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40

The way I've always seen this done is to simply let everyone look over all the characters, and then let them decide among themselves who plays what. I guess this could lead to problems if there were two players who absolutely insisted on having the same character, but I've never witnessed that being an issue. More likely, one of them will just say "I ...


21

As I see it you have 2 main issues: Spotlight Hogging and disconnect on world/tone Share the spotlight Emphasize to the player (and the rest of the table) that everyone will get their time in the spotlight, but that they should act in a supporting role when its not their turn. Its totally fine for the PC/Player to want to have moments worth of song (or ...


16

Get feedback from your players. Set aside the last five minutes (or more) of the session to talk to the players: how do they think the game is going, what do they think will happen next, what can I do better, and what went well? Between the lines, you can determine what the players want (if they don't come out and say it). If the players aren't interested ...


16

From Experience I wish I could point you to a guide, but alas, I must rely on my own experience introducing people to role playing. There are a few things to help people get into the swing of things: Directly address the social contract, and how the game is going to work. This is really basic. I usually address this by saying something like: "We're going ...


13

Ask Her There are a lot of possible causes for why she could be bored. Maybe it turns out she doesn't like roleplaying, or doesn't like the system, or is lost in what is a fairly complicated ruleset and tunes out. That last one is important. 3.5 is a complex game. Newbies can easily get overwhelmed, especially when surrounded by veteran players who know ...


11

You've run into a common problem - "Party RPGs with non-Party Characters". Same Page Tool can't fix groups who want different things, and it also can't fix game design that works against it's own game premise. You have a few options: Class Limiting "Hey, we're playing X kind of game and these classes/types in this game don't fit that. Can we just ...


10

The reason the rolls seems unfair is a problem called Goblin Dice. When talking about combat, d20 decide if a goblin lives or dies - but we all know sooner or later he will kick the bucket. When we use d20 to determine the success of one-of-a-kind events (like making a bluff check, a diplomacy check or a riddle-solving check), the high variability of the ...


10

I think maybe you are overthinking it a little. In the past, when I did this, I have assigned each player the character that I thinks he's going to play better, or I think will be more interesting to him. That's because I have very mutual trust with my players. But that way you can assign the simplest characters to the more novice players (e.g: leaving ...


9

I can understand switching to a different character once, like, you didn't understand the system or the campaign, and you didn't realize what kind of character would be a good fit for you. But repeatedly doing it, after just a few sessions? It's time to sit down with the player and have a hard talk. "What do you want from this game? Here is what ...


9

When I've engaged in this, it's usually because I've made a series of NPCs. When not thinking, I tend to form character requirements for maximum conflict-safety. (Not to say invulnerability within the mechanics of combat, but boring characters who don't want anything and thus have no reason for drama or narrative engagement.) Thus, because they are boring, ...


9

To the extent its not disrupting things, let him be cool People come to role playing for different reasons and enjoy different things about it. If he wants to be "cool", and it is not disruptive, I would let him. It seems to be something he enjoys, so let him have fun with it. Dealing with disruption The problem comes with the fact that his actions ...


8

I'm assuming your players already understand the basic concept of roleplaying. The Ground Rules of Roleplaying Tell your players that roleplaying is supposed to be fun. They should do what they think is fun, but they shouldn't ruin other people's fun. Forget not that the GM is also a people whose fun can be ruined. Also explain to players that sometimes ...


7

Based on your description, she doesn't really enjoy the game. Yet, she keeps coming to the sessions. I can see two reasons for that: either she feels obligated to the party or her significant other, or she partakes in the game as a social event, not because of the game itself. Both happen. Regardless of what is causing the problem, you need to talk to the ...


6

If you're just starting out, I think it's best to start with the easiest measures of what's going on. What were the most fun parts of a session to you? Why? Did any parts stand out as having the other players really excited? Was there any points where you didn't know what to do, or the players seemed at a loss? Was there anything that was really ...


6

My answer was to this question that has been made a duplicate of this one. In the former, the bored/passive player was the girlfriend of a veteran player, and that's why you can read that assumption in my answer. As Tridus said, you must ask her. It's the best way to try to know what's happening. I have had similar situations in the past. When a veteran ...


6

... Clearly, your players will try to experiment with their new found powers. Can they first reproduce the effects they are "familiar" with? If so, they will probably start developing training regimes to increase both power and control over their respective abilities. This, in and of itself, is a good plot seed. Now, would this approach work? That ...


5

The following has worked quite well for me as a GM at game conventions where pre-generated characters are the norm. I have done this many times. Sit your players around the table with nothing on it. Place the character sheets face down in the middle of the table. State the following: "Each of you take a sheet, look it over privately. If you are ...


5

That you mention Concorde places this scenario in 1976 or later, probably before 2003 when Concorde was retired from service, though your scenario may vary from this. You mention a hijacking, and while some trains can be quite luxurious (e.g. the Orient Express), they are literally railroaded and are practically impossible to hijack. This leaves only ...


4

From my personal experience with the same problem... Being a gamemaster can be very rewarding. Plotting, creating a world full of life and death, and knowing where all of the bodies are buried. It can be intoxicating. But I've also found that it can be stifling. My cure for it was found quite by accident, when I started into narrative style gaming. ...


4

There must be some successful, humane way of introducing the players to a setting they have no clue about. It's all about making that kind of translation a smooth and gentle. Take it in two parts. 1) The players need a rundown. 1a) .. of the things which local everyday people know about the region 1b) .. of the things which local everyday people know ...


4

First, I will echo the comments left: Electronic Communication during the week if possible, and Keep it Interesting. That said, session length need not have a major effect on the quality of play. Each session can build right where the last left off, with perhaps a minute of recap. Questions and clarifications could ideally be done over email/instant messages ...


3

Inevitably the best solution in these situations is Talk It Out If you've been experience a common problem at your tables but haven't been actually asked the players what's up (as alluded to when you say "I'm guessing"), you're failing in one of the primary duties of the GM; which is to make sure everyone is having fun. Now, it might be that this player is ...


3

I am this kind of player. I know it all too well, and more than once my GMs have talked to me about it. In my case, I "grew up" with DnD power-gamers, the types of players who dedicate themselves to creating the most powerful character possible within the rules, often bending said rules all the way to the breaking point. As a result, that's how I know how ...


3

Reward Individual Goals at odds with each other There's a lot of games that do this well, and they do it by having characters with cross goals that get XP/hero points, etc. Now, the trick is that if you want the characters to mostly cooperate with a little bit of friction, you make sure they have enough goals in common with smaller stakes ones at cross ...


3

Starting a business, group, school or Order I sometimes present situations to the players where they might see a notice for a shop or building that's for sale...Or its inherited in some way. Maybe someone they meet is setting up a small mercenary school and needs people to teach the new recuits? - even these might have their own challenges. Where do you get ...


3

What everyone else has said: have people choose by consensus or roll dice for first pick, and suggest easier-to-play characters for newer players. I've always done the "whoever gets to the table first gets first choice in pre-gen characters" when I've had these (like conventions). It encourages people to be prompt. The other thing is to make sure you put the ...


3

Let the players decide among themselves, unless you have a history of them fighting and not getting along? Also, let more than one person choose the same pre-gen. They want two melee fighters or two socialites? Great! Let them! Also, I tend to split the pregens into two stacks - send one clockwise, send the other counterclockwise. Generally speaking, I ...


3

Use both, but I would suggest not using an individual villain as more a group of people (who may or may not be led by a villain - the players shouldn't know that for most of the campaign). The Villain The Villain, group or individual, is the main antagonist of the group and the encounter them more often than other obstacles. She plots against the group and ...


3

The essence of sandbox play is following where the players lead, and it sounds like you're already doing that. What adding randomness does is make the world feel more alive and larger than the thread that the PCs are pursuing/creating, allowing the players to make informed decisions about where they want to drive the game. You don't need to be constantly ...


3

Reading the comments, I understood that what you're looking for is a way to immerse them in the story and to give them a taste of what role-playing is really about. And maybe even to encourage them to play the characters. Here's how I do it, when I come to a group with completely new players. Hopefully, it will help you a little. Explain to them quickly and ...



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