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3

RAW, probably not. However, as I DM, I would personally rule that they are. The shared Fey Ancestry is a small point in the half-elves favour, but, historically (in 3.5 anyway), half-species have counted as both parent species for effects that target race.


9

A half-elf needs to roll a saving throw to avoid being paralyzed Elves and half-elves in 5e share a common trait: Fey Ancestry You have advantage on saving throws against being charmed, and magic can't put you to sleep But this says nothing about paralysis, so in this case we are looking at a specific rule about elves and undead in the MM, and ...


7

It's very hard to detect the difference. You can just use 3d6 or something similarly simple, because you won't really notice a difference Let's pretend you have two ways of determining the result of tests like the one Jill is participating in. One of them generates results from an ideal normal distribution. The other is a small handful of dice, say 3d6. You ...


4

If what you're wanting is more granularity than, say, 3d6 provides, then use whatever distribution curve you like, express the probability of success p as a decimal between 0 and 1, and success is defined as rolling a fraction smaller than p using d10 (or d20 ignoring tens digit) as many rounds as necessary to either reach the stated precision or know that ...


1

Unfortunately, much of our universe appears to be quantized. One could imagine a system wherein, instead of rolling dice, you precisely measured the net magnetic spin of some ideal gas on non-interacting magnetic moments each of either spin up (1) or spin down (-1). Theoretically such a property, when measured many times, should form a gaussian ...


3

Yes, this exists... sort of. I say "sort of" because you're assuming that continuous probabilities are possible to generate, when it is physically impossible to do so. (All random number generators, both digital and physical, can only produce discrete numbers, even if there are so many that the curve looks smooth; and the results from physically-contnuous ...


14

Ultimately, your “normal-distribution random number generator” is neither random nor normally-distributed. It’s also not actually continuous; all numbers in a computer are always going to be discrete. Any system that rolls a number of equally-sized dice and sums them up is more-or-less approximately normal (see also: central limit theorem). More dice ...


-1

The head to head contest of rs conley is wrong: There is an website called anydice.com that do dice probabilities. You can find the "at least" problablilities of 1d20 and 3d6, this means the probabilities of rolling certain number or higher. On a 1d20 the chance of rolling at least 1 is 100% and the chance of rolling 3 on a 3d6 is 100%. An 18 on both ...



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