New answers tagged

1

I have the following suggestions, after having been in one VERY successful game of this type for many years, and having generally tried to emulate that success (in varying results) since: If your campaign depends on discovery, have a lot to discover, and have many paths to discovery. Don't inadvertently design a setting where the players only have one or ...


1

My players aren't the sort to go haring after everything that looks a tiny bit out of place anyway, and they tend to have a hard time remembering even the things that did pique their curiosity from one session to the next. I feel like this might be the core of your problem, here. You need to check in with your players and get some feedback. "So I've been ...


2

What I do is, when someone shows interest in one of my predetermined plot hooks, I take an index card and I write: "Quest: 500xp" and a description of the plot hook. I give them the index card; if they complete the quest, they get the experience award. The purpose of the experience is not so much to bribe them to investigate the thing, as to let them know ...


1

What you describe is like the style I have generally preferred for decades, running games where I've invented most or all of the campaign world details myself (as opposed to running a published campaign world). What I do, which seems to work well for my own tastes, is start with giving no help/clues to mysteries at all, with clues to mysteries only showing ...


4

I'm going to present somehwat of a frame challenge here: you might want to eliminate that initial seed of doubt about the player from your own mind. It sounds like you're already off to a worse start than you could have by simply removing your expectations of the player entirely and letting the situation unfold naturally. Simply put: he isn't a problem ...


3

For players who might not show up, or might "not be all there" during play, or who otherwise might fail to play or fail to roleplay or drop out or get kicked out, the GM can/should think in advance about what to do in those cases. Some options I have used which worked well for me include: Have the PC's character be somewhat aligned with the player's. If ...


7

Talk with your group. Very often, I find that intragroup conflicts come from expectation mismatches. If your player expects to play a free-association storytelling game, or to just hang out and occasionally improv or "hit it with my axe!", his narcoleptic wizard and altered consciousness are appropriate and good. If you expect Tolkein-style storytelling ...


1

Use mnemo-techniques like method of loci. This should be fairly easy - because you have to imagine the place where you and your players (virtually) go anyways. Make yourself comfortable with the location you are going to visit. Think in strong absurd pictures. If there are creatures lurking imagine them with unusal colors: a pink goblin, a yellow ork, a ...


0

As a corollary to some of the other answers here, note that your players might just be on your side. GM: "You see a thief running towards the marketplace, and-" Players: "Oh, good! We should chase him! That'll give us a good excuse to meet up with everyone else!" If you all want the same thing - and in this case, you probably do - there's no need to "get"...


4

As a player, you can talk before the game to your DM and mention your desires and concerns so he knows where you're coming from. You may also learn how he intends to approach things, and you can ask him if there are ways you can help support him in keeping things running smoothly, etc. As a DM, there are endless ways to affect the atmosphere of a group, and ...


8

Before the game Make sure you are all on the same page before that game start. Explain that you want to play a serious game with lots of immersion. State that you are both willing to help others with immersion and lead by example. This is best done before the game starts. If not all players agree, then you might want to rethink join said game. As a side ...


10

You are all out for a good time. My idea of a good time often involves watching rugby league; my idea of a bad time involves watching motorsport. How can that be? Aren't they both sports? Sometimes, in order to spend quality time together with friends, I watch motorsports. And they, being good friends, might watch rugby league even if it is not their ...


0

One has to be very careful here, while much of the above is true, let me tell you a little tale. In a game I played in years ago our party was escaping a camp where some weird and deadly things were happening. One player was well ahead of the group and came to a road in the wilderness with chasm just beyond, he could go left, right, or turn back. The GM did ...


2

Most of the other answers have focused on the right answer to talk to the other players like adults. All good. But what happens in game? Make the mistake part of the story you are telling. Find an explanation why said power was (is) more powerful for that one character. Is it a blessing from the gods? A curse from some demon? Something even more nefarious? ...


19

What you don't do Don't bring this up in the middle of a dangerous battle, when the player tries to use the power at a crucial juncture. (Then the GM rules it illegal, some PC bites the dust, and it's all your fault.) Who do you talk to first? It's all got to do with personalities I don't really think there's a correct answer, in the general sense, ...


4

The best way to deal with this is the first time it happens to just say to everyone: "X doesn't work like that", however, that ship has sailed. As the next best option, at the start of the next session say "You know how awesome that X was last session, well I looked it up and, turns out, RAW it's not as awesome as we thought. It can only do Y, going forward,...


8

This isn't something which every player is prepared to do, but, if you have any game mastering experience or aptitude at all, you could do something which I have done as a player for basically the same reason. (Almost. In my case, the reason wasn't to demonstrate why allowing a bad rule interpretation to persist would be game-breaking and un-fun. In my case,...


21

I think the easy and short answer here is to "Talk to the GM and go over the details of the rule in question with them and then let them handle it." You said you were between sessions, so now would be a good time to bring it up with the GM. Mention you have noticed something that you didnt think was correct according to the RAW so you did some reasearch, ...


0

I use the new version of epic generator.


1

As asked, yes, you are taking away some player agency. If the player doesn't balk and says "oh, ok," then it's no-harm, no-foul. It might be better to ask the player some questions instead though. Assuming the player isn't just being difficult it might go something like this: "Druids are famous for never wearing metal armor. Why does Swift Bird the Druid ...


2

In all honesty it sounds like your GM is a bit in over his head. There are 2 things that you should do there. As stated already by Z.MOE you can help him by formulating out your actions with details imposed there and try to get him to react. Although as it sounds it could very probably be that your GM is not experienced enough for that approach. In this ...


8

DO stuff... sounds strange right? But, actually it's the fastest way to immersion. When he says "you enter the inn," you make a whole bunch of assumptions about the inn right away: "I saunter up to the bar, slap down a gold piece and leer at the most attractive barmaid." You just fleshed out his inn. Maybe the next player says, "Not me, I pull a chair up ...


0

It's entirely acceptable for the GM to tell a player, "Your character wouldn't do that" and give reasons for why you think that the character wouldn't do whatever action. As long as the player is still allowed to take whatever action they want (within the mechanical limits of the game of course) after they hear the reason why they probably wouldn't do it, no ...


3

A group of 8-9 players is HUGE. You can run three games with that many people. Consider splitting the group Splitting may be controversial and there are people who would tell you it's more work. It is in fact less work when you have to prepare for a smaller group, but it would be a good idea to find another GM. You group sounds perfect for a standard 2x(GM+...


5

I call this "Open World" versus "Story Arc." Obviously both styles are fine but I've seen this problem as well. The sides get a little tired of each other. If you want to bring your wanderers into the story I suggest you tie some plot points to their characters' history. Or rather, add their history to the plot points. Examples are to add in mid-crawl ...


4

I have had more than one group like this, some like the overall "GRAND STORY" while others like the individual choice/freedom aspect. With a group that large: You could split up the group, though that would mean more work on your side as a GM/DM. Continue doing what you are doing. The best solution I have found is exactly what you are doing, a little ...



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