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20

D&D 3.5's definition of the paralyzed status reads (emphases mine) A paralyzed character is frozen in place and unable to move or act. A paralyzed character has effective Dexterity and Strength scores of 0 and is helpless, but can take purely mental actions So when paralyzed, you can't speak (referring to question #2), as that would be an action, ...


18

Yes, a prone immobilized creature can stand up. The definition for Immobilized could seem a little fuzzy upon first reading: When a creature is immobilized, it can’t move, unless it teleports or is pulled, pushed, or slid. Until you note that Move is explicitly defined: Any instance of movement, whether it is done willingly or unwillingly. ...


17

The first and third points aren’t really big deals; actually, the third point would be a disadvantage of save-or-dies. Would be, if the numbers were more reasonable. By the numbers: you can probably make someone fail a saving throw Ultimately, caster classes have every reason to pump their save DCs as much as they can. The ability score that sets the ...


12

Dominated is defined quite specifically in the rules: The creature can't take actions voluntarily. Instead the dominator chooses a single action for the creature to take on the creature's turn: a standard, a move, a minor or a free action. The only powers or game features that the dominator can make the creature use are ones that can be used at will, ...


11

For an always-drunk NPC, you have a number of options. First, simply "de-level" an NPC of higher level, to represent the overall poor effects of being drunk. In a more complex mode, have the monster be 2 levels higher than the appropriate monster for the level, but impose the following conditions. Traits Aura 1: [The NPC] and any ally in the aura ...


11

Mobs tend to not be very effective in 3.5 As you noted, the orcs were torn to shreds. The party had powerful, area-affecting debuffs available, and used them. Meanwhile, due to the extreme degree to which the orcs outnumbered the PCs (5:1), we expect that the orcs were commensurately low-level (the CR guidelines would suggest that their numbers alone ...


10

The blinded condition doesn't do that. Blinded The creature can’t see, which means its targets have total concealment against it. The creature takes a -10 penalty to Perception checks. The creature grants combat advantage. The creature can’t flank. A blinded creature cannot have combat advantage against anyone. (RC229) People can ...


10

Monster Manual 3 solos tend to use one of a few tricks to deal with this. Any one of them is pretty good; using multiples might be a bit much. Give the solos saves at the start of their turn. If you do this, that saving throw probably shouldn't get the +5 bonus to saves. You can also tune this down a bit by only letting them make one save. Allow the solos ...


9

So if a player wanted to stand, spending the move action, but not moving because its not leaving the adjacent square. Does this meet the requirements for ending the ongoing damage? No, it doesn't meet the requirement for ending the ongoing damage. The description for Reaving Damage you quoted says the following: that enemy also takes ongoing 5 ...


9

You take damage at the start of your turn. You make a saving throw at the end of your turn, unless something or someone grants you a saving throw. For example, Boots of Free Movement which have the following power: Encounter (Minor Action) Make a saving throw against a slow, immobilize, or restrain effect that a save can end. Note that you ...


8

I love @KRyan's post, but I think some numbers really help illustrate the effect here. 2nd-level party vs. 15 Goblins Your Sorcerer catches them in a Color Spray. Every Goblin who fails is basically out of the fight for 3d4+1 rounds or so. Sorcerer's DC is 15, the Goblins have a Will save of -1. On average 75% (11) of the Goblins drop. But the ...


6

You take ongoing damage at the start of your turn. You make the saving throw at the end of your turn.


6

If I've got your wrist in one of my hands, you're grabbed. If I've got a rope around your belly, again, grabbed. If I've got both your wrists behind your back, you're restrained. If my rope is pinning your arms, you're probably restrained.


6

You'd use restrained over grabbed in circumstances where the victim isn't just prevented from moving away, but also otherwise inconvenienced. (That's where the -2 and "grants combat advantage" come in.) Consider "held firmly by the arm" and "wrapped up in animated vines."


6

It sounds like you have a very acceptable fire-focused intention. I suspect one of the things that is complicating matters is the fact that: The Mage Wizard can select 2 Encounter powers per level, so that offers some variety. It helps that the DM lets us waive the restrictions on the number of powers we can use per day. I think that's why he makes the ...


6

Yes, he is losing that round. Unfortunately a stunned character cannot do any action. If your GM allows it, you can rule-bend it and be able to do some non-actions, like the 5-foot step. From http://www.d20srd.org/srd/combat/actionsInCombat.htm Not an Action Some activities are so minor that they are not even considered free actions. They literally ...


5

Sly Flourish recently wrote a blog entry with new monster powers one of which, Brutal Shakeoff, is designed to let solos shake off status effects rather than get locked down. In brief, the solo can sacrifice HP to save. That blog is a great source of other monster fixes and optimizations, check it out.


5

Yes. Being immobilized only prevents you from moving out of your current space. If someone is standing in your space with you, however, you must shift out of your space to stand from prone, and this is disallowed by being immobilized.


5

There are two rules in the RC that inform this particular situation. The first is the rule about overlapping durations (227): When a creature is subject to identical effects that end at different times, it ignores all but the effect that has the most time remaining....Effects that a save can end (labeled “save ends”) work differently, since it’s not ...


5

No. The Rules Compendium on page 92 says "Sequence: The order of entries in a power description is a general guide to the sequence in which the power's effects occur." So as Mind Break says: "Hit: 1d8 + Intelligence modifier psychic damage, and the target gains vulnerability to psychic damage equal to your Charisma modifier until the end of your next ...


4

Well I know there is a stop against delaying turn to avoid the effects of save-ends or until end of your next turn effects. End of Turn when the Creature Delays: At the moment the creature delays, any effect that it has been sustaining ends. In addition, effects that last until the end of the creature’s turn now end if they are beneficial to it and its ...


4

YES This is a perfect example of what Readying an Action is meant to accomplish. Likewise, you could ready a move action until after you save against Immobilized (save ends) or even until after a "Slowed until the end of your turn" effect from a monster ends. Quite simply, it's not exploitative, for at least four reasons: You can fail your saving throw ...


4

No, they can't save again. The creature you choose with Dark Reach of Xevut "gains the effect that the target saved against." It doesn't give them a new effect, but the same effect. The rules are clear: one saving throw per end of turn per effect. Compendium - Saving Throws: (emphasis mine) If a creature is subject to an effect that a save can end, the ...


4

My best method is this: Give everyone a sheet of plastic (like you would get in sheet covers, twenty for a dollar where I am), and a dry erase marker. Have them put tic marks next to a status' duration and its effect right under it, and they can use their finger to erase tic marks when their turn gets to them. There is a wide enough margin on the sheet to ...


3

Unless the creatures are hiding, the locations of all creatures are known to all other creatures. Bright light means that everything in the room is visible. provided it's not concealed in some other way. Dim light provides light obscuration which provides partial concealment against folks without low light vision. That's a -2 penalty to attack rolls. ...


3

No, they cannot save again as Dark Reach of Xevut applies the effect to another enemy. The power's description says: One enemy within 3 squares of the target gains the effect that the target saved against. This indicates an enemy distinct from the one that saved against the effect. Power descriptions are very explicit in who can be / is targeted by a ...


3

A common way this is managed is a chit or counter attached to the mini(s). If you are using a white/chalkboard or paper, just writing an abbreviation next to the individual in question may work as well.


3

Standing up does not work in this case The criterion for removing the ongoing damage is not merely spending a move action, but spending a move action to remove the effect. Standing up is spending a move action to stand up, not spending a move action to end the ongoing damage.


3

I've just acquired Blood and Smoke for Vampire: The Requiem, which has the same list of Conditions. It says that the resolution for Obsession is: The character sheds or purges her fixation. Being run out of town seems like a perfectly good reason to "shed" or "purge" your Obsession with finding supernatural activity there. It doesn't look like it costs ...


2

My technique for handling this situation is this: If the players have a method for locking down a solo monster (or any monster, really) and I don't have any means for countering it, I just let it happen and don't sweat it. Some players have obviously invested a certain amount of time and effort developing their characters into being able to do this exact ...



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