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0

Considering the target of the spell has to be an object... Obscuring Mist? Solid Fog? I would argue, since you can't see through such fog, it prevents light from passing through it as well. Just a thought.


-4

I'd like to offer an alternate view. The wording of the rule is "You can use your action to control the hand", rather than something like "As an action..." - this suggests to me that the intent is that it requires the same level of action as doing whatever you intend to do with your real hands, so things that can be done "in tandem with your movement and ...


2

While it's not RAW, I would argue that Abe cannot use a domain ceremony unless he emulates one with a Use Magic Device check. If Abe chooses to emulate a domain, he can pick any domain he meets the requirements for (or can emulate the requirements for), but must continue to emulate the domain throughout the entire casting of the ceremony spell. From the text ...


6

I think your interpretation is correct RAW. However, in practice my group allows use of the effect on the same turn as cast. We found that clever uses of the spell in combat are most often useful for ad-hoc quick solutions to problems (e.g. get a healing potion to someone otherwise out of reach at a critical moment, grab something that was dropped in the ...


19

Your assumption is correct. Unlike, for example, Spiritual Weapon, Mage Hand doesn't say anything about a free use on the turn you cast it, so it requires your action to cast it followed by your action on a subsequent turn to use it. Minor caveat: An Arcane Trickster can control a Mage Hand with a bonus action, so they could create with their action then ...


9

The target quite definitely remembers who its allies are. For contrast, the Feeblemind spell reduces Intelligence to 1, and explicitly states that they still remember who their friends are and will fight to defend them. In general, animals tend to know who their friends are, sometimes more reliably than humans. As for what it means for a beast with Int 2 to ...


3

1Please read the entire entry including the notes at the bottom before downvoting this answer! I don't like this answer in principle but the tag RAW requires this answer that I strongly disagree with in implementation! No, going strictly Rules-As-Written2 a Demilich can NOT use Astral Projection on itself (and by extension can NOT use the ability at ...


2

In Pathfinder, which is not 3.5, these sorts of immunities are the same as spell immunity (i.e. 'effectively unbeatable spell resistance) and a case could be made that golems et al. could lower their resistance voluntarily. In 3.5, magic immunity is just that: an immunity, and this is not how the ability works. Magic Immunity in 3.5 is defined per creature ...


9

In the case of Hex PHB page 251 You place a curse on a creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 necrotic damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack. Also, choose one ability when you cast the spell. The target has disadvantage on ability checks made with the chosen ability. There are three ...


2

You would lose it when you cast the new spell, which is before the effects of the new spell apply. But it really doesn't matter, because Hex only applies to ability checks, and saving throws aren't ability checks. I'm not aware of any spell that causes the target to make an ability check.


-1

If you look in the Description of the Demilich on the SRD, it specifically stats that it normally uses Harm to heal itself. That and the Spell astral projection specifically states that you have to go with the the party, it would seem that its magic immunity is against any but its own magic.


12

They just know that you say you're casting a spell on them, by default. If you are casting a different spell, they could determine that with Intelligence/Arcana. If you are lying about where you're going, you'd probably need to Charisma/Deception them because they might get a Wisdom/Insight check to determine your treachery. (They might get this for you ...


6

The DC for a saving throw against a spell is 10 + the spell level + the caster's casting stat modifier + any other bonuses, such as the spell focus feat . This is stated in the class descriptions of each class that can cast spells. Flaming Sphere is no exception and I can't see why you'd think it would be. For example, if the spell was cast by a Wizard with ...


2

Yes, a creature CAN cast Astral Projection from any plane AND their physical bodies CAN move from Plane to plane (just not of their own Volition) while "traveling." Note that this spell is different from spells like Blink & Ethereal Jaunt which interact with the Ethereal Plane because only certain planes touch the Ethereal Plane, Material Plane being ...


2

This Answer has been updated to reflect newly found material Yes, the Demilich can use Astral Projection, even on himself. Infact, from reading the spell you HAVE to go with your intended travelers if you want to use the spell at all. As my other answer clarified, "Magic Immunity" is not the same as "Spell Immunity," and while I would argue that they are ...


7

Yes, you can use astral projection from planes other than the Material Plane. The Manual of the Planes describes how spells that access transitive planes such as the Astral Plane function on other planes in the section "Moving Among Transitive Planes" (starting on page 45). Characters generally must use spells or spell-like abilities to access a ...


12

Mage hand doesn't make a hand, therefore there is nothing to effect. Reread the spell description. It's just telekinesis on one object. If your game plays that there's a "special effect" of a hand that appears, that's fine, but has no bearing on the spell effect, which has no such thing.


2

How about Infernal Healing, a first level spell that gives fast healing 1 for a minute and uses devil blood as a component? It's really the most "infernal" first level spell. However, the protection spells are pretty handy, you could just swap for protection from chaos (also opposed to devils) and still get a lot of use from it.


10

Since "mage hand" isn't described as a construct of any sort or having any hit points, I'd assume nothing happens. Heck, part of the appeal of Mage Hand is that it nets you fine manipulation at range with little risk to yourself.


7

Don't replace it. You have a shard of an infernal "prince" (title inflation is so... common in hell these days) in you, and it should provide power as it wants. Evil is known for it's subtle seduction as well as its more overt corruption and destruction. "Hey, if you fight these guys," a voice from your soul whispers, "they won't hit you as often. And we ...


7

First let's look at just Mirage Arcane on its own, to get a baseline, and then we'll look at what Illusory Reality adds. An illusory pit is not actually underground! Mirage Arcane only changes the feel and appearance of the terrain, not its actual shape. You make terrain in an area up to 1 mile square look, sound, smell, and even feel like some other ...


1

For this example, I will use a wizard character with 5 Conviction and 5 Discipline. The way casting an evocation spell works, is you cast the spell with a number of shifts up to your conviction (5), then try to control (and in the case of attacking something, aim) it with your Discipline (5). Assuming you're successful in controlling all the power, you ...


0

The problem is that there are no clear paths to rule on this. With Illusionary Reality you run into the following The object can’t deal damage or otherwise directly harm anyone. So a pit made real can't damage a target who falls into it. And once the target hits bottom and gets up unscathed they will know there is something is up and they are a target ...


4

The area is a 20' radius spread. The general rules for magic (in the PHB) state: The default shape for a burst effect is a sphere. and A spread spell spreads out like a burst but can turn corners. So the effect here is definitely three dimensional. Now, the spell states: These waving members seem to spring forth from the earth, floor, or ...


18

I was unable to find any reference beyond the RAW description of the spell, but I think it's reasonable to assume it can be cast on a wall. My reasons are as follows: RAW Explanations: Underfoot is hardly a precise description. Given a creature's location, this could be a ceiling or a wall - so this restriction does not stop you. The fact that the spell ...


2

As long as you are on a plane that is touching on the astral plane, the spell should work. There are however very few planes that don't. There is nothing in the rules for planar travel in 3rd edition to indicate that the material plane interacts with other planes in a unique way. In all likelyhood, the spell description simply assumes that you are on the ...


5

On subsequent turns, you can use your action to transform affected creatures into new forms. And The target assumes the hit points of its new form, and when it reverts to its normal form, it returns to the number of hit points it had before it transformed. "its new form" appears in both places and must have the same meaning so, yes, each time ...


5

In 5e, there is no split between flavor text and rules text. In the description of Gaseous Form, we are told that Liquids are treated as solid surfaces by someone in Gaseous Form. This can be read a few ways. One interesting way to read it is that rain would be treated as a kind of hail stone -- the droplets would bounce off the creature (as if the liquid ...


26

D&D 5e just isn't this simulationist The question can't be answered by the published D&D rules, as the game is not meant to simulate such interactions in any way 'realistically'. The intent of Gaseous Form is to give various advantages of movement and protection to the user, and though there are limitations it is not meant to be accidentally deadly. ...


10

The Gaseous Form spell says that an affected creature treats liquids as a solid surface, but rain isn't a surface. Looking at the fluid dynamics of the question, I would imagine that raindrops would pass right through the target of the spell, and the gaseous creature would coalesce in their wake. From a role-playing perspective, it would probably tickle.


-7

Yes; you can use Metamagic on Hellish Rebuke PHB pg101 : "...you can use only one Metamagic option on a spell when you cast it, unless otherwise noted..." This is saying that when you cast a spell (whether or not it's your turn as the Spellcasting action, or your enemies turn as a Reaction, you are still casting a spell), you may enhance it with one of ...


8

Twinned Spell doesn't work with Hellish Rebuke Well, technically it does, but only if you are somehow damaged by two creatures at once. Like you note, Twinned Spell only requires that the spell you twin targets one creature and doesn't target yourself, and Hellish Rebuke certainly qualifies. However, all of the targets of the Twinned spell need to be ...


14

If the Warlock is inside, NO. If they are outside, Maybe. The real key here is the wording on Hunger of Hadar. The spell breaks itself down into being inside the sphere, and being on the outside looking in. We'll use that same breakdown as well. (emphasis mine) A 20-foot-radius sphere of blackness and bitter cold appears, centered on a point with ...


7

You can see normally in darkness, both magical and nonmagical, to a distance of 120 feet. - Devil's Sight, Player's Handbook A 20-foot-radius sphere of blackness and bitter cold appears, centered on a point with range and lasting for the duration. ... No light, magical or otherwise, can illuminate the area, and creatures fully within the area are ...


23

No. An arcane focus is made specifically to be an arcane focus. DMs can houserule this differently, but by default an item must be explicitly constructed to be an arcane focus (PHB, p. 151; emphasis mine): An arcane focus is a special item — an orb, a crystal, a rod, a specially constructed staff, a wand-like length of wood, or some similar item — ...


2

Ultimately, this is a descision by the designers simply because it feels more "realistic". When a druid stays in one place, his animal companions can all have their own nests and burrows near the druids home and wander around nearby most of the time to get their own food and so on. A druid who travels would have to care for all those animals traveling with ...


18

I don't know why you think there's only one fourth level spell. Here is the complete bloodrager spell list on d20PFSRD, I count somewhere around 48 4th level spells. Oh, I see - you are just looking at the list of net-new bloodrager spells in the back of the book. Go to the actual bloodrager class description on p.22 of the ACG. It includes both those new ...


3

The presumption that the permanence changes the duration is incorrect. It says "the transformation becomes permanent." The change is permanent after an hour. It's not the duration becoming indefinite, or the concentration requirement being removed. It literally says the effect—the transformation—is permanent.


-3

The spell has 3 independent ending conditions. The transformation lasts for the duration, or until the target drops to 0 hit points or dies. If you concentrate on this spell for the full duration, the transformation becomes permanent. Duration ends Target drops to 0 hit points Target dies As stated in the spell by concentrating for 1 hour the spell ...


18

The transformation lasts for the duration, or until the target drops to 0 hit points or dies. If you concentrate on this spell for the full duration, the transformation becomes permanent. Given the positioning of the second sentence, I believe it is safe to assume that it is providing an exception to the transformation ending by either of the two ...


1

120 feet (probably) D&D 5e has two different kinds of range. Weapon range (expressed as short range/maximum range - PHB 147), and spell range (expressed as a single value - PHB 202-203 and in spell descriptions). A thrown stone, as an improvised weapon (PHB 147-148) has the weapon range of 20/60. A Magic Stone, as per the spell's description has a ...


8

As nothing special is indicated for hurling the bullet with a sling, the normal rules for sling range apply: 30/120.


11

You are correct. A target brought to 0 hit points by this spell is turned to ash and automatically considered dead. And yes, the Revivify and Raise Dead spells would be useless, as the target's body is now thousands of ash particles. Remember that a lot of the spells in D&D 5E are big on their effects. Now, there are ways around this. True Resurrection ...


0

The maximum spells you can cast in a round is 3. Generally it's going to actually be only 2 on your turn, since reactions are usually outside of your turn. On page 159 of PHB: You can only take one bonus action on your turn, so you must choose which bonus action to use when you have more than one available. Quicken Spell, Action Surge, or a spell that ...


6

If the fragmentary stone can solidly support it, yes. If not, no. Add some tolerances so that the wall doesn't fold like a cheap deck chair when any force beyond its own weight is applied to it, and that should holistically cover all uses that are reasonably fit within the spell description's use of "solidly supported."


14

Mike Mearls rules Wall of Force does block spells, including lines of effect Quoting Mike Mearls on Twitter: Aug 28Jim Miller ‏@pokereleran@mikemearls Is there a line of effect in D&D and does Wall of Force block it? Mike Mearls – ‏@mikemearls@pokereleran in general, a barrier that stops physical objects stops spells In terms of this being a ...


3

Believe it or not, the D&D fifth edition designers must have read this very question, because 5e goes as far as explicitly defining its thickness and behavior when splitting an occupied square (PHB p. 285): ... In any form, the wall is 1/4 inch thick. It lasts for the duration. If the wall cuts through a creature's space when it appears, the ...


4

There are three potential interpretations in play here: One interpretation is that visual concealment is necessary for total cover, leaving targets on the other side of a wall of force, or a mundane transparency such as a floor-to-ceiling windowpane for that matter, fully targetable by spells and spell effects, or even mundane attacks (albeit with no ...


1

Nothing being able to pass through the wall makes it count as total cover, and that makes targets on the other side of it invalid spell targets. From "Targets" in the PHB's Spellcasting chapter, page 204: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover.


10

I'd like to point out that Guidance has a duration of "Concentration, up to 1 minute". If you look at the first level cleric spells, the following also require concentration: Bane Bless Detect Evil and Good Detect Poison and Disease Protection from Evil and Good Shield of Faith Generally speaking, most buff/de-buff spells require concentration. Since ...



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