Hot answers tagged

18

As your clarifications to the question suggest you realize, the problem is not Rule Zero; it's your group wanting to change the rules to make the game easier for them, and you not wanting to. That's certainly understandable, but try looking at it this way: Your players are telling you something important about the kind of game they want to play. ...


17

Disclaimer: Some games lack Rule Zero, explicitly or implicitly. These games are generally designed to have a tighter focus, have explicitly defined creative roles for players, explicit rules for Game Masters (if the game has GM's at all), and they tend to spread the GM "power" around to all participants to a degree. I'm not going be talking about those ...


16

One way for religion to matter, as you suggest, is for it to cause adventures. At a surface level, this is no more difficult that getting any other factor to cause adventures-- Give that factor power and the authority to hand out quests or obligations, and go from there. Even the narrow history and literature of western Europe presents several broad ideas: ...


15

To preamble this answer with some experience, I've been a fan of the Witcher Saga for over a decade, played and run RPGs in that setting and I don't have to mention video games. The official RPGs suggested (back in the old days) one witcher per group, but there are ways to distinguish between a couple. Geralt was great at everything, being the legendary ...


10

Religion can lead to a lot of adventures in real life. (The Crusades come to mind...) The key, I would say, is that you think about the values and culture beyond just the trappings. Is the religion evangelical, with mission trips abroad? Large, with important conferences and councils? Are members dedicated to local service in the community? Are they ...


4

You are talking complete nonsense. (Hey, you asked...) Board games are one thing, where you are trying to simulate a very narrow range of actions. In RPGs, you are trying to simulate an entire world with active players in it. No RPG has rules that are complete or without conflict and very few try. Really only the more minimalistic storygames that switch ...


3

Churches have hierarchies and structures like kingdoms, and even among true believers in the same gods, there can be power struggles, factions, disagreements. You could have the order become divided. You could have a corrupt person become the leader of the organization (especially if the God isn't an interventionist God or hasn't been seen for a while). ...


3

What would be most practical way for me to negotiate a ban on rule changes with my group? We have not played any RPG before. I could be talking a complete nonsense above, that why I'm asking for your help. Well, you mention that in non-cooperative games, it's easier to ban rule changes because it could unbalance the game. The same can be said for ...


3

In my group, we are usually pressed for time, so I always sit down with my players, put on my cheesiest radio show narrator voice and start with, "when we last left our heroes..." and do a quick 15 to 30 second recap of what happened last week followed by either the results of the last action they had done, such as them sending a thief to steal a magical ...


2

Most RPG games will involve the DM making a lot of rulings. "Is the orc close enough for me to swing my sword at him, if I move toward him first?" "Are silver arrows available for sale in this village?" "How easy is it to climb this tree?" Unless you spend your whole adventure having grid-based combats, you will be making these sorts of decisions every ...


2

I once played an IRC game featuring one channel for each of in character and out of character chat. To simulate multiple languages, we just used more channels, one for each. Any character who knew a language would join the side channel. This helped RP because players literally couldn't understand languages they didn't know. Unfortunately, they also didn't ...


1

First, don't assume the players are ever going to do things the way you expect them to. You've taken away your options. Now, you have a few options. If you need them all to meet up at a certain place, either start the adventure at that place or, if this is mid-game, place the spot right in their tracks so they won't miss it. Place it inside a narrative. ...


1

You could use flags. For example, see this dialogue: I speak English. No need for the text to be in a different color. Mo, you speak a derivative of English called American. And it's spelled colour! Err, what are you on about? It's pronounce "couleur"! Clearly, using some smaller flags would be better but I could not find tiny ones. Most ...


1

Does this exact group of individuals ever get together socially outside of game night? You indicated that it's a fairly fresh group and the campaign hasn't been going on that long, so I suspect that there's a need for the (non-campaign-related) socialization that you're seeing. I'm going to expand on that element of Sardathrion's answer and suggest that you ...



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