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12

None. The fundamental assumptions behind D&D 4e are not about realism drawn from the game world; they've simplified the game by making the rules come first. So the answer is "none..." You know where the ground is, so it hovers above the ground, regardless of interesting physics tricks. You have to treat it like Magic: The Gathering or whatnot, ...


10

No, you can not ride a Tenser's Floating Disk. There is a definitive, and official answer from the WoTC 3.5 FAQ (Pg. 91); Can you ride your own Tenser’s floating disk? No. While you could command your Tenser’s floating disk to move close enough for you to sit upon it, it has no ability to move under its own power. It can follow you only at a maximum ...


10

I don't believe the rules ever formally state what exactly is or is not "ground." With that said, here's what I would use to evaluate this: Does the item have a large enough surface area to support the disk? Does the item have a reasonably uniform surface? (i.e. not someone's head and shoulders, not steeply angled, etc.). How much weight can the item ...


8

"The ground" counts as the ground for Tenser's Floating Disk. It can't be tricked, exploited, or fooled, because it's magic and not physics.


7

The disc always floats 1 foot off the ground. The rules say: You create a slightly concave, circular plane of force that floats a foot off the ground and can carry what you lay upon it. The disk is 3 feet in diameter and 1 inch deep at its center. It remains stationary unless you move more than 5 squares away from it, in which case it moves with your ...


5

The Ground is the Battle Map. While this answer will not satisfy the simulationists out there, it is probably the unspoken principle upon which D&D 4E, a combat-heavy system, is designed around. All the descriptions of various things that I've read talk about things that could be "on the ground" or are different from ground. For example, Tremorsense ...


4

You could certainly ride it, it just has no propulsion of its own. So by itself, it wouldn't do much good, and certainly wouldn't be equivalent to a mount. But there are still some uses. For instance, my wizard in the Skulls and Shackles campaign (Pathfinder, but close enough) used a Floating Disk with a long pole cut from a sapling as a skiff to cross a ...


3

As others have pointed out, it has no propulsion of its own, merely following the caster around. However if you have a familiar with the share spells ability, you can cast spells with a range of self on your familiar (http://www.d20srd.org/srd/classes/sorcererWizard.htm). This includes Tenser's Floating Disk ...


3

I'd say the ground under the disk does need to be able to support the disk - it's meant to be read as an "effectively infinite" source of upward force. But, I'd say it doesn't need to be uniform or such. It's essentially a hovercart - it can detect the force it's applying to things on it, apply the necessary counterforce to keep them from falling off, and ...


1

I think the usage of the word "ground" in the description is meant to be interpreted in the same kind of way "ground" is interpreted in electrical circuits - as an effectively infinite source of upward force. Thus, Tensor's Floating Disk would be assumed to transfer exactly as much weight as is on it to the ground below it. Its value is not in being able to ...



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