Hot answers tagged

58

My vote is for the broad-strokes banhammer. In short, don't make a big deal of it and people mostly won't notice. Just because something exists in the world does not mean it should be an option for the players. Why not let one of them play as a Mage or Werewolf? Because it doesn't work in the world the GM has defined. Why not Malkavians? Because they're ...


14

Particularly in a game where there are lots of possible character creation options, or where the chance of someone picking the undesired option is low. You can tell people to bounce their character off you first, and leave it at that. Try to have this discussion before the first session with each person individually to reduce the info available to the group....


9

I have the following suggestions, after having been in one VERY successful game of this type for many years, and having generally tried to emulate that success (in varying results) since: If your campaign depends on discovery, have a lot to discover, and have many paths to discovery. Don't inadvertently design a setting where the players only have one or ...


7

Instead of giving them a blacklist of character options they must not take, give them a whitelist of character options they are allowed to take. You might also consider to throw in some options from official or unofficial supplemental material to make the list longer. That way any options which are absent from the list do not look as obvious. It also forces ...


5

What I do is, when someone shows interest in one of my predetermined plot hooks, I take an index card and I write: "Quest: 500xp" and a description of the plot hook. I give them the index card; if they complete the quest, they get the experience award. The purpose of the experience is not so much to bribe them to investigate the thing, as to let them know ...


5

You're trying to achieve quite opposite goals there, so you have come to one of the basic questions that leads to the three corners of designing crafting systems: Realism (in the context of crafting & economy, this means a high degree of complexity & depth) Usability (often this comes down to easy-to-use and not so much depth) Consistency (whether ...


5

Be upfront about it. In this game, PC must not come from the Malkavian clan. This is a pre-condition of the game, just as "being a vampire",and using X system. All my games have a list of those with a few must and a few may. This sets up players to build character that fit within the main plot line I want to run as part of this game. After all, the ...


4

Talk to the group. With issues involving group dynamics; people not listening, doing their own thing, disregarding others etc., this is usually best handled by discussing the issue with the group. You mentioned you tried the "talking stick" - which is a good idea; but you have to enforce it. Some ways to do this might be: Get a physical object to hold. ...


4

1. Is it plausible that a character in a medieval setting, knowing nothing about modern-day science, will start building something like that? -Not categorically, no. But the science of using barrels to stabilize and aim shots is already established. To my knowledge, there are a couple of examples that use this principle. On page 42 of AA ("Aventurisches ...


3

My players aren't the sort to go haring after everything that looks a tiny bit out of place anyway, and they tend to have a hard time remembering even the things that did pique their curiosity from one session to the next. I feel like this might be the core of your problem, here. You need to check in with your players and get some feedback. "So I've been ...


2

What you describe is like the style I have generally preferred for decades, running games where I've invented most or all of the campaign world details myself (as opposed to running a published campaign world). What I do, which seems to work well for my own tastes, is start with giving no help/clues to mysteries at all, with clues to mysteries only showing ...


2

I always try to keep in mind that the players have no idea what I'm planning for them as a GM. If the plan WAS to have them encounter a villain from Clan X, but one of the players unintentionally ruins this by deciding to be from Clan X? Well, I just change the story a bit: Now, the Villain is from clan Y. I've never played the Masquerade, so perhaps the ...


1

I basically agree with other answers, I will suggest other approaches: Stop playing pathfinder Most of your problems (2 and 3) seems to come from the complexity of the rules, either because the DM don't know them well enough to keep the pace interesting or because players always have things to check. Pathfinder's rules are among the most complex ones I ...


1

There are some forum discussions on various sites on the Internet, such as this one, but notice that it is a similar topic but the original asker there is asking "how many fights per session can you comfortably fit in". If you really mean to focus on the game-time to real-time ratio, that may be harder to find, since that can range from 1-second-per-turn (...


1

The "Do Stuff" approach is probably your best option. But build on it in the direction that you want... First, decide to play your character like it is all in your head and then let him decide if it is or not. Don't even tell your DM that you have decided this, just go with it. That way if he is never going to stick to his campaign, it doesn't matter. It ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible