New answers tagged

-2

Thunderwave has an AoE centered on the caster, therefore wouldn't it make sense that other AoE spells wouldn't damage the caster?


-2

you must make a melee attack with a weapon against one creature within the spell’s range, otherwise the spell fails. You can; but you don't have to.


1

The "Doors" section of the DMG (page 103) specifically describes methods for getting through locked doors. (This guidance could be applied to chests or other locked objects. I would suggest it should be, as most objects with locks have some sort of door.) Arcane Lock specifically protects from the first two methods: "pick the lock with a successful ...


0

The Technomancer is a prestige class that advances the spellcasting progression of a different class. As such, it isn't a casting class itself. Not every prestige class that add levels of spellcasting (getting "+1 level of spellcasting" basically counts as having one more level in the casting class of your choice for determining several spellcasting-...


6

So as long as you qualify for Sneak Attack, it applies. In your example, the melee attack would trigger Sneak Attack. You can even get sneak attack on an opportunity attack later in the round because it's only limited to once per turn. Sneak attack is not an attack action, it's a triggered event based on its prerequisites.


4

I think you're conflating two different things here. First, I recommend taking a look at PHB page 192. It starts a list of Actions In Combat. The first one is Attack, and the second is Cast a Spell. Typically you only get to do one of these on your turn. Attack is what you would do with your short sword, and it is indeed based on your choice of either your ...


14

You use WIS, because inflict wounds is a melee spell attack, not a melee weapon attack. It seems like you're a little unclear on the distinction, which is blurring some lines. Inflict wounds requires you to make a melee spell attack. PHB p. 205 tells us that this will use your spellcasting modifier; WIS for your Clerical spellcasting ability. Basically, it'...


3

Apparently, Not damage I asked this question to Jeremy Crawford on Twitter. The answer was a link to a previous answer he left someone else: https://twitter.com/JeremyECrawford/status/746062633632038912 No general rule causes force damage to pass from one plane of existence to another. #DnD So, even my premise is wrong. Force damage doesn't pass ...


2

Tome and Blood is the final word on those spells… probably Andy Collins, he of the Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 revision, says in the Wizards of the Coast Design and Development Web column "The Polymorph Problem" that Tome and Blood is the most recent source for the spells. I flipped through some Third Edition books post-Tome and Blood to confirm this and didn'...


1

Use Polymorph (et al.) from the 3e PHB, noting there are clarifications, but not errata, to it. The reprints in the 3.5e PHB may be superfically different, but are fundamentally the same "become a monster manual entry" that later 3.5e era errata changed


5

Infusions are spells, and there are suggestions that new spells can be designed. Those suggestions were printed in Core, and not reprinted for each new spellcasting class (including artificer) was printed, but if, say, a favored soul or wu jen can research a new spell, then so too should an artificer be able to. Of course, the real trick is convincing the ...


4

The next sentence of that FAQ entry seems to clarify the intent better - However, if a magical attack specifically mentions that it deals bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage, DR affects that damage normally, as if it were from a physical weapon. Does Aqueous Orb do bludgeoning, piercing or slashing damage? Nope. So, it is still not affected by ...


0

B/P/S means it is (or is like) a weapon, which this spell does not have, so Yes, aqueous orb would be unaffected by DR. (It wouldn't bypass it, strictly speaking, since only silver bypasses it). Once could argue the damage sure reads like bludgeoning, but it doesn't "specifically mention" it.


-1

No, The rolls happen as part of the same sequence of events Typically, when a creature can save for half damage, they are doing so at the same time you are dealing the damage. The damage rolled is applied to all creatures regardless of if they save, and any modifiers applied after (like saving for half). What you're essentially talking about boils down to ...


1

The saving throw and damage roll are independent of each other While most answers suggest that damage is rolled after the save, based on wording or "common sense", I will offer the opposing perspective: there is no sequential temporal relation between the two dice rolls. Spells that require a saving throw are either condition appliers (buffs/debuffs), or ...


-2

Multiple suggestions could do basically anything, starting with "You rather like this fellow," moving on to "You would rather like this fellow to be your friend," and then "The guilt of your actions weighs on you, and you feel you must tell someone." These should lead the NPC to tell you just about anything, so long as it feels like a natural train of ...


15

None of this works by the rules Alright, let's unpack this. A needle is not a weapon so it's an illegal target for blade of blood. It cannot even be an improvised weapon, as according to page 159, footnote 2 of Complete Warrior: If an item has no weight worth noting, it doesn't deal any damage when used as a weapon Blade of blood only deals extra ...


1

Most of modifiers affecting a regular attack would affect violent thrust. Violent thrust You must succeed on attack rolls (one per creature or object thrown) to hit the target with the items, using your base attack bonus + your Intelligence modifier (if a wizard) or Charisma modifier (if a sorcerer). Attack roll An attack roll represents your ...


1

Since all the other answers assume this is about making up spells on the spot, I'll go in a different direction and assume that this is about the player wanting something that doesn't exist. Immediate situation How to handle this as it comes up at the table really comes down to your DMing style. You can just say that he has to stick to the spells he knows ...


11

Game lore basis for verbal components: Blame Jack Vance It was assumed that the D & D spell would be primarily verbal ~ E. Gary Gygax, 1976 The original reason for verbal components had nothing to do with "the Weave." D&D 5e is an interesting mix of all editions previous to it. ... the particular combination of sounds, with specific ...


29

From the Verbal Component section of the PHB: Most spells require the chanting of mystic words. The word's themselves aren’t the source of the spell’s power; rather, the particular combination of sounds, with specific pitch and resonance, sets the threads of magic in motion. [PHB Pg 203] So the weave is sensitive to a specific combination of ...


6

109, normally To my knowledge, this is a complete list of bonuses to your dispel check: Minor School Esoterica (Abjuration): Competence bonus of half your class level to dispel checks (maximum +6 with bloodlines) Unanswerable Strike: +4 to dispel checks against abjuration spells Elven Spell Lore: +2 to dispel checks Inquisition Domain Power: +4 bonus to ...


1

As a DM it is important to keep consistency in the game to a certain degree. However unless you want something like this to be a recurring situation, I would recommend that you not allow this. Particularly in combat, players casting spells can only use the spells that they have prepared that day. However they description on he/she casted the spell could ...


9

If the player is fairly new to roleplaying and/or D&D Then this is an "understandable misunderstanding". The game of D&D doesn't work that way, and other answers lay out how it does work. Perhaps with some rare exceptions, your character sheet is expected to list every single magical ability you have. So if you aren't invoking an ability on the ...


0

In 5e, there are explicitly almost no ways of interrupting a spell being cast -- even if you're an enemy in melee combat with them. And it's that much harder if you're in a conversation not expecting them to cast. There's a feat, mage slayer, which lets you reaction-attack attack someone when they cast a spell within reach of you, like an attack of ...


-6

You should in no way force players to stay in rules, just let players happens bad things if they try to force rulse. You could as well allow new spells and threath them like regular spells, In one game I had (basically I allowed another player to become the DM and I was just giving tips) one player wanted a "lightening" spell, however he was only level 2 ...


3

No, force damage does not affect creatures on the ethereal plane. The DMG states that: solid objects on the overlapped plane don't hamper the movement of a creature in the Border Ethereal The exceptions are certain magical effects (including anything made of magical force) and living beings. This specifically relates to movement. Force damage is ...


8

RAW, No, Mending cannot remove corrosion. As written, the spell repairs things by joining together parts that have been separated. There are four specific samples given, and none of them change the properties of the material in any way. Corrosion represents a change in the substance of an item. It could no more remove corrosion than it could turn cheese ...


5

How does the caster know whether the victim made his SR? In general, only the player rolling the dice for the victim (and the DM) knows at the time whether or not he made his Saving Throw. The victim (in-game) only knows the effects that he perceives, and the caster (in-game) only knows what he perceives in turn. This is true for rolls in general, though ...


34

Change his Sorcerer template into a Wild Mage, and then have a Wild Magic surge occur as he attempts to channel internal power for an unknown release of energy. I'd like to suggest imposing an interesting alternative for this. A character is all about story, and their experience grants them levels. This creative and interesting use of a sorcerer's inner ...


3

One point that hasn't already been addressed here is why D&D's magic system cannot and should not allow spell creation on the fly. The D&D magic system is often described as "Vancian", due to its origins. There is a degree of variance in the details of spell preparation depending on the edition of D&D, but the main principle of requiring ...


3

The class feature says: When you roll lightning or thunder damage, you can use your Channel Divinity to deal maximum damage, instead of rolling. My added emphasis shows clearly that you make this decision at the time you roll the damage. Each spell that requires a saving throw tells you when the saving throw is made and how much damage applies based ...


5

Saving Throws Are Rolled First According to every "save for half" spell I've read so far, the written order of operations is each creature makes a saving throw, then damage is rolled. For example, thunderwave says (PH282–3) Each creature [in the area] must make a Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 2d8 thunder damage and is ...


2

The spell doesn't merely animate your armour. ...the armor is immediately brought to life as a Medium-sized animated object. It animates it as an animated object, which is a kind of creature. As a creature, it can fight - attack enemies, trip, disarm, flank, you name it. Your allies can ask it to move, but not control its actions otherwise. Medium ...


1

I would either rule that no, they cannot be stored, or if they are stored they fall under the following restrictions: They count as lvl 1 spells for the purposes of storing. Cantrips cast this way no longer benefit from any effect that specifies cantrips in the ruling. Cantrips cast this way take 1 action to cast. This makes it virtually useless to cast ...


31

RAW Per the existing rules as they are written, a character cannot just declare that they are casting a spell as they might declare that they are swinging a weapon. They must be precise about which spell they are casting, must have the spell slots to cast said spell, and must have it memorized (though these requirements may vary slightly between classes). ...


4

In D&D, any time a character uses a power or ability, they must be able to support it with a reference to the rules. If the player cannot point out in the book where the power or ability comes from, you are under no constraints to allow it. If you run a table that encourages creative use of power, you might allow it on a one-time basis, apply an ...


89

Unless you want to veer the rest of your game way off the way D&D 5e magic works and want to let the sorcerer ignore the major balancing factor in the class's design (limited spells known), no, you shouldn't. There's no such thing as improvised spells in the game, but once you allow it once, it is likely that the player will want to do it a lot. Just ...


21

When casting a spell, it can be cool to describe its effects rather then saying its name. For example: I point my finger at the enemy, and a bolt of energy springs in its direction. However, the DM must know what spell the PC is casting (therefore, it has to be a spell in the manual or a spell that the DM has introduced in his setting). If this is the case, ...


3

No. If a player wants to cast a spell they will have to tell you which spell it is they are trying to cast, what it does and where to find it in th books. If this spell is not on the list of spells they can cast (and they've got to have it prepared, but this does not apply to the Sorcerer) they cannot cast it. And don't count it as a makeshift weapon: they ...


7

On page 193 the PHB states: Making an Attack Whether you're striking with a melee weapon, firing a weapon at range, or making an attack roll as part of a spell, an attack has a simple structure. And on page 194 it states: If there's ever any question about whether something you're doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you're making ...


1

Firstly, whether or not water breathing is magical enough to effectively 'make' oxygen where there is none is debateable. Other answers have tried to deal with that fact, mostly concluding that it's up to you. The premise of this answer is that water breathing only allows you to breathe oxygen that is already in the water. It attempts to calculate how long a ...


-1

I doubt there's specific rules-as-written specifying the difference here. I would say the intent of the spell is that you can breathe water like everything else that can breathe water -- ie. needing to have oxygen in it. But there's nothing to say it doesn't let you breathe water regardless. Can you replace the CO2 with a poisonous gas that doesn't ...


3

I would say maybe.. All depends on interpretation how the spell actually work. If water breathing allows you to breath water trough skin, then you can use it only when your entire body is covered by water. Hence your idea wont work. If from other hand spell gives your lungs ability to extract oxygen from water, then you should be able to breath with your ...


11

Yes. See PHB p.114, "Your Spellbook." This sidebar describes all of the conditions necessary for copying a spell into your spellbook. None of the requirements (time, money, level) care about the storage medium of the spell you found.


3

There are no adverse consequences There are two different states you can be in while affected by a web: If the save fails, the creature is entangled and can’t move from its space, but can break loose by spending 1 round and making a DC 20 Strength check or a DC 25 Escape Artist check. The initial Strength check or Escape Artist check is functionally ...


-1

The gas that you breath in and out from the air and from the water are the same. Your water container will mix its soluble gas with those present in the air, and any excess of CO and CO2, or deficit of O2, will stay a problem regardless.


5

No. I believe the RAW, it doesn't allow flying. Pervious Editions Listed it. Previous edition had flying listed as a form, like aquatic form, that you could take. 3.5 version of the spell: ... and flight with wings, to a maximum speed of 120 feet for flying or 60 feet for nonflying movement. ... The implication of it being removed in this version ...


7

No for full flying. Although I have a caveat to add to this at the bottom. Full text of the Change Appearance portion of the spell provided here, emphasis provided for important bits: Change Appearance: You transform your appearance. You decide what you look like, including your height, weight, facial features, sound of your voice, hair length, ...



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