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16

@LegendaryDude has provided a solid answer about the effect on the numbers, however, what is more important is what those numbers mean in play. A larger standard deviation means that there will be more extreme results, in a sense, while there is overall no change to the average, individual rolls are "more random". Randomness hurts PCs more than monsters ...


8

I simulated a million stat arrays with each method. I sorted each array, then took the average. Here's what I got: with 3d6×12 method : 10.8 11.5 12.2 12.9 13.9 15.2 with 4d6 method : 8.5 10.4 11.8 13.0 14.2 15.7 So, with the 3d6×12 method, your best stat will be on average 15.2. With the 4d6 method it will be on average 15.7. ...


7

It might be true that the 3d6 method will get you more total modifiers on average, but I think it is important to note that if one is building a Wizard and truly min-maxing, that player would be hoping to roll a single 17 or 18 most of all. The probability to roll an 18 on a 3d6 is 0.46% (1/216), and in 12 rolls that chance increases to 5.42%. The ...


50

Given the example of (2d6)*2 (henceforth referred to as 'Doubled Damage') vs (4d6) (referred to as 'Doubled Dice'): When you double the damage rolled instead of doubling the dice rolled, you create a more evenly distributed curve. Using either method, you have the best odds of rolling the average damage for the dice you are using but in the doubled damage ...



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