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11

The villain is villainous because they do bad stuff™, but the villain is hated for other reasons. The villain does not have to be exceptionally evil/villainous (i.e. does not have to be trying to destroy The Kingdom/The World/The Multiverse), but give the players lots of petty reasons to dislike the villain. Some examples: Let the villain make a habit ...


5

I think the key question that needs to be addressed is do you want your players to hate the villain or your characters? If the players themselves find the villain depraved, they'll end up finding reasons why their characters should go after them. For example, I have a player that absolutely loves animals. Regardless of the character they play, if you ...


5

My best villains are based off the what the players care about. I'll talk about methods and some recent (in the last 3-4 years) examples. You may want to check out my 7 Types of Antagonists as well. What the players care about - Flags So first off, I tend to play games with explicit mechanics for the players to tell me what kinds of conflicts they're ...


3

The following is from an article by Justin Alexander, found here. I won't re-post the entire thing, but this excerpt is the core of the article's thoughts. The main article goes on to refer to examples in media where the hero and villain dynamic is developed well (or not) and why, as well as giving some game table examples. It's part of the "Don't Prep ...


1

What matters is why your players hate the villain. If they hate her because she always manages to defeat the player characters no matter what they do, that's bad. An all-powerful villain really isn't much fun to go against. Let the players defeat the villain from time to time. Give them the impression they're making the villain work for her victories, ...



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