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1

There are some forum discussions on various sites on the Internet, such as this one, but notice that it is a similar topic but the original asker there is asking "how many fights per session can you comfortably fit in". If you really mean to focus on the game-time to real-time ratio, that may be harder to find, since that can range from 1-second-per-turn (...


5

You're trying to achieve quite opposite goals there, so you have come to one of the basic questions that leads to the three corners of designing crafting systems: Realism (in the context of crafting & economy, this means a high degree of complexity & depth) Usability (often this comes down to easy-to-use and not so much depth) Consistency (whether ...


0

You seriously think that a medieval character wouldn't think of filling a clay flask with lamp oil, putting a rag wick also soaked in oil into the flask, lighting it, and throwing it? That's all a molotov is - and just takes some basic common sense. In this specific case the PCs understanding of what they can do is IMO more realistic than yours. So how do ...


0

A MacGuffin is a nearly perfect trope to do just what you want. As all tropes, it has it place and work amazingly well if done correctly or it can feel derivative and misplaced. For example, the players find a bunch of coins with a specific sigil which are worthless in $current_local. A little later, they find a pendent with said sigil. No one seems to know ...


1

The "Do Stuff" approach is probably your best option. But build on it in the direction that you want... First, decide to play your character like it is all in your head and then let him decide if it is or not. Don't even tell your DM that you have decided this, just go with it. That way if he is never going to stick to his campaign, it doesn't matter. It ...


9

I have the following suggestions, after having been in one VERY successful game of this type for many years, and having generally tried to emulate that success (in varying results) since: If your campaign depends on discovery, have a lot to discover, and have many paths to discovery. Don't inadvertently design a setting where the players only have one or ...


3

My players aren't the sort to go haring after everything that looks a tiny bit out of place anyway, and they tend to have a hard time remembering even the things that did pique their curiosity from one session to the next. I feel like this might be the core of your problem, here. You need to check in with your players and get some feedback. "So I've been ...


5

What I do is, when someone shows interest in one of my predetermined plot hooks, I take an index card and I write: "Quest: 500xp" and a description of the plot hook. I give them the index card; if they complete the quest, they get the experience award. The purpose of the experience is not so much to bribe them to investigate the thing, as to let them know ...


2

What you describe is like the style I have generally preferred for decades, running games where I've invented most or all of the campaign world details myself (as opposed to running a published campaign world). What I do, which seems to work well for my own tastes, is start with giving no help/clues to mysteries at all, with clues to mysteries only showing ...


4

I'm going to present somehwat of a frame challenge here: you might want to eliminate that initial seed of doubt about the player from your own mind. It sounds like you're already off to a worse start than you could have by simply removing your expectations of the player entirely and letting the situation unfold naturally. Simply put: he isn't a problem ...


3

For players who might not show up, or might "not be all there" during play, or who otherwise might fail to play or fail to roleplay or drop out or get kicked out, the GM can/should think in advance about what to do in those cases. Some options I have used which worked well for me include: Have the PC's character be somewhat aligned with the player's. If ...


7

Talk with your group. Very often, I find that intragroup conflicts come from expectation mismatches. If your player expects to play a free-association storytelling game, or to just hang out and occasionally improv or "hit it with my axe!", his narcoleptic wizard and altered consciousness are appropriate and good. If you expect Tolkein-style storytelling ...



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