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32

When a player is hogging the limelight like this, the way to deal with the situation is to stop encouraging them. The player is getting their fun by having everyone's attention focused on them (see this question for a similar situation). (This isn't a bad thing, by the way! It just means you have to make sure that the rest of the group gets their fun, too.) ...


26

As Marshall said, you need to find out why John takes so long to choose an action. There are several possible reasons, and each calls for slightly different handling. 1. John is nervous, shy, or otherwise has trouble speaking unless prompted. In this case, the best thing you can do is to have a set of verbal prompts to help him convey his actions quickly. ...


21

Well, Rope Trick descriptions reads as follow: The upper end is, in fact, fastened to an extradimensional space that is outside the multiverse of extradimensional spaces (“planes”). Well, what is an "extradimensional space" then? A number of spells and magic items utilize extradimensional spaces, such as rope trick, a bag of holding, a handy ...


21

Fiction First Hi Marc. You are running into one of the differences between rules-first systems and fiction-first systems. Fiction-first means that the rules serve the story unfolding between the players: When something happens in the story that matches a trigger condition in the rules, the mechanics engage and the results feed back into the story. Outside ...


20

In Pathfinder, you take actions on your turn. Normally, everyone gets a turn in each round. So in a one-on-one situation, you will take a turn, and your opponent will take a turn, and both together make up a single round. You will get ten turns before the spell expires, one in each round. You’d get the same ten turns in the ten-man brawl; everyone gets one ...


20

First of all, you don't need any rules precedent to integrate time travel into your campaign, as D.M. its your prerogative to add any feature into your world that you please. That being said, there is some precedent that is applicable in this situation! In the source book The Plane Above - The Secrets of the Astral Sea we get a direct, although short, ...


19

According to the traditional summoner's eidolon class feature, this isn't a problem unless the GM says it is... The traditional Pathfinder summoner's eidolon class feature says that A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons ...


19

Yes, combat is supposed to be this quick. Caveat: Since you are at low levels, and both monsters/party have low hit points, you may find that this changes. That will be determined by the complexity of the challenge you present to the party, how smart the enemy is, as well as how many minions are there. The difference between a running battle or a static ...


18

So you only have enough time for either finishing off the adventure, or dealing with random encounters, but not both. Therefore any solution requires spending very little time. Simple Narration One acceptable way to handle it seems to be to narrate it away. It's entirely legitimate to narrate their travel through the wilderness and cut to the chase, so to ...


17

Game time calendar Our group solves the exact problem you are describing using a game time calendar. This is essentially exactly what it sounds like: a table listing dates in a column, with checkboxes next to them on which we can mark the passing of days. We also left some space for short notes. We used this extensively in a very long sandbox like fantasy ...


15

Yes.... and No. Your confusion is about how timing is handled in RPGs. Typically the 6 second rounds only are used during combat or other time critical events/encounters. In the general course of gaming, you dont need to specify what you are doing in every 6 second block. Sometimes you act in 'real time' when conversing with an NPC (though perhaps not so ...


15

D&D 5e turns are completely different from AD&D turns, and only share the name. The AD&D meaning of “turn” as being ten rounds* in combat time (or ten minutes in exploration time) last appeared in AD&D 2nd edition, and has been eliminated from editions newer than 1999. In D&D 5e, a turn has the same meaning as it does in a card game or ...


14

Tracking time assiduously used to be a normal part of RPGs in the 70s and 80s, but it seems to have become a lost skill. The answer is to actually track the time as it passes in-game. Know how long actions take, and estimate other things in blocks of time. The players have a discussion about strategy? 10 minutes. They travel overland? Mark how many hours ...


14

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


14

Sorta There are things you can do make large battle scenes more tolerable in PF/3.5, such as; Grouping Attacks - Similar units with similar attacks are grouped into 'volley' attacks that are dodged with either a saving throw, or are fewer attacks that deal more damage. Placing Fights - creating larger 'maps' for fights with terrain that separates groups ...


14

If we go by your logic, as long as they like because if, after stepping off they decide not to use any movement then they hover in place. From this we can conclude that they are not using their movement to move; they are in fact falling. If we ignore a lot of real world effects like friction, the elasticity of the rope, the fact that the rope is not ...


13

I think it's safe to assume Normal (or whatever the plane you're casting the Rope Trick in is doing) unless something explicitly says different - or the GM decides it would be fun to have it work another way.


13

Wish removes it by making it not happen when you leave The effect referred to is discovering that time has passed at a different rate while you were gone. Wish can be used to remove the effect of time passing at a different rate while in the Feywild — it doesn't remove the effect when it isn't affecting the creatures, after they've left the Feywild. Once ...


12

Time is still handled as days, hours and minutes. Past that things get a bit more cloudy with dates tending to be down to the campaign setting being used, e.g. Eberron has 12 months, starting with Zarantyr, whereas Forgotten Realms has 12 months, starting with Hammer Eberron calendar Forgotten Realms calendar


12

Sometimes, rewards and incentive are motivational enough on their own. In a tabletop RPG like this where bonus exp, gold, or any other non mundane item gifted to a player for doing something that is largely required by the player as a means of character maintenance after each session and before the next is going to lead to unfair advantages when 1 or 2 of ...


10

Usually one doesn't count the total rounds of a combat just to do it. You might be counting them because of spell durations or other specific reasons. In general you're concerned about overall passage of time because of torch and other large scale durations, which is why this rule exists, so players don't say "well that only took three rounds so we move on ...


10

You're going to have to work it out with your GM. The only place that I'm aware of in the Pathfinder rules that ever mentions time travel on a scale greater than rounds is the Scepter of Ages that you mentioned, and I only know about that because of your post. Time travel isn't really a thing that's standard to PF, and so the rules, and how precisely time ...


10

Player-to-player Communication How much meta-gaming is acceptable at your table, generally? If "little-to-no" is the basic agreement among the group, you have grounds to object to his breaking the group agreement. If "we do it quite a bit" then it's hard to object on that basis. From your description: Furthermore, he often tries to RP things as ...


10

I did run a 3-hour game of torchbearer a few days ago, in which the players took 8 turns (including 2 full conflicts) exploring 5 rooms to some extent. In my game today, a bit over three hours included 7 tests exploring 9 rooms very carefully with many good ideas, significantly helped by the fact they were only 2 (so less coordination and repetition ...


10

In real life sword fights (or whatever weapon you use) don't tend to last very long. Only in the movies they are long, drawn-out affairs that involve going back and forth, down hallways, up stairs, past other fights and over narrow walkways with something nasty waiting at the bottom. Maybe they do if you're a bard, rogue or other type of swashbuckler or ...


9

Counters are a really useful tool. You give each player a (for example) red counter per ration they have, or other limited resource they need to spend every set amount of time. The DM gets 23 black counters that are each 1 hour, 5 blue counters that are each 10 mins, 9 green counters that are 1 minute each, and so on. Then when time passes you move a counter ...


9

1 Simple task = 15 mins/ .25hours & 1 complex task = 1 hour Crafting, training, and other more long term tasks are handled fairly well in the books with concrete requirements and values given for making a magic item or learning a new tool proficiency. The rules however fail to cover everything that happens between those 6 second combat rounds and the ...


9

Four (Base rules) Five (Including hero point rules) Ten (Or unlimited) (Including hero point and mythic rules) (In one round) You can: Cast a spell via a standard action Cast a spell via a swift action (Quicken spell et al.) Cast/activate a spell from a contingency As a magus use your offhand to attack with a weapon and activate a spell storing weapon ...



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