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23

In real history, almost no land except impassible mountains and deep desert wasn't settled, and there are exceptions even then. The population of the world during the European medieval age was much lower than today, but widely spread out in all the known habitable regions of Earth. Take that, and now add powerful, inimical monsters to the wilderness. ...


18

Would adventurers arise if treasure was about... To your first question, yes. Though it is more about "dungeons filled with treasure" then necessarily the magic or the monsters. People tend to seek ways to make profits, especially if those can be made quickly. People are willing to take on risky endeavors to do so. Today, in the "First World", we tend ...


16

Enlist the help of your Creative Player to involve the others. CP is very creative and he is clearly motivated with the game. Explain him you have to focus on the other players and use hooks for them, so he could help you creating those hooks, being in character (he ask the other PCs favours that involve them) or totally out of character (he makes up that ...


14

Either through high mortality rates, copious amounts of backstory, or actual force of personality, some characters become more "main" than others. This is something you should be taking advantage of. There are a few things you can do: Ask for more holes in backstory to make a common backstory for other characters. ("We both defended the City of ...


13

"Adventurers" in the real world Real-world "adventurers" engage in: Trade. A lot of human activity is based on the exchange of stuff for other stuff that you want more. Exploration. Mainly to open up new opportunities for trade. Depending on the era, an explorer might be motivated by the desire to stake out their own land claims, rewards from patrons, or ...


11

The Closest 'Real World' Equivalent to DnD Adventurers is the Noble Class One of the best, and only, ways to enter the Noble class from the peasantry was to be so ridiculously puissant at combat that you were given a command - and from that tiny band of men, achieved so much so prominently and notably that you were given a higher rank, and so forth. Saving ...


10

In some eras of Medieval Europe, there was a military unit known as a lance. It is like a squad, but also mirrors adventuring parties really well. This is especially true if you consider some of the attributes of lances: Everyone had a role or specialization within the lance (the knight, page, crossbowmen, the dude with the bill-hook, etc.) Basic lances ...


8

Push your PCs together. You can do this several ways. Your excitable player is going to be the most vocal person at the table no matter what, so to involve the other players, make his vocalizations be with them. Call for a scene. "This is going to impact Simon the Mage, let's see the scene where you two talk about it." If your excitable player's new ...


7

For the simple reason: Because when you add dungeons full of loot, this becomes the 'gold rush'. The get-rich-quick that doesn't work for 95% of the people who try it. For the complex reason: Unless you're doing some house-ruled system with a lot of differences in how things work, fantasy worlds are not usually analogous to medieval Europe. Yes, it ...


5

Ask the other players what they think is cool about their characters. Have them explain why they made the character, and what matters to them about him/her/it. Ask them why their character is awesome. Look at their character sheets. You'll find flags there, details that directly tells you what they think is awesome, and what they want the story of their ...


5

It doesn't always matter Long story short, I have played a Pathfinder campaign where my Ranger was mostly a support character, and I still really enjoyed playing the campaign. I intentionally didn't seek out the "spotlight", so to speak, so naturally - over the course of many sessions - one of the other characters got sucked into a conspiracy and my Ranger ...


5

Just to add to some very very good answers, here are my 2 pence. Talk with them RPGs are a group activity, an activity in which a group of friends come and talk with each other about fictional characters. The main thing here is the "talking" part and from here I believe that your solution should come. Talk with them after the session; understand why they ...


4

This can be a real problem. Players can get very excited about the character they've created, and completely neglect the fact that, as a player, it is their responsibility as well as yours to make the campaign interesting for the other players - not just for themselves. Your player is excited, which is always good, but perhaps a bit more excited about ...


4

Does it follow that if you introduce magic and monsters guarding dungeons filled with treasure into a historical medieval setting, you'll see an adventuring class emerge? Why not? If the prospect of pay for fighting other humans is incentive to mercenaries irl, then being paid as much as you could carry in gold, gems and magic items, doubly so in ...


3

Consider the Vikings, who had neither a feudal system nor countries in any meaningful sense. Being attacked. whether by neighbours or by wild animals, was such a common threat that most men and some women learned to fight, and acquired the equipment to do so. Those settlements that had enough of a fighting force to defend themselves succesfully even at the ...


3

If everything else fails you can try a technique, I thought up: Give players who feel ignored a prologue. That is a short setup specifically designed for their character. It's usually for a single character although they may choose to involve others short, say 10-15 minutes the first in game thing to happen that evening, e.g. while waiting for the pizza ...


2

Fictize the act of plot generation. What does this mean? It means create a fictional reason for the players to tell you the kind of information you're looking for. It's best to make it something subjective, that way you can either roll with it or change it, and still be "right". Here are some examples: "Abner, you have a dream that wakes you up in the ...


2

First tell your players your desire. "I would like that the plot would be driven by you, so if you have any ideas, tell me". Ask often your players what they want to do between adventures or plots. Give the PCs the opportunity to know interesting NPCs that can help them to accomplish their goals. Reward player initiative with cool plots, attention to ...


2

Your suggestions in here are great, actually, but I hope that I may still have something to offer for you. Questions Questions are one of the easiest and most useful tricks for generating plot hooks. Ask your players some questions about what they feel, how they met, their family and the like at the start, and you've got your first few adventures. It ...


2

Player buy-in Allowing players to mold the scenes (and scenery) Player control over certain NPCs Starting all of the above as early as possible I am currently running a game of Unknown Ponies: Failure is Awesome (a My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic spinoff game of Unknown Armies), and I've set the campaign far enough in the future from the show's ...


1

According to a documentary which I saw (it was about swords) men in Europe during the 1600-1800s would always walk around with a sword. Duels were common. A scar on your face was a mark of manhood. Fencing academies were commonplace. People used to walk around armed a lot more than they do now.


1

Run with the plot hooks they give you. Better yet, run with everything they give you, not just the deliberate plot hooks. And when I say run with these things, I mean make them important. Tie them into the main plot. Shuffle your unrevealed plots and NPCs around to match what the players give you. It's lovely to give the players 30 extra minutes of ...


1

I have participated in several Ars Magica sagas with multiple GMs. In the largest, I was the fifth of 6. The Alpha Storyguide had the biggest secrets to keep, and since we had a planned climax it worked well. In another saga there were at least two of us with recurring plots. It was easy to stay away from each other's territory.


1

You could offer something in exchange (apart from typical avenge/find lost family) - an item that improves with character level or some unique abilities/skills that develop with the story. The players will be very happy to provide interesting and elaborate hooks to get their freebies. The players may be asked to: design a quest required to improve their ...



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