Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

That's a matter of personal taste and your group dynamics. We usually make a slow immersion. If I am the GM, after a reasonable social time, I start distributing character sheets (it's a good signal, and generally forces players to think about their characters), and asking questions: "Do you remember what happened last session?" or "Your character didn't ...


1

Use Music. I have been running with a group of people and what we found helps bring out the story and get everyone into the mood, is to play related music in the background. Don't get me wrong, there is no such thing as a perfect gaming group that does not get distracted, and you may have to say "Okay guys we're starting now" but atleast this way your 'magic ...


0

GM Struggles and Laments I run an open world and the players are not even bound to stay on the world. I do not tailor ever session for every lonewolf character. First I require every player have at least 3 characters and the characters are individuals, not default groupies. Sure I have a wide variety of potential quests and adventures that the characters ...


0

While it might be overkill, have you tried troupe play? Essentially, if you have an organization (an adventuring clan, a small church, a warrior's guild, the order of the stick, what have you) that the players are a part of, give each player three characters at the start of the game, with the rule that they have to be built for different roles and an ...


-1

Why not tailor some challenges to make it beneficial to have a rogue, but possible without. "You kick down the door of the throne room and the guards raise their weapons, advancing towards you behind raised shields. The captain of the guard cries out "Reinforcements, we are under attack!". The King dives behind the throne, a towering monstrosity of gold ...


-4

Play a classless RPG One solution it to do away with classes altogether. There are many systems that do this, the only one I have a lot of experience with is GURPS. It operates on a point-buy system. The GM gives you a number of points (usually 100) and you buy whatever you want, with few restrictions. The advantage is, you get exactly the character you ...


0

Actually - this would be how I replaced the character with a Master Spy. Along with an accomplice - magic-user of some sort to cast 'charm person' or similar magic on the one to be replaced. Use notecards to send to the player to let them know they don't want to go towards that closet. Try to keep the party from opening the closet. Then, when the closet ...


1

One thing that hasn't been covered is the possibility of the master spy being able to enter and live in the mind of a player. This way, the player is still the same but his/her actions can be influenced or even initiated by the mind controller. Hand out notes that influence the behavior of the character and let things unfold from there. The plus side of ...


1

A good question has an answer that can be used in many different ways. The expected answer should be of such a nature that it can be used as the starting point of further questions. I have three questions I think work wonders for this: Name three things you would like to do before you die. Coming up with a life goal is hard and strange. What is your life ...


1

How I would do it. This spy, s/he has something she wants. Some information to get, some place to get the players in, some reasons to behave is some specific way that might tip the other characters and players. Now, if this is asking them something the character the spy camouflages at, it's tricky. There's no way I can see telling that player to ask the ...


2

I've done this! It's super fun! You really need player buy-in for best results, and it helps to know and trust your group. But I've done it two different ways. The first might work best for a "surprise everyone" Everyone Gets A Note This is useful for many situations besides this specific question. Pass a note to each player. All but one of the notes will ...


1

I suggest a rather different tack. Instead of cluing the player in on the fact that he has been replaced, keep that information a surprise until the very end. A master spy would, of course, know everything about the person he is going to impersonate. As such, the player himself will convincingly play his own character without ever needing prompting. The ...


1

Have the player use that character only in scenarios that work for it. In the case of the thief/rogue, keep him for city play and have the player roll up something else for dungeon stuff; perhaps make the thief the henchman of the new character so that the player can take them both on the adventure, but you can focus spotlight time on the one that's most ...


2

For starters I would like to say that I've been in the Rogue situation, and it was actually a little more frustrating. The Fighter would just bust down doors and take enemies head on knowing he had a health battery in the party druid, but I digress. Not Really for Players A lot of the most problematic classes aren't really designed for the players, unless ...


11

You've run into a common problem - "Party RPGs with non-Party Characters". Same Page Tool can't fix groups who want different things, and it also can't fix game design that works against it's own game premise. You have a few options: Class Limiting "Hey, we're playing X kind of game and these classes/types in this game don't fit that. Can we just ...


0

I've had to teach a LOT of non-roleplayers, how to play. One shot 1-2 hour game - figure on 3-5 scenes and a situation that fits that. Action, or drama, anything with a VERY CLEAR set of goals. Not an investigation Most complex mechanical conflict resolves with no more than 3-4 dice rolls/turns/rounds Either pregens, or character building that involves ...


1

Some of the techniques you will use will be the same as in my other answer about transitioning long-time roll-players to roleplaying, but in this case you have the benefit of working with new players without a lot of preconceptions built up. The biggest thing you can do is to make sure you are, explicitly and implicitly, encouraging in-character roleplay in ...


0

You've got this marked as system agnostic. May I suggest you choose the RPG you will be playing with some care? Ask your players what genre of story they are interested in, and look for a rules light game in that genre. We have lots of game recommendation questions here. It might be worth asking what they're looking for (Sci-fi adventure, like Star Wars? ...


0

Short answer: Make them all evil. Longer story: My playing group is taking a break from the main storyline, and I decided to introduce my players to Pathfinder - as several of them are brand new to roleplaying, and have not even played any D&D based system before. But because of the particular sense of humor of my group, I decided not to do a ...


0

I agree with Longspeak's answer, that you should let their playstyle naturally emerge. However, I come at it from a different angle that I think warrants a separate answer. Or maybe not, since it doesn't really make sense outside the context of all the other answers, but I think it's worth saying so here I go. Playstyle isn't just about preferred balance of ...


3

Reading the comments, I understood that what you're looking for is a way to immerse them in the story and to give them a taste of what role-playing is really about. And maybe even to encourage them to play the characters. Here's how I do it, when I come to a group with completely new players. Hopefully, it will help you a little. Explain to them quickly and ...


1

PipperChip's answer is solid. One thing to add... We know there are different types of player, who play for different reasons and get different things from the experience. Even though they have never role-played before, your friends will emerge as one of the types. Let them. Take care not to make too many assumptions about what styles and preferences may ...


8

I'm assuming your players already understand the basic concept of roleplaying. The Ground Rules of Roleplaying Tell your players that roleplaying is supposed to be fun. They should do what they think is fun, but they shouldn't ruin other people's fun. Forget not that the GM is also a people whose fun can be ruined. Also explain to players that sometimes ...


16

From Experience I wish I could point you to a guide, but alas, I must rely on my own experience introducing people to role playing. There are a few things to help people get into the swing of things: Directly address the social contract, and how the game is going to work. This is really basic. I usually address this by saying something like: "We're going ...


1

It sounds to me like there are two issues here. The tone of the setting, and the desire to play the main protagonist. Setting Firstly, it sounds like your preference is for a game of gritty realism and low fantasy, and his preference is for playing heroic high fantasy of mythic proportions. To address the issue of setting, you need to negotiate with your ...


1

If you can't beat em' join em'? Run games like SLA or X-Crawl that encourage players to be the biggest badass in town and become rich and famous doing it: Do some high profile BPNs, appear on the news covered in blood, gain a Karma sponsorship and then knock off and go for a drink in The Pit. of course, if you get to famous you might wake up with Haloween ...


3

The essence of sandbox play is following where the players lead, and it sounds like you're already doing that. What adding randomness does is make the world feel more alive and larger than the thread that the PCs are pursuing/creating, allowing the players to make informed decisions about where they want to drive the game. You don't need to be constantly ...


4

First, I will echo the comments left: Electronic Communication during the week if possible, and Keep it Interesting. That said, session length need not have a major effect on the quality of play. Each session can build right where the last left off, with perhaps a minute of recap. Questions and clarifications could ideally be done over email/instant messages ...


9

To the extent its not disrupting things, let him be cool People come to role playing for different reasons and enjoy different things about it. If he wants to be "cool", and it is not disruptive, I would let him. It seems to be something he enjoys, so let him have fun with it. Dealing with disruption The problem comes with the fact that his actions ...


21

As I see it you have 2 main issues: Spotlight Hogging and disconnect on world/tone Share the spotlight Emphasize to the player (and the rest of the table) that everyone will get their time in the spotlight, but that they should act in a supporting role when its not their turn. Its totally fine for the PC/Player to want to have moments worth of song (or ...


0

For a one-off, you want to make choosing a character fast and painless. If it doesn't matter to the game which (or how many) archetypes are used, print out plenty of extras, and let each player pick the top sheet from the pile of whichever archetype he/she wants. Alternately, shuffle all the sheets together and have each player pick two, look at them, then ...


1

You can use descriptive precedents rather than numbers Reward the players with improved powers according to how and how much effort their characters put into understanding their powers, train in using them, research their underlying rules on their own or track down and seek aid from more experienced mentors. And, of course, on actually using them. If you ...


0

I will answer assuming that you already have some kind of system to measure both power and control. I will also assume that the way you explain magic for your universe allow some growth in both power and control (what would be the point of the question if this was not the case...) Roleplay They discovered these abilities by themselves, they should decide ...


6

... Clearly, your players will try to experiment with their new found powers. Can they first reproduce the effects they are "familiar" with? If so, they will probably start developing training regimes to increase both power and control over their respective abilities. This, in and of itself, is a good plot seed. Now, would this approach work? That ...


0

Make it Real If you want your players to be traumatized, then you need to make them think their characters could die. Stage a fight between 2 champions and have your player character lose. He can be raised by your cleric, but the fact that he can lose, suddenly makes the game much more real. Paralyze the Paladin If you don't want to kill them, handicap ...


0

First, start by giving your players the opportunity to interact with the hopefully rich word around them. If they want to found a college, build constructs, make armor, talk to nobility, or just drink in a bar, give them that opportunity. Have them role play it. Have them buy from the bartender, give them interesting characters to interact with and gossip ...


-3

Alhoons A mind flayer.. but with tons of Sorcerer or Wizard levels and a ton of extra lich included. An Alhoon has the capability of mind flaying hundreds of people in any given location into drooling dominance, has potent spellcasting ability, and has the potent visage of an undead mind flayer.


3

Reward Individual Goals at odds with each other There's a lot of games that do this well, and they do it by having characters with cross goals that get XP/hero points, etc. Now, the trick is that if you want the characters to mostly cooperate with a little bit of friction, you make sure they have enough goals in common with smaller stakes ones at cross ...


0

How much? As many other people have noted, it really depends on your group and the game you're playing. Some people enjoy games that are railroaded - they're playing to get a story told to them, and maybe make a few choices in a fight scene. Some people want to be able to do anything that's appropriate within the game genre/setting, and do not want a ...


1

There are so many different possible solutions here. As others have said, asking may be the easiest way to pinpoint the actual problem. Some potential problems: Problem 1) Too slow paced - 5 players is a pretty sizable party, which may drag the combat on too long. You haven't said what level you're playing, what books you're using or what classes people ...


6

My answer was to this question that has been made a duplicate of this one. In the former, the bored/passive player was the girlfriend of a veteran player, and that's why you can read that assumption in my answer. As Tridus said, you must ask her. It's the best way to try to know what's happening. I have had similar situations in the past. When a veteran ...


7

Based on your description, she doesn't really enjoy the game. Yet, she keeps coming to the sessions. I can see two reasons for that: either she feels obligated to the party or her significant other, or she partakes in the game as a social event, not because of the game itself. Both happen. Regardless of what is causing the problem, you need to talk to the ...


13

Ask Her There are a lot of possible causes for why she could be bored. Maybe it turns out she doesn't like roleplaying, or doesn't like the system, or is lost in what is a fairly complicated ruleset and tunes out. That last one is important. 3.5 is a complex game. Newbies can easily get overwhelmed, especially when surrounded by veteran players who know ...


0

Im going to take a different approach to answering this question. The following information helps both the Players and the GM. My answer draws alot of influence from the murder mystery genre but will help to other kind of investigation plots. Suggest good sources of influence for the GM. There are a number of TV series, Films, and Novels that can help. In ...


2

A treant or awakened tree In Eberron, there is a leader of a nature-based faction who is either a treant or an awakened great pine, named Oalian. Taking him (it?) as a working example of how such a creature could lead a faction, it seems a good fit for your criteria: it's not a standard biped, it lives and breathes, highly intelligent and open for social ...


1

Combine the best out of both worlds! Make the world a static hurdle with a fixed strength, while their enemy can be an ever changing foe. For example: The groups goal is a magic artifact in a hidden jungle cave. They have to get a map with the location, where they fight against the henchmen of the arch enemy. When they have the map they need to cross the ...


3

Use both, but I would suggest not using an individual villain as more a group of people (who may or may not be led by a villain - the players shouldn't know that for most of the campaign). The Villain The Villain, group or individual, is the main antagonist of the group and the encounter them more often than other obstacles. She plots against the group and ...


-2

I would like to suggest just turn it up a notch. How about on top of the rival you have in place start adding a defending organization.


2

I don't know your group, so I can't say whether an archenemy or a variety of environmental stuff will work better. But what I can give you, is a couple of tricks to make an archenemy more interesting. Subordinate Triad If I have an NPC that is going to be an ongoing problem, I like to set up a "Subordinate Triad". You know how Captain Kirk had Spock and ...


5

That you mention Concorde places this scenario in 1976 or later, probably before 2003 when Concorde was retired from service, though your scenario may vary from this. You mention a hijacking, and while some trains can be quite luxurious (e.g. the Orient Express), they are literally railroaded and are practically impossible to hijack. This leaves only ...



Top 50 recent answers are included