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19

First thing to remember is the definition of terrain in a combat/encounter framework: Terrain is anything that is not a character or monster combatant. Terrain is not just the ground the PCs are standing on. It is the furniture, atmosphere, weather, walls, ceiling, non-combatant plants and creatures, dead-bodies (real dead, not undead), fire, water, ...


19

There is Dizzy Dragon's generator which has a variety of layouts and is oriented to Moldavy B/x D&D. There is Donjon's generator which has D&D 3.5 and D&D 4.0 options. But the layout are strictly room and corridor. Both create the encounters for you. Of the two Dizzy Dragon is the best.


15

There are no specific rules regarding this, and the DMG leaves it up the to the DM. Your 1d4 for shattered glass seems reasonable (on par with a dagger); I might even bump that to 1d6 (have you seen what glass can do to someone? It's not a pretty sight). However, there are base guidelines for hazards and traps based on the character level and the amount of ...


14

The rules for webs are detailed in the Dungeon Master's Guide on page 105: ...web-filled areas are difficult terrain... a creature entering a webbed area for the first time on a turn or starting its turn there must succeed on a DC 12 Dexterity saving throw or become restrained by the webs. A restrained creature can use its action to try and escape, doing ...


13

You might want Dizzy Dragon's generator. It does encounters and treasure, although no random encounters. The dungeons are generated from geomorphs, so the maps are more complex and interesting than the fully random versions. Each map will have some three dimensionality, with stairs up to some sections and so forth.


11

The most portable terrain type is also the least convertible: papercraft. There are piles and piles of papercraft building, landscape, cave, etc. terrain PDFs out there, but of course whatever's printed on the terrain is what's printed. Personally, I like papercraft because it's quick and you can generate a large amount of terrain quickly relatively cheaply,...


11

I think two other comments (here and here) do a good job of answering your questions; I am grappling with the same challenge of late. I want dynamic encounters that test characters beyond just run up and hit the baddie. When tinkering with an encounter I always look at it from the perspective of . . . what other ways can the players use their characters to ...


11

Nothing, but the webs may shrivel a bit. Spiderwebs, contrary to 3.5's web spell, aren't flammable. (TvTropes, A literature review on google scholar suggests that TvTropes is correct, but there exist no trivially viewable papers on "how to burn spider webs.") On the other hand, this "real" conception of spider-silk may contrast so forcefully with how we ...


10

I'd say that creating a controlled, artificial scenario that accurately demonstrates cross-class character effectiveness is impossible. The reason for this is that a great part of what makes a character (class) powerful is that character's ability to choose his own scenarios. In other words, creating a "fair fight" will ignore characters' ability and ...


10

The D&D 4th Edition rules for Overland Speed essentially breaks down to this: 1 unit of speed = 5 mi/day, 0.5 MPH, or 50 ft/min. The D&DI Compendium references PHB page 283, with the following chart: Speed Per Day Per Hour Per Minute 5 25 miles 2½ miles 250 ft. 6 30 miles 3 miles 300 ft. 7 35 miles 3½ ...


10

The walls around the door still count as corners, so page 147 of the PHB still stands: You can’t move diagonally past a corner (even by taking a 5-foot step). If it was a double door, you could move diagonally so long as you didn't move through a corner. |A1|A2|A3|A4| |B1|B2|B3|B4| |==|C2|C3|==| |D1|D2|D3|D4| Moving from D3 or B3 into C2 is legal as ...


8

I remember coming across this very same things years ago when I started running games, I wanted my players to be inherently more creative than the run up & bash method of combat. What I discovered is that players will become creative when they are comfortable enough to be creative. What this means is that you need to show them it is ok to branch out and ...


8

There are specific rules covering drowning in the Dungeon Master's Guide at least for players (but it isn't a far stretch to apply them to monsters), but your DM has called it on the spot that the creature has just perished in the water. If it were a player/NPC/monster that was in some way critical to the story/encounter, then it may have been preferable to ...


8

I only have a basic understanding of the principles of stone sculpting and any insights are appreciated. Use your imagination. What do you want it to look like? D&D 5e is not reality simulation, nor does it attempt to be. Difficult terrain is ground that is hard to walk on, an area where you are slowed down by trying to move through it. This ...


7

D&D 4th Edition doesn't appear to define it, and that isn't surprising. Unlike previous editions, 4e doesn't care so much about simulating the world or engaging in that level of detail. It offers much more high-level abstract rules alongside suggestions about how or when to apply them, and the designers weren't interested in going into such a specific ...


7

Because they are different. Note, the water described in a marsh terrain is a "deep bog". The water described in aquatic terrain is just water. The environments are intended to be different and thus have different rules. The rules are not "complimentary" or additive. Total cover for being underwater is somewhat of an oversimplification of refraction and ...


7

There's no reason to employ a mechanical solution here, go with the narrative one that makes sense. If you want to have a mechanical solution, employ a skill challenge to determine if the charges are set properly, wired together proplerly, are lit properly, ignite correctly and in sequence, and then use the results to determine how effectively destroyed ...


7

Lego (other plastic building blocks are available). I used them when playing D&D with my brothers many years ago. We had a medieval set, which was just perfect for battles with men in armour. However, you can get the building blocks in a variety of colours, and there are plenty of modern sets. If purchasing new blocks, they can be bought by weight like ...


7

The examples you gave sound about right. It's generally reasonable to consider something encountered abruptly, like a floor, window, or other object much like an improvised weapon, see PHB, p147. As for acid, spikes, lava, fire, and so forth, often there are spells that provide some guidelines, although it depends greatly on the specifics. Did the PC get ...


6

For some tiles, you may want to do a Google search on heroquest or warhammer for tile. Here's a few links for tiles: http://greywolf.critter.net/tiles.htm http://www.fortunecity.com/underworld/roadrash/317/dungeon/wqdgncrd.html http://www.donjon-esselcay.org/ (in french - click door to open, tiles are in pieces de donjon) http://kurt.helborg.free.fr/...


6

For Necromunda games we used corrugated cardboard spraypainted grey then written on with thick black marker pen. We cut slots to attach pieces to other pieces (with liberal use of bluetack and sellotape) to build towers and walkways and ramps and walls and all sorts. Part of the setup of every game was taking it in turns to grab a bit of terrain and stick it ...


6

No, the sky isn't terrain. “Terrain” is a word that means “land of a particular kind”, which obviously doesn't include sky. However, you don't need to replace a piece of mountain with sky. Replace it with another terrain instead: a bit of plain. Same effect, without the need to abuse the English language to justify it. Note also that the 150-foot cube that ...


5

I'm sure this won't be the most satisfactory answer, but I would be tempted to approach this problem using my percent dice. Really, the trick is just in picking a suitable "percent chance" that each factor might occur. For example, in response to your points, I came up with something like this: For every 15 feet travelled, roll the percent dice. The ...


5

As others have said, the classes are balanced for different purposes. Were I to do something similar, my first instinct would be to give a varying coliseum. There is also no such thing as a fair fight. Put two fighters in tight a enclosure, arm one wiht a dagger and the other with a polearm. Chances are, the polearm fighter will likely hit first, the ...


5

It ain't pretty, but for quick and dirty 3d terrain nothing I've encountered beats Construx. They're a building toy from the late 80s that never quite got as mainstream as Legos. Anyway the flat panels are almost the right size to line up with a traditional grid if you mark them with a sharpee or line them with thin black tape. Best of all, they can be ...


5

Chessex manufactures grid maps that you can draw upon, with water-soluble markers ("overhead" pens). These are available with a variety of pre-printed patterns, so you can get those with hexes, squares, and so on. I personally use a mixture of one of these mats, "dungeon tiles" (tiles of various shapes with terrain pictures on them, plus pre-printed grid ...


5

I'm not sure about papercraft, specifically; but, I've seen a lot of people at conventions transport a variety of model terrain using large plastic buckets or tubs (with lids). I think this would probably work well, as long as you avoid mixing large, heavy items with structures that are very light and fragile. I would sort out the items according to size, ...


5

I do not think so. The balance in Pathfinder, which is largely unchanged from 3.5, is very close to non-existent. Really, your basic premise is flawed: it has little to do with terrain. If a Cleric or Wizard knows what to expect, they can manage at the very least to create situations where the odds are, as they say, forever in their favor. A Fighter or ...


5

I found a hot knife and foam board to be handy for making the basic form for buildings. In a campaign I recently ran, it worked quite well for building a ziggurat with a long staircase, and it allows you to cut the 1" squares right into the surface. But it also makes a good terrain base. Add some ground cover, pebbles, rocks, whatever is needed and paint ...


5

A creature usually can't take a 5-foot step to enter a square that hampers the creature's movement When determining the movement costs for hampered movement, the game usually doesn't care where the creature is and instead cares where the creature's going: Difficult terrain, obstacles, and poor visibility can hamper movement (see Table: Hampered Movement ...



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