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2

In A One Shot If the game is a one-off (or totally episodic), then ending right after killing the big bad isn't all that bad a plan. There are other options, however. You can have them face a few more villains, or even have to get back to town. Which I would do depends highly upon time left. If I have an hour or two left in the schedule, it's definitely ...


1

It depends if it's a "one-shot" or part of a longer campaign, and whether you've finished the adventure, or run out of time first. If it's part of a longer campaign, and you've finished the adventure, I'd usually end it after the party get back to town. They can divide their loot, sell off unwanted items, go shopping for that magical item they've been ...


-3

Ugh. This is the problem with so-called 'player agency'. Most players are not going to spend time to buy bread or prepare a marching order, or anything else they should have worked out previously(including having a goal), until you reach a point like your example. Sooo, you have to lead them through the steps. If you require the players to buy supplies, ...


9

Managing the end of the game I'm very visual so I tend to think in terms of movies or tv shows. So if it's not a continuing game where cliffhangers make sense, then I wrap it up and maybe ask a few questions to give the players some input. "You come home and the elders greet you and feast you! You're the heroes and a celebration is held..." "Did ...


5

Choose your Moment A session should usually end at the end of a scene (unless you're doing a cliffhanger ending). Let the final scene reach its natural conclusion then tell your players "That's all for tonight. Thank you for playing." You don't need to use those exact words, but the idea is to have a firm statement that the action is over, and a positive ...


4

Ending the Game In general, I don't end a session immediately after a boss fight (or any fight, really) unless I'm pressed for time. Typically I allow (it's more of an unspoken requirement really) my players to return to town/home base/wilderness camp/whatever-the-next-goal-in-the-game-is and I attempt to foster a small social encounter between the PCs. ...


-3

Generally, I would end the campaign with a conversation with the person who commissioned the campaign in the first place. It could be as simple as "Well, you slew the dragon that has been terrorizing us, so we like to have a party in your favor." And the party rides off into the sunset. This is a good time for the party to discuss what the different PCs ...


6

I'll assume that you and your players are on the same page, that they're convinced that this is a fun and interesting approach to playing, and that the sticking point is that even though they're committed to trying things your way, they keep falling back into old habits. In my experience, the best way to change these habits is to change the social ...


2

I usually try to avoid long dialogs between one PC and an NPC, because I worry that the other players will be bored by spending a long time "out of the spotlight". When someone starts flirting with an NPC (and makes a good Diplomacy check), my preferred answer tends to be: "Yeah, you two are getting along great! ...Okay, so those two step away from the ...


7

The best things to do (in "best" order) given your assumptions and question would be: Sit them down individually and play through a mini-session or two with them. Translate what they want into what fits the game Break it to them that perhaps this isn't the game for them and maybe see about finding one that is. Now, on to explanations! I will be using ...


1

Preface You request advice on getting people to behave within the rules of a game. One way to get them to see things your way is to use first principles, which for games is: "A game is defined by its rules." 1. Use Analogies A. Offer the example of common games like checkers, chess or tennis. They all have reasonably concise and well known rules. ...


1

I am currently doing this as the "player who moved away" playing in a weekly game with friends who still meet up at the old venue. The good news is that is it very workable. However, the limitations I have faced are not visual, but sound-based. And that's even though we play with exploration and combat on a shared map (D&D 5E currently). Invest in a ...


2

While I have not done a mixed online/face to face game, I HAVE done both all online, all face to face games, AND done business meetings with most people in person and 1-2 people remote. So I'll combine what I know from that and give you some general advice: Video Logistics Find something that works for everyone who is going to be remote and is easy and ...


2

I was in a group with one remote player for a little over two years, and have also taken part in multiple long-term online-only campaigns using various tabletops. I don't really disagree with anything Dorian said, but I'm posting this to elaborate on how we did it, and explain my experience with the tools we used. Please note up front -- if you are playing ...


2

We've played a game with a single member abroad a few months ago, and it was, well, workable. A webcam set to view the entire group This one allows the distant user to see the other people at the table, which is critical for the social aspect. (Even if you're using an online tool, consider using cameras to support it. I've played without and it costs a ...


1

While there are likely many solutions to this, many of which might even be a mix of the two below, I feel these two are the most straightforward ways of addressing this without some sort of specialized setup. At least until we get Virtual Reality up to Sci-Fi levels lol. Webcams are your friend. One of the first solutions to come to mind would be the ...


14

Separation of Player and Character The biggest thing is to remember that just like the Players are not their Characters, you are not the NPCs. Keeping this straight helps eliminate many issues, but it sounds like you have a good feel for this, so lets look a bit deeper. Give the Interaction Purpose Idly chatting and flirting can be a struggle for some ...


3

I've run across this problem a number of time while playing as part of a group in an open ended game and it tends to come down to not really having a plan. The way to deal with this is to help your players put a plan together of what they are going to do, because they in all likelihood are being vague because they don't know their options. Questions that ...


0

Is no one having fun, like he says, or is it just him? If he's not having fun, why is he still playing? You need to talk to him about whether or not he is really interested in playing in your game or not. Maybe he just wants to be there to hang out with friends, and could just spectate.


3

As I understand it, the characters are going to solve the puzzle anyway. because your story depends on them solving the puzzle. So I say, why bother if they will solve it? They do it. Eventually. In my opinion, the real challenge the characters face should be what it costs them to solve those puzzles. Time? Money? Health? Favors? Some other resource? The ...


2

Overview I've wrestled with this same problem a great deal over the years. I've tried many different strategies for solving it but most of my attempts have left much to be desired. Focusing solely on the dice rolling helps keep the game moving and prevents the puzzle from becoming boring and tedious, but at the same time you lose most of the novelty of ...


0

I'll try to play devil's advocate and argue in favor of this, and give some possible ideas for improvement. By extension, lack of these improvements can be interpreted as weaknesses for you to attack. The hole itself There's already several posts calculating the weight of dirt pushing on you. Suffice to say, dirt is heavy. I used to have a cat that ...


0

The best guideline I can offer to this question has to do with how much description you provide to your players about the room/setting that they encounter. The less description you provide, the fewer "things" there are available to search and the more easily you (or they) can roll a passive sort of detection/search check. You can choose to roll it ...


-3

IMHO, passive perception is for things that an ordinary person would notice under ordinary circumstances. In other words, the players are going to notice a dead horse laying in the road, but unless they're specifically on "high alert" they aren't going to notice the shadows moving in the trees. Checks for Passive Perception is to see if they in fact ...


2

The system and setting often contribute to my decisions in these cases. In a simulationist game with a deadly setting, you might intervene only as much to ask "Are you sure?" In pulpier, heroic games, you want to encourage your players to succeed; you may even incorporate their misconceptions to do so. I stole this idea from is 13th Age's One Unique Thing ...


1

If you don't mind spending some money Epic Generator is a picture generator, it can be quite pricey as you have to buy packs depending on what sort of character you want, but the visuals are pretty impressive. I've used it for a few characters before I ran out of money ;) Sample from their website: Otherwise some of my players use "Doll generators" (Just ...


5

I'm a little bit surprised to see so many answers to this question without what I thought was the obvious one, so I'm going to put it out here. What you have here is an obvious disconnect between what the player thought the situation was, and what you, the GM thought the situation was. Very seldom do players actually do things that they believe are ...


8

There are many character creators for fantasy games in computer gaming. The PC versions of many RPGs have extensive character creators. The Dragon Age series, and the World of Warcraft game have extensive customization options. There is also the custom miniature creator HeroForge - https://www.heroforge.com/ which is designed to let you visualize your own ...


4

There is a free web-based tool called Hero Machine. It has several versions -- modern, superhero, and fantasy, at least -- and does exactly what you're after. Character images are stored as text strings that allow the Hero Machine to recreate the illustration when reloaded, though you can also use a screen dumper or print-to-file to save an actual image ...


0

Not Cheaply There is a 2D character art program by Profantasy Software, unimaginatively named "Character Artist". It's an addon for the Campaign Cartographer suit of tools. It's rather a bit pricey though. As of writing this answer, Campaign Cartographer is $45 US, and Character Artist is $40 US. This has the advantage of being designed for fantasy ...


3

One thing you need to remember when running a game is that the players do not have the benefit of actually living out the experience being role-played (unless you're LARPing). They can't feel the invitation in their pocket, they don't remember personally being burned by the sensors on the gate last time they tried to climb them, so they aren't going to ...


0

Personally I'd go for something mechanically based. I.e. in the *D&D family I'd make everyone in the party try a Wisdom save (maybe starting from the character with the highest score to the lowest) and as soon as one of them makes it I'd explain what their characters seem to be missing. Even for games where "Wisdom" is not present you can use either ...


9

While a player might be distracted, forgetful, or just plain dumb, that does not mean his character is as well. Especially experienced characters should have a certain level of "safe" against player neglect, especially if the situation is touching on their area of expertise. Eriwan the Bard: "I can take two peasants, CHAAARG-" GM: "Err... Eriwan ...


5

I think you're doing the right thing based on the examples you've given. Realize there's several hurdles tabletop RPGs have which don't exist in other media, and leeway is necessary to clear them: Memory The fictional events and situations rest on the memory of the group. A common event in play is someone tries to do something ("I pick up the sword he ...


4

Based on this answer and my comment on it, someone suggested I write an answer as well. I think I'm going to go with a "monster-of-the-week" style of campaign. I think that because she likes to have closure on each story rather quickly, I can mimic TV Series as to provide players with 1 to 2 (tops) session(s)-long scenarios, using PCs as the "main cast" of ...


3

Perhaps have them make a check (perception to notice the alarm's tripwire, intelligence to remember the invitation, knowledge X to recall that this is a foe likely to wipe the floor with them.) If they succeed on the check, you can give the player the warning because their character has cleverly remembered or noticed it. If they fail, the player(s) will ...


-6

Your question and examples are inconsistent. Your question is about players doing something stupid. Your examples are about players forgetting something, and thus taking an action that would be stupid if (and only if) it were taken with full knowledge of the facts. If your player decides to take on the Tarrasque, despite having been told legends of it ...


2

This very much depends on the specific game, game master, group, and the group's expectations. Unless the game is explicitly about the PCs getting into trouble (Paranoia especially comes to mind) or if players are new or new to the system, I caution the players for the first few sessions. If they don't pick up on it, then I let them get into trouble and ...


23

Almost always, yes. You are their interface to reality and—sometimes—even to their own character's memory. Wanting to avoid the session going drastically pear-shaped just because of an oversight is a valid reason to step in and remind the player of something they've forgotten that their character wouldn't have. Doing it the way you suggest is perfectly ...


65

When things like this happen, I always give my players this chance to clarify/confirm, just like you've shown in the examples. My reasoning for this is simple: the game world and what is happening there is closer and more important for the characters than it is for the players. No matter how immersive your storytelling skills and how much everyone around the ...


41

A very good practive for running RPGs is to make sure that you always know what the players intend to accomplish with the actions they announce they want to do. The reverse is also true: Make sure that the players are having the facts right on which they base their plans. If you think the players are acting on the basis of false assumptions or ...


4

What I would suggest is that you need aim for what your friends want, or to be more accurate, need, as a change. Now that they're not interested in it would mean they're bored of it, so they want to do somthing else. They need improvements and changes that they expect, not only your ideas. So try re-inventing your game that suits all of the intended ...


5

If your girlfriend has trouble holding focus on a long-winding campaign, consider implementing an episodic storytelling mechanic - have each session be a continuous storyline, but also self-contained, so that they start with a premise and end with a resolution. Consider doing it 'monster-of-the-week' style, such that you can play through encountering, ...


5

Try proposing a reboot with a different system. I'm in the same situation and sometime I'm able to convince my old players to restart our abandoned games just proposing a different system. The idea of trying something new on the familiar ground of an old world with old companions, can do the magic and revive interest and motivation in some players.


15

It sounds like you're asking "Is it possible to get people excited about something they have explicitly said they are not interested in?" Yes, it's very possible! If you want to get someone excited about something they've told you they don't like very much, the most straightforward way to do so is to make the thing you want them to like, more like a thing ...



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