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63

It came from the fans of White Wolf's World of Darkness games. "Splat" is another name for the asterisk character ('*'), which is often used as a placeholder or "wild card" in a name by technical types of people. Someone somewhere starting referring to all of WW's various Clanbook/Tribebook/Guildbook/Kithbook supplements for their various games as "*books", ...


41

There is no name for the full set other than "a set of polyhedral dice." If I need to distinguish it from another set of polyhedral dice: I would say a Set of polyhedral dice suitable for playing DnD, as compared to a Set of dice for playing L5R (10d10) or a Set of dice suitable for playing Dilettante (10 d8s and 10 d4s) History The d4, d6, d8, d12, ...


29

A "funnel" is an adventure designed to take in a large number of 1st- or 0th-level characters and spit out just the survivors, if any. The metaphor is the shape of the PC pool: large at the entrance, small at the exit. The term was coined by, and comes from the way character creation works in, Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG: each player creates and plays four ...


21

History The reason for the set mix as it exists is that, originally, the dice available were a set of platonic solids, sold by an educational company and repurposed by TSR. Namely, a tetrahedron (d4), cube (square hexahedron, d6), equilateral octohedron (d8), dodecahedron (d12), icosahedron (d20). This was a "platonic solids" set. D20's were routinely read ...


16

A bit of history "Story Game" has been used in many different ways, but at least in the context to Dungeon World, it has a definite lineage. The term as associated use today, was first coined by Clinton R. Nixon (I believe around 2006-2007?) as a simple and catchy term for Narrativist games. This allowed a way to promote these types of games without ...


9

They're the Apocalypse auspice names run backward using Grimm's Law. Developer Ethan Skemp says the following about the Uratha First Tongue: The root of most First Tongue stuff is Sumerian, then run back through Grimm's Law. Step Three is where it gets really complicated, though, as many — and I mean many — a word is not at all literally the un-Grimmed ...


9

Creature is basically every living breathing (or undead) thing big enough to be considered at least CR0 (give or take). It's important to note that "creature" does not get a precise definition in the rules. However, we can infer from BD&D p4 that it includes both the PCs and the creatures they encounter. Sometimes the adventurers and other creatures ...


8

There are a few key terms which have changed their meaning from all previous editions. Saving Throws: (Or Saves) These correspond to one of your 6 ability scores, rather than special categories. Proficiency: You may use any item or weapon without proficiency. However, there will be drawbacks or a lack of bonus. When you do have proficiency in an item or ...


8

Short answer: 5e is a new edition, a new system. Players shouldn't assume the same terms mean the same thing as any previous editions, and they should read the rules carefully. Long answer: Please understand that I think the question is too broad, and I'll try to show why in this answer. First, many same terms have meant many different things in 2/3/4e. ...


7

The manufacturers (Chessex, Gamescience, etc.) just refer to them as 7 die sets.


5

A term I have read, heard, and used in conversation (which to my mind indicates a fairly broad understanding in the community) is just, "seven-set." As in, "Joe got a cool new seven-set with steampunk gears."


5

The D4, D6, D8, D12 and D20 collectively are known as the Platonic Solids, however there is no commonly accepted name for a set of these dice plus the two percentile D10s other than a "Dice Set" or "Polyhedral Dice". See this Wikipedia entry for more information.


5

In the context of adventures and campaigns, the word "funnel" in my experience usually refers to the use of several "common" people (0-level in AD&D nomenclature) that find themselves in an "uncommon" situation that they have to resolve. The number of people outnumbers the number of players in general- because it is expected that there will be deaths- ...


5

The answer is yes, Animate object would work on a corpse. The exact effect would depend on the size of the corpse. While there are specific defined terms in D&D 5e there are also a equal number of that rely on what the word means in English. Object - a material thing that can be seen and touched. Creature - an animal or person. However there is a ...


4

The Load (Warning: TV Tropes) Basically they are someone that is just a 'load' that gets dragged around by the hero, but either doesn't really do anything productive most of the time and the hero has to spend time that they could use saving the world protecting this load from harm.


4

There likely isn't one. Proving a negative is hard, but the list of available words is small, the amount of RPG systems numbers in the thousands, and each RPG system is going to be using multiple such terms, and they're probably going to find their own separate usages for them. (Fate for instance uses scene, scenario, and conflict, and to mean different ...


3

Here are the answers I have so far: "Ragabash" is English; it means "ragamuffin" or "A shiftless, disreputable fellow." "Galliard" is from Old French; it means "lively, brisk, high-spirited." It's also a dance. "Philodox" goes back to Greek, meaning "opinion-lover." Someone enraptured with his own ideas. "Ahroun" is of unknown provenance, but probably ...


2

Parallel Spell Options Looking closely at the two spells in question, I was surprised to find that having Animate Objects instead of Animate Dead is actually pretty balanced as far as game mechanics go. At 5th Level, both Animate Dead & Animate Objects animates the same amount of medium sized corpses, at with larger bodies or higher levels, Animate ...


1

Without context, I would assume the normal English usage of the word, which is quite different than the two RPG-specific answers posted before me. A funnel takes things that are spread out and brings them together. Like if you set up events so that your characters could take several paths, but at the end they will get 'funneled' to the main boss regardless ...


1

In general... A Storygame is a game where the mechanics are mostly about driving the narrative, rather than resolution of actions. A primary example of a storygame is Fiasco - in fiasco, you don't resolve actions - you resolve scenes. Either a positive or a negative outcome, but it's a rsolution to the scene and the scene's dilema, not to a specific ...



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