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63

I see two primary ways to approach this, depending on the travel. (TL;DR at the end) Travelling through civilized lands From your description, it seems like your players (who are, considering you are playing D&D4e, are basically powerful heroes) are travelling between two cities in a civilized nation. In this case, I'm not even sure if I'd run any kind ...


26

As Marshall said, you need to find out why John takes so long to choose an action. There are several possible reasons, and each calls for slightly different handling. 1. John is nervous, shy, or otherwise has trouble speaking unless prompted. In this case, the best thing you can do is to have a set of verbal prompts to help him convey his actions quickly. ...


21

Well, Rope Trick descriptions reads as follow: The upper end is, in fact, fastened to an extradimensional space that is outside the multiverse of extradimensional spaces (“planes”). Well, what is an "extradimensional space" then? A number of spells and magic items utilize extradimensional spaces, such as rope trick, a bag of holding, a handy ...


20

In Pathfinder, you take actions on your turn. Normally, everyone gets a turn in each round. So in a one-on-one situation, you will take a turn, and your opponent will take a turn, and both together make up a single round. You will get ten turns before the spell expires, one in each round. You’d get the same ten turns in the ten-man brawl; everyone gets one ...


17

Game time calendar Our group solves the exact problem you are describing using a game time calendar. This is essentially exactly what it sounds like: a table listing dates in a column, with checkboxes next to them on which we can mark the passing of days. We also left some space for short notes. We used this extensively in a very long sandbox like fantasy ...


15

So you only have enough time for either finishing off the adventure, or dealing with random encounters, but not both. Therefore any solution requires spending very little time. Simple Narration One acceptable way to handle it seems to be to narrate it away. It's entirely legitimate to narrate their travel through the wilderness and cut to the chase, so to ...


15

Yes.... and No. Your confusion is about how timing is handled in RPGs. Typically the 6 second rounds only are used during combat or other time critical events/encounters. In the general course of gaming, you dont need to specify what you are doing in every 6 second block. Sometimes you act in 'real time' when conversing with an NPC (though perhaps not so ...


13

Tracking time assiduously used to be a normal part of RPGs in the 70s and 80s, but it seems to have become a lost skill. The answer is to actually track the time as it passes in-game. Know how long actions take, and estimate other things in blocks of time. The players have a discussion about strategy? 10 minutes. They travel overland? Mark how many hours ...


13

I think it's safe to assume Normal (or whatever the plane you're casting the Rope Trick in is doing) unless something explicitly says different - or the GM decides it would be fun to have it work another way.


13

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


12

Wish removes it by making it not happen when you leave The effect referred to is discovering that time has passed at a different rate while you were gone. Wish can be used to remove the effect of time passing at a different rate while in the Feywild — it doesn't remove the effect when it isn't affecting the creatures, after they've left the Feywild. Once ...


11

Time is still handled as days, hours and minutes. Past that things get a bit more cloudy with dates tending to be down to the campaign setting being used, e.g. Eberron has 12 months, starting with Zarantyr, whereas Forgotten Realms has 12 months, starting with Hammer Eberron calendar Forgotten Realms calendar


10

Playing short form requires several shifts in technique and approach. My group typically does 2-3 hour sessions. A 4 hour session is a marathon for us. Drop the Filler The first thing to do is let go of filler material. Filler material includes setting up adventures that are "clue to clue to clue to oh actually interesting development". This is the ...


9

Usually one doesn't count the total rounds of a combat just to do it. You might be counting them because of spell durations or other specific reasons. In general you're concerned about overall passage of time because of torch and other large scale durations, which is why this rule exists, so players don't say "well that only took three rounds so we move on ...


9

Counters are a really useful tool. You give each player a (for example) red counter per ration they have, or other limited resource they need to spend every set amount of time. The DM gets 23 black counters that are each 1 hour, 5 blue counters that are each 10 mins, 9 green counters that are 1 minute each, and so on. Then when time passes you move a counter ...


9

TL;DR: Skip random encounters, make encounters during travel meaningful for the story. Travel, as any other part of game you play out, should have a purpose. Actually, it should have several purposes: Involve the players, let the characters shine, move the story forward, add to the world. If all you'd do with traveling is get to a new place where the ...


8

Yes, I do this kind of thing all the time in my supers games. I usually go with the first option; decide how long they have, then convert that into a game-measurable limit (the system I use calls them "panels"), but then if my players start getting bogged down in tactics I cut them off and say "Uh, guys? Clock's ticking, here." It helps that they rarely ...


8

The problem with introducing a real world timer, in my opinion, is that the characters most likely know more about how to handle such situations than the your players do (well, unless your players are professional negotiators and/or SWAT people.) In my experience it's quite natural for players to discuss strategy and tactics, especially in critical ...


8

To add to fgysin's answer, if your campaign takes place over longer scales, with travel taking e.g. weeks, quad paper becomes useful: In this case you'd use either a separate sheet, the other side of the paper or the right half for notes. Cross over days that go past with nothing significant happening, but use a number for notes if something is important: ...


8

Gantt Charts I've been spending a lot of time solving the problem of "what ELSE is happening?", and settled on the Gantt chart method. I can map out what is happening in parallel timeframes, dependencies, sequences, and triggers. During the game, I get access to the master chart (PDF copy, for instance) and simply make manual updates in pencil mid-game. ...


7

Different flows of time can effectively happen in your D&D game, across a portal between two planes or across the surface of a Planar Shepard character's bubble. What really happens at the boundary is never specified by the rules. The most common interpretation you can find on forums is that a creature can either be at one side or the other, because ...


7

Just use combat rounds This battle is against time. Have characters roll initiative and proceed in order, describing their actions according to the chart Actions in Combat. It's perfectly acceptable to explain to the players beforehand that this is not a combat encounter and that you're using combat mechanics to simulate a ticking clock, especially if ...


6

Initiative and rounds are used only during combat or other situations where precise timing is crucial. Otherwise, time moves “narratively” – it may move faster or slower than the time you, the player, are spending playing. As for combat, a round is six seconds long. Remember, in theory you are playing as an actual person, who is actively ...


6

Those are round during combat. When you're in combat things slow down hugely and the action is tracked in detail at the resolution of rounds. You don't use combat rounds for just wandering around, looking at things, and talking to people. Elsewhen, you just play and time passes in a sensible fashion ("Ok, so you're going to take some time to research in the ...


6

There are two methods that I see here. If your system has PC skills this is a great time for a non-combat skill challenge. for instance in D&D 4e we would use skills like nature and endurance to stay on a path or out of the way of wild/dangerous animals, and to have the stamina to continue. We would use things like Diplomacy, Bluff and Intimidate to ...


6

Addressing this as a "What should I do?" instead of as "round limit or real-time limit", I think you might be looking at this the wrong way. Consider what SWAT teams (and other such organizations) do during a hostage situation. The essential problem with hostage situations is that its assumed that under ordinary breach circumstances the hostage takers (HTs) ...


6

Presuming a single "canonical" timeline, with alterations to that timeline always having had been true, the language you're looking for can be found in the Continuum role playing game. You can get a sample glossary, sans philosophy, at the Continuum glossary. Of particular import are the concepts of "up/down." and "age/yet". Therefore, "Down [in the ...


6

All of the above, and then some. I believe the intent of the "Wish" addendum is actually that it be cast before or during the excursion to the Feywild causing the time to pass at the same rate for those individuals. The metaphysics of that only happening for a handful of people screws with my head a bit but it seems to be the least complicated mechanical ...


6

1 Simple task = 15 mins/ .25hours & 1 complex task = 1 hour Crafting, training, and other more long term tasks are handled fairly well in the books with concrete requirements and values given for making a magic item or learning a new tool proficiency. The rules however fail to cover everything that happens between those 6 second combat rounds and the ...


5

I’ve never heard of anyone ruling that it flows any differently from Normal. Certainly, without an explicit statement that it does, it would be very odd to assume that it’s supposed to operate at a different speed.



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