


0

I could find no explicit rulings on this within the released material. pp 114 PHB for spellbook description particularly the section called The Book's Appearance in the bottom left corner. Now I don't have any wizards in my current party but I'd DM it as being a magical collection of the characters known spells and let them decide from there. Their ...


2

Cantrips increase by character level, not by class levels. Your ruling is incorrect. The wording on the spells is "When you reach X level" not "When your caster level is X" or "When you are a level X class."


1

There are three general cases: 1. Range Attack The spell says the caster has to do a Range Attack. In that case you do a roll as if you were doing an attack with a range (or melee) weapon, only you use your Spell Casting (Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma) ability modifier instead of Strength or Dexterity. From what I've seen, there is no Saving Throw in ...


3

Unless the spell states that you need to make an attack roll, you simply cast the spell and the target(s) must save against the DC of the breath weapon or spell. So if you have a creature with a breath weapon that has a con of 16 for +3 and +2 prof bonus, you use the breath weapon and all targets must roll a save vs 8 + 3 + 2 = 13. They then take either ...


5

Unfortunately, only witch spells That's a subsection under the heading Adding Spells to a Witch’s Familiar, which states A witch can only add spells to her familiar if those spells belong to the witch’s spell list. The typical witch's familiar only holds witch spells, even if those spells are from a scroll of non-witch spells that the witch has ...


4

Rary's Telepathic Bond says nothing about the spell ending if the character leaves the plane, merely that the unlimited distance of the communication does not extend to another plane. You forge a telepathic link among up to eight willing creatures of your choice within range, psychically linking each creature to all the others for the duration. ...


18

Probably not? D&D 5e breaks from the tradition of several more recent editions of D&D by allowing - indeed, encouraging - DMs to make their own rulings on situations rather than following a single explicit canon in regards to the rules. It also - particularly in regards to spells - attempts to be descriptive (of the general effects and feeling of ...


4

Randy would be out cold for the round and not be able to hold his breath. Holding ones breath is a conscious action and since he was rendered asleep he would not have time to take that breath and hold it. Even if he was holding his breath the second he feel asleep he would let go of that held breath. Would he drown? SevenSidedDie is correct that Randy ...


6

It's not quite your first option, but you do have a lot more choices than your second option. In particular, the caster does not need to be at the center of the cube. 15 foot cube means 15 feet is the length of a side. "Originating from" puts the origin anywhere on any face of the cube, which I take to mean it could be along the bottom side or on a corner ...


24

Death Ward will trigger the first time you drop to 0 hit points, and Relentless Endurance won't. Then next time you drop to 0, Relentless Endurance will be ready to go. Death Ward, emphasis mine: The first time the target would drop to 0 hit points as a result of taking damage, the target instead drops to 1 hit point, and the spell ends. As soon as ...


1

Resistances are explained in PBH 197. Resistance and vulnerablity is calculated and applied only once, so whether magical or not since the barbarian has resistance to slashing, they still gain resistance the slashing. If the barbarian was "vulnerable" to magic, then the question would be more interesting. In the end however, the vulnerablity and resistance ...


3

It's the second scenario. The answer is in your own question. A wave of thunderous force sweeps out from you. Each creature in a 15-foot cube originating from you must make a Constitution saving throw. ... Each creature inside a 15 foot cube.... That's it. The cube is 15 feet.


7

No, a Water Elemental can't move through Bigby's Interposing Hand. The key point that clinches it is in the general description of Bigby's Hand: The hand doesn't fill its space. So if getting past the hand were a simple matter of getting through the available space, any creature could get through without a Strength check, not just the Water Elemental. ...


7

In this particular case, the magicalness of the damage matters not. The Barbarian has resistance to piercing/slashing/bludgeoning damage regardless of whether or not it it's from a magical weapon. Thus they have resistance to the damage from Cloud of Daggers. However, if you did encounter someone who had resistance to slashing damage from non-magical ...


5

Yes, your ruling appears correct Creech and Ruesch's Torn Asunder (2003) from Bastion Press says that Once these criteria are met you can attempt a called shot. You receive a called shot penalty to your attack roll, as per the chart below for the appropriate body location. (28) Targeting the head causes the attacker to suffer a −8 called shot penalty ...


3

That's correct. The spell (like most spells) consistently uses "you" to refer to the person who cast it. In fact, the entire chapter on spellcasting uses "you" to refer to the caster. I could go through and provide a bunch of quotes with the word "you" bolded, but it seems unnecessary. It seems to me that you see the need for it to be the person who cast ...


6

Yes, but only via some finagling. A potion/oil only has one target normally, and the imbiber may not select additional targets even if he would be allowed to normally as the caster of the spell. However, a number of spells that can be made into potions affect creatures other than their direct target(s) in some way. None of the methods of doing this ...


4

The short answer is no. Potions only effect the person that consumes them. The wording " It can duplicate the effect of a spell of up to 3rd level that has a casting time of less than 1 minute and targets one or more creatures or objects." is meant to explain what types of spells can be turned into a potion or an oil with the exception that ...


19

No, you can't see the creature's aura, but you can detect if there's magic within 30 feet of you, including magic items he might be carrying, though you can't determine the nature of the items. From the text of Detect Magic: For the duration, you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense magic in this way, you can use your ...


0

Everything the hard way. With so many answers, I'm surprised no one has thought of the one that can be done with a single lvl2 spell and a sharp bit of metal. All of these answers assume the PCs have already figured out at least that he is using Rope Trick, so I'll start from the point when they figure that out. First step, wait for the current Rope Trick ...


0

Dimensional Anchor, Dimensional Lock, Animate Rope These are cheap spells that work. Alternatively, Camp out where Rope Trick was casted. They can't go anywhere and they've gotta come down sometimes. Sleep in shifts or whatever. Damn. Rope Trick? That's ok. Encounter over. Lets all start healing up and repreparing spells. (Proceed to do this in an area ...


12

The text for the Clone spell says: If the original individual has been slain, its soul immediately transfers to the clone, creating a replacement (provided that the soul is free and willing to return; see Bringing Back the Dead, page 171). The original's physical remains, should they still exist, become inert and cannot thereafter be restored to life. ...


-1

If the dm deems the spell to powerful for a 1st level caster at 1d6 it would stand to reason he could half the dice at 1st so it would deal 1d3.


3

Yes There is no limitation imposed by the spell itself as to what shape you can create the water in. So long as it is a volume that could contain the water so created (preventing creating compressed water), it validly satisfies the clause Water can be created in an area as small as will actually contain the liquid However, note that the range of the ...


-4

By strict RAW, no, it cannot. Rules text trumps examples. The text forbidding Creating Water into mid-air is rules text. The text which describes being able to do so is a usage example. Pathfinder has inherited a fair share of 3.x's notorious tendency to almost never have an example that follows all the rules. This is most visible in example characters. ...


7

Of course it can. The entire Pathfinder (and D&D 3e+) rules set is exception-based. There are general rules, and then more specific implementations break those rules. This is a case of that. Conjurations "generally work" like so, but this specific spell works differently. There's no justification needed, and no "limits" other than those game balance ...


0

RAW 0 level spells are in no way less powerful than 9th level spells except as explicitly stated (y'know, in the rules). That being said, let's take a look at your specific queries: Drench: You can definitely do this, even with a single casting at CL 1. It's clearly within the realm of what a 6-gallon downpour containing 2 gallons of water would be ...


4

From the PHB, page 164: Spells Known and Prepared. You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class. So for the purposes of spells known and prepared, as far as the Druid class is concerned, you are just a level 1 Druid. That being the case, you know 2 Druid cantrips. ...



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