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1

Whether you adding or subtract results from dice, it tends to produce similar-looking distributions with different offsets. For instance 2d6 looks very like 1d6-1d6, except the former is centred on 7 and the latter on 0. So, an ability contest where two contestants roll 1d20+bonus, and highest wins, can be seen as looking as 1d20 - 1d20 + (difference in ...


3

It's impossible to tell this early in the game. Optimisation, like many other functionally academic activities, relies on the literature, prior writings establishing a research programme of common assumptions, language, and models-of-universe. 5e, being a wholly new mechanical framework, has none of this literature1. In prior editions, one evaluated ...


5

There's no way to get the damage in a general case, as whichever actions you should choose depend on the circumstances and it's impossible to know the circumstances ahead of time. You can calculate the damage amounts based on certain assumptions, though. For example, if you assume you'll have advantage about every other turn, just take the average of the ...


4

This is quite tricky to do, there is no direct formula, but there are some ways to aggregate results to avoid having to check all 68 possibilities. I think the formula is too complex to discuss on rpg.stackexchange. AnyDice can do this, and it looks like it is coded with a reasonably efficient algorithm. My Ruby gem games_dice can also do this, and might ...


8

http://anydice.com/ will do this quite easily for you: Roll 8 drop lowest 3 (which is just keep highest five) : output [highest 5 of 8d6] Click "at least" to see the probability of getting 20+, which is 79.97%


15

Trying to do this old school (no programs, just statistics and probability 101), it won't be short, but should be very informative (I'll add a summery later on). To help making this more vivid, let's consider 3 characters: "Fumbles" - he is really unlucky or unskilled, so he gets a -5 modifier. "Average Joe" (or just "Joe") - no modifiers. "Rambo" - he is ...


0

Anydice can handle this, but it requires a little bit of actual programming. Here is a link to a program that I think does the correct calculations for "roll 3 dice, take the highest 2, and count the number of successes against a target." To visualize what's actually going on, you'll want to click on [graph] and [transpose]; it'll plot the percentage ...


0

Please Look at Probabilities I like using anydice.com, mostly because it's free and you can access it from any computer connected to the internet. Dice (and Probability) can be a fickle and often unintuitive thing (the Monty Hall Problem is a good example of how unintuitive simple probability can be). You should always do the math and quantitatively find ...



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