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2

Are you asking because you want to learn how to use manydice? Or you want a tool that can produce the answer? The following formulas should be pasted into Excel, you can then tinker with what happens if you give one person extra skill etc. This first paragraph are your headings. Note that I have left spaces in columns J and T for separation, so A1 should ...


3

Here's an AnyDice program that should do it. It calculates both the distribution of the raw die roll, given your explosion and fumble mechanics, as well as the distribution of the number of successes for a given Skill+Stat+Mod bonus. For example, for a bonus of 2+2+0 = 4, I get the following probabilities: # of successes | probability (%) ...


0

It almost seems like you're expecting "exploding dice," which is where when you roll the max on one die. If you had to get values via exploding dice (eg if you could not roll the second die if you didn't roll a 0 aka 10 on the first die, and couldn't roll the third die if you didn't roll a 0 on the second die), then you'd be in a completely different ...


6

The question in your heading doesn't match the question(s) in the body. The answer to the heading is, No, you don't choose. The answer to the body is, Yes, you are correct. BAB 10/5 refers to the first and second attacks (with the primary weapon). The offhand gets a single attack, at BAB 10. As noted, penalties apply to the final Attack Bonus, for ...


5

AceCalhoon's answer has the numbers, but I think it is useful to illustrate it with probability graphs. Here is how the probability distributions of two common damage dice, d12 and 2d6, change. D12: The results 1 and 2 simply become very unlikely, boosting the probability of the rest. 2D6: Here the effect doesn't look linear. 2-5 all become much less ...


9

I've forgotten the formal proof for this, but hopefully this is correct: Consider a D6 (for the sake of concrete language). When you roll a 1, you reroll the die and keep the result. This produces an average value of 3.5, and happens 1/6 of the time. When you roll a 2, you reroll the die and keep the result (even if it's lower). This produces an average ...



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