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2

Similar to the 'Wing it' answer, but not quite the same. Introducing, prepared winging it. Don't prepare "what is going to happen", because this can change when the players do something you don't expect. Spend this time instead preparing "Who is nearby, what motivates them?". This is constant and the players can't mess it up. So to take an example. Where ...


2

You can change the type of prep you do, and think more in terms of preparing the region around the party, and the world, and being ready to handle most things the players might do, rather than preparing adventures and sessions per se. If you can prepare regions of your world so that they are fun and interesting to explore by themselves, then you don't need ...


8

In general, I've found the solution to this problem is to prepare too much, rather than too little. It's easier to say "We'll pick this up next week" rather than "Well, that's all I've got for tonight; who want to play Xbox?" Since you indicate that your strengths lie more in planning than in improvisation (mine too), some specific techniques to help the ...


3

Try to have some notes on rough ideas, have random encounters ready, One group a friend of mine ran. The party reached the huge Dungeon doors leading to the main quest, They were Metal possibly Made of Mithril. They took them off their hinges and sold them in the nearest town. Then set up a river trading setup running their purchased barges up and down ...


9

Wing It This may not be the most technical answer, but I have exactly the same problem as you do. My group can be so erratic when it comes to doing what I think they're going to do as well as the time it takes. I elected to do what you've already mentioned, and write in between sessions, basing what you think off of their last decisions. It helps to keep ...


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In all honesty it sounds like your GM is a bit in over his head. There are 2 things that you should do there. As stated already by Z.MOE you can help him by formulating out your actions with details imposed there and try to get him to react. Although as it sounds it could very probably be that your GM is not experienced enough for that approach. In this ...


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DO stuff... sounds strange right? But, actually it's the fastest way to immersion. When he says "you enter the inn," you make a whole bunch of assumptions about the inn right away: "I saunter up to the bar, slap down a gold piece and leer at the most attractive barmaid." You just fleshed out his inn. Maybe the next player says, "Not me, I pull a chair up ...



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