Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Yes, it is perfectly acceptable and possible to make a d3 from a d6. If the desired dice is a divisor of the actual dice, you can apply the modulo function to it to get the desired dice. For example, rolling a d6 % 3 will give you a d3. Roll a 1: 1 % 3 = 1 -- thats a 1. Roll a 2: 2 % 3 = 2 -- thats a 2. Roll a 3: 3 % 3 = 0 -- thats a 3. Just bear with me ...


1

Your intuition is correct - you can use a d6 to simulate a d3 or d2 by assigning the sides of the d6 to the numbers 1 and 2, or 1, 2 and 3. If you find yourself needing a d2 or d3 a lot, and don't feel 100% comfortable with making the substitution, you can simply take a d6 and repaint its sides. For example, paint the 6 to show 1, the 5 to show 2, and the 4 ...


6

Substituting by multiplication and division is easy. What you can't do is substitute by adding and subtracting. Others have gone into the basic explanation here. You can also do it with exponentiation and roots, but if give each die its own meaning. For this to work, the number of sides on the large die has to be a power of the number of sides on the small ...


1

You can absolutely do that. Cut the value in half (round up) or take the value mod 3 and add one. There is another option, however. In this case, it's odious, but it can be a useful tool: you can always simulate a small die with a larger die. If, for example, you found yourself in need of a d3, rolling a d4 and rerolling 4s will do fine. Rerolling can be a ...


9

Yes you can by choosing a die that is multiple of the one your are trying to simulate and then divide, as explained by some of the others. If you don't want to perform any calculations, you can also use any die with more sides than the one your are trying to simulate, and reroll when you roll higher than the die you are trying to simulate. So, you can use ...


10

Yes, you can and are intended to do that, division has no other effect on the probability distribution. You can use any other die with sides divisible by your target die size (so you can use a d6 both as a d3 and d2 safely, for example).


34

The d3 is a rare die, and the d2 is a coin. Substituting a D3 can be done with any die whose total number of faces can be divided by 3. These include in your case the d6 and the d12. The easiest way to do this is to use a d6 and say the following: 1 → 1, 2 2 → 3, 4 3 → 5, 6 Or in other words, divide by 2, rounded up. You can also work in cycles, with one ...


4

There is no such thing as a d3 or a d2, except for very specialised dice. What you're supposed to do with these dice is take a d4 or d6, and use half the result of each side, rounding up. (Or for a d2, just flip a coin.) It is the same with a d5, substituting a d10.


1

I'm a math guy and I know most people aren't so I'll spare the gritty details unless someone actually wants to see a proof. Suppose you have a die of size X (a dX , if you will). Great Weapon Fighting will increase the average roll on your die by 1-(2/X). So the bigger the die, the more your average damage increases, although this increase can never be ...



Top 50 recent answers are included