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28

I'm often unable to find where my cat is sleeping, so I'd say yes, sleeping characters can still be hidden. I'd say have the character make a single hide check when they go to sleep to establish a DC (you should probably throw in a negative circumstance modifier since they won't be able to adapt to circumstances like an active, conscious hider would). ...


26

Depending on the context of the encounter, the following might be relevant: Surprise If surprised, you lose your turn for the first round of combat. This includes loosing use of any reaction for one round, measured from the beginning of combat until the start of your turn on round two. Which I got from this quick reference: ...


25

Used to be that RAW, the sniper wasn't getting the sneak attack. Why? No good reason other than that "a legalistic reading of the rules said so." There are no end of huge threads on paizo.com going over in tortuous detail how vision and stealth and all that work in PF core, especially here and here, and the summary was "slavishly following the rules means ...


25

Flight does indeed require Move Silently checks. (If, of course, you're trying to not make noise.) This is backed up in the rules by the entry for Giant Owl, which states: When in flight, giant owls gain a +8 bonus on Move Silently checks.


22

You've already stated the key point: 1 reaction, which you take when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell. So what you need to understand here is that the Shield spell involves time travel. No, really, it does. You can cast Shield when you're hit by an attack. Not when you're targeted, or when someone tries to attack you, but ...


20

There is no rule that says that flying allows you to move silently. The entry for Move Silently simply says that you move, it doesn't say how. You're dealing with noise issues such as the rustle of clothing and the creaking of equipment, as well as your own ability to step silently and not breathe loudly. That said, some of the terrain modifiers wouldn't ...


20

RAW the Rogue does receive the benefits of Expertise to his passive. A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn’t involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors over and over again, or can be used when the DM wants to secretly determine ...


19

There is no Hidden Club in 5e Hidden Club was invented to explain the tightly-interlocking mechanics that determined whether a D&D 4e character had the Hidden status. The very first premise of 4e's Rules of Hidden Club is the all-caps and repeated statement that everyone always knows where everyone else is. It's repeated and text-shouted because it's ...


18

An invisible creature is not hidden. All creatures are fully aware of which square/location it is in, therefore it remains on the battle mat. This is one of the core Rules of Hidden Club. The First Premise: Everyone knows where everyone else is, at all times, period. The Second Premise: There is one and only one exception to The First Premise, and that ...


18

On Page 58 of the Lost Mine of Phandelver in the D&D Starter Set. Goblins have a ability called Nifty Escape that allows them to disengage or hide as a bonus action. Like D&D 4e the 5e monster stat block spells out any special abilities and exception to the normal rules.


16

Yes To be hidden, you must meet the following requirements: Have total concealment/superior cover from at least one foe (being out of line of sight is included in these: it's superior cover, essentially). Make a Stealth check and beat the passive perception of your foe. It is absolutely possible to be hidden from certain foes and not from others. You ...


16

Stealth is fun. Shadowdancer may be one of the most popular Prestige Classes in 3.5e, and that is solely due to the Hide in Plain Sight feat. Many players enjoy the thought of sneaking invisibly to the enemy and rolling insane backstab/sneak attack damage. Unfortunately, stealth in D&D is not always that fun. Now, the backstab part is awesome, and ...


15

No, cover and concealment do not normally influence each other. Cover and concealment are different properties. Cover is derived from interrupted lines of effect: The target is around a corner or protected by terrain. For example, the target might be in the same square as a small tree, obscured by a small pillar or a large piece of furniture, or behind ...


15

You are correct, generally, you cannot hide behind another PC or creature and make a stealth check. However, lightfoot halflings can (they make great rogues for this reason) if the creature is one size larger than them (which includes medium sized PCs). The skulker feat though, does not allow hiding behind PCs. It allows hiding in "lightly obscured" areas, ...


14

Check out Pathfinder's rules for Surprise in Combat. In short, the one shooting his longbow starts "Combat Mode", but he gets a surprise round, in which only he, and anyone who rolled high enough Perception to be aware of the attack, can act. If it's something done completely in stealth, the GM can rule that everyone is surprised. The attack can then be ...


14

First off, that map is infamous in my gaming group. It's from "Keep on the Shadowfell," an adventure published before even the 4e PHB. As such, it's got a lot of... quirks, and then the Stealth rules changed in the PHB2 (see Sage's link at the bottom for full details of current rules). The party is supposed to enter from the West (left) and so the kobolds ...


14

Hidden creatures never provoke opportunity attacks. If they enter Hidden from Create a diversion to hide, they'll be fine. From the DDI Compendium: Hidden When a creature is hidden from an enemy, the creature is silent and invisible to that enemy. A creature normally uses the Stealth skill to become hidden. See also invisible. Invisible If ...


14

The GM actually spells that out. He says "Goblins, because they are particularly stealthy, can use their bonus action to hide." Presumably, goblins have a racial feature that works like the Rogue's Cunning Action and allows them to use a bonus action to make a Hide action.


13

Stealth isn't a defined condition in 4e. Using the stealth action, on a success, makes the character Invisible and Hidden. For details on the difference, see this question. These conditions inherently have no special effect on Marking. If you were marked when you become invisible or hidden or both, you are still marked and it ends however it normally ...


13

I don't think a sleeping character can normally hide while sleeping. What one can do though is hide before going to sleep. Quoting from the skills section in the SRD (emphasis mine): When your character uses a skill, you make a skill check to see how well he or she does. If you hide yourself when you go to sleep, then that's when you make the skill ...


12

Ok, crazy thing about the difference between hidden and invisible...there isn't much of one. The big difference between the two is the ability to be attacked directly. If you are hidden, your enemy doesn't know your location, and thus cannot target you directly. They have to guess (DM should use some kind of randomization here), and may or may not actually ...


11

How important is the Japanese/ninja specific part to you, and how important is "all subterfuge" in terms of class options? And do you want modern day or 1800s or "made up fantasy" as your setting? Depending on whether you demand the Oriental flavor and whether you're looking for a modern setting or not, there are a number of espionage RPGs that are all ...


11

A Shadowdancer isn't simply hiding: she's using a Supernatural ability to not be seen while not having anything to hide behind – she's not actually in the shadow, she remains in plain sight but unseen. True Seeing will work on her. A Ranger is simply hiding. His Extraordinary ability allows him to disappear into natural terrain while being observed, but ...


11

1. How does this work against creatures with darkvision considering they can see perfectly in dim light? It works exactly the same for several reasons. Firstly the Shadowdancer isn't even ~in~ the area of dim light, they're standing in plain sight so normally anyone could see them. Secondly the shadows aren't what are hiding the shadowdancer, the shadows ...


11

Miscellaneous tricks that should make a Wizard (or in most cases, anyone) move more silently: Get a Collar of Umbral Metamorphosis (Tome of Magic). Grants a move silently bonus as the least of its abilities, the others include Hide in Plain Sight. Get some Silent Moves armor for up to +15 circumstance to move silently. Use ASF lowering techniques for best ...


10

According to the DMG... Probably not. "Gotcha!" Abilities: Pay attention to monster abilities that change the basic rules and tactics of combat and give players the cues they need to recognize them. Describe the ability as it might appear in the game world, and then describe it in game terms to make it clear. For example, if the characters are ...


10

This is a great guide to all things hiding and hidden in 4e. The gist of it is that you need Superior Cover or Total Concealment to become hidden. Superior cover is defined as 3 or more lines from corner to corner from your square to the target square are obstructed. Total Concealment is things like invisibility, dense fog, or total darkness.


10

The blinded condition doesn't do that. Blinded The creature can’t see, which means its targets have total concealment against it. The creature takes a -10 penalty to Perception checks. The creature grants combat advantage. The creature can’t flank. A blinded creature cannot have combat advantage against anyone. (RC229) People can ...


10

The designers could've gone nuts trying to come up with specific rules on this, because it's a situation that's subject to so many potential modifiers. Personally, I'd handle the general case as a Perception check...you're trying to observe your potential targets for signs that they might know you're there. And unless those targets have some reason to ...


9

This ruling is clearer now. Being hidden is still on a per-individual basis, and so the basic answer is still you have combat advantage against anyone whose passive Perception you beat. But there are now rulings about pointing out hidden creatures to others. I'm not sure exactly when it changed, but the Compendium glossary on Perception now says: If a ...



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