New answers tagged

0

To make this involving across the group and to make the importance of religion clear, keep nudging your players back to those themes. When one of them make a decision just ask "how would your god feel about this?" "Are you following one of The Precepts now?" and use that to explore how the characters interact with religion. If it is a religious society then ...


-1

There are a lot of good answers here, but there are some things that haven't been mentioned. Religion plays a big part in the life of those who are a part of it, if not controls most of the actions of one's life. In most religions, you are going to have some sort of prayer, and dedicate time to that prayer. Some religions only pray on certain days ...


3

Churches have hierarchies and structures like kingdoms, and even among true believers in the same gods, there can be power struggles, factions, disagreements. You could have the order become divided. You could have a corrupt person become the leader of the organization (especially if the God isn't an interventionist God or hasn't been seen for a while). ...


15

One way for religion to matter, as you suggest, is for it to cause adventures. At a surface level, this is no more difficult that getting any other factor to cause adventures-- Give that factor power and the authority to hand out quests or obligations, and go from there. Even the narrow history and literature of western Europe presents several broad ideas: ...


10

Religion can lead to a lot of adventures in real life. (The Crusades come to mind...) The key, I would say, is that you think about the values and culture beyond just the trappings. Is the religion evangelical, with mission trips abroad? Large, with important conferences and councils? Are members dedicated to local service in the community? Are they ...


1

Does this exact group of individuals ever get together socially outside of game night? You indicated that it's a fairly fresh group and the campaign hasn't been going on that long, so I suspect that there's a need for the (non-campaign-related) socialization that you're seeing. I'm going to expand on that element of Sardathrion's answer and suggest that you ...


3

In my group, we are usually pressed for time, so I always sit down with my players, put on my cheesiest radio show narrator voice and start with, "when we last left our heroes..." and do a quick 15 to 30 second recap of what happened last week followed by either the results of the last action they had done, such as them sending a thief to steal a magical ...


3

What would be most practical way for me to negotiate a ban on rule changes with my group? We have not played any RPG before. I could be talking a complete nonsense above, that why I'm asking for your help. Well, you mention that in non-cooperative games, it's easier to ban rule changes because it could unbalance the game. The same can be said for ...


4

You are talking complete nonsense. (Hey, you asked...) Board games are one thing, where you are trying to simulate a very narrow range of actions. In RPGs, you are trying to simulate an entire world with active players in it. No RPG has rules that are complete or without conflict and very few try. Really only the more minimalistic storygames that switch ...


18

As your clarifications to the question suggest you realize, the problem is not Rule Zero; it's your group wanting to change the rules to make the game easier for them, and you not wanting to. That's certainly understandable, but try looking at it this way: Your players are telling you something important about the kind of game they want to play. ...


2

Most RPG games will involve the DM making a lot of rulings. "Is the orc close enough for me to swing my sword at him, if I move toward him first?" "Are silver arrows available for sale in this village?" "How easy is it to climb this tree?" Unless you spend your whole adventure having grid-based combats, you will be making these sorts of decisions every ...


17

Disclaimer: Some games lack Rule Zero, explicitly or implicitly. These games are generally designed to have a tighter focus, have explicitly defined creative roles for players, explicit rules for Game Masters (if the game has GM's at all), and they tend to spread the GM "power" around to all participants to a degree. I'm not going be talking about those ...



Top 50 recent answers are included