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20

In Pathfinder, you take actions on your turn. Normally, everyone gets a turn in each round. So in a one-on-one situation, you will take a turn, and your opponent will take a turn, and both together make up a single round. You will get ten turns before the spell expires, one in each round. You’d get the same ten turns in the ten-man brawl; everyone gets one ...


20

Fiction First Hi Marc. You are running into one of the differences between rules-first systems and fiction-first systems. Fiction-first means that the rules serve the story unfolding between the players: When something happens in the story that matches a trigger condition in the rules, the mechanics engage and the results feed back into the story. Outside ...


20

First of all, you don't need any rules precedent to integrate time travel into your campaign, as D.M. its your prerogative to add any feature into your world that you please. That being said, there is some precedent that is applicable in this situation! In the source book The Plane Above - The Secrets of the Astral Sea we get a direct, although short, ...


19

According to the traditional summoner's eidolon class feature, this isn't a problem unless the GM says it is... The traditional Pathfinder summoner's eidolon class feature says that A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons ...


18

When a player is hogging the limelight like this, the way to deal with the situation is to stop encouraging them. The player is getting their fun by having everyone's attention focused on them (see this question for a similar situation). (This isn't a bad thing, by the way! It just means you have to make sure that the rest of the group gets their fun, too.) ...


17

Game time calendar Our group solves the exact problem you are describing using a game time calendar. This is essentially exactly what it sounds like: a table listing dates in a column, with checkboxes next to them on which we can mark the passing of days. We also left some space for short notes. We used this extensively in a very long sandbox like fantasy ...


12

Wish removes it by making it not happen when you leave The effect referred to is discovering that time has passed at a different rate while you were gone. Wish can be used to remove the effect of time passing at a different rate while in the Feywild — it doesn't remove the effect when it isn't affecting the creatures, after they've left the Feywild. Once ...


10

Playing short form requires several shifts in technique and approach. My group typically does 2-3 hour sessions. A 4 hour session is a marathon for us. Drop the Filler The first thing to do is let go of filler material. Filler material includes setting up adventures that are "clue to clue to clue to oh actually interesting development". This is the ...


10

You're going to have to work it out with your GM. The only place that I'm aware of in the Pathfinder rules that ever mentions time travel on a scale greater than rounds is the Scepter of Ages that you mentioned, and I only know about that because of your post. Time travel isn't really a thing that's standard to PF, and so the rules, and how precisely time ...


8

Player-to-player Communication How much meta-gaming is acceptable at your table, generally? If "little-to-no" is the basic agreement among the group, you have grounds to object to his breaking the group agreement. If "we do it quite a bit" then it's hard to object on that basis. From your description: Furthermore, he often tries to RP things as ...


8

Gantt Charts I've been spending a lot of time solving the problem of "what ELSE is happening?", and settled on the Gantt chart method. I can map out what is happening in parallel timeframes, dependencies, sequences, and triggers. During the game, I get access to the master chart (PDF copy, for instance) and simply make manual updates in pencil mid-game. ...


8

To add to fgysin's answer, if your campaign takes place over longer scales, with travel taking e.g. weeks, quad paper becomes useful: In this case you'd use either a separate sheet, the other side of the paper or the right half for notes. Cross over days that go past with nothing significant happening, but use a number for notes if something is important: ...


7

Just use combat rounds This battle is against time. Have characters roll initiative and proceed in order, describing their actions according to the chart Actions in Combat. It's perfectly acceptable to explain to the players beforehand that this is not a combat encounter and that you're using combat mechanics to simulate a ticking clock, especially if ...


7

All of the above, and then some. I believe the intent of the "Wish" addendum is actually that it be cast before or during the excursion to the Feywild causing the time to pass at the same rate for those individuals. The metaphysics of that only happening for a handful of people screws with my head a bit but it seems to be the least complicated mechanical ...


6

1 Simple task = 15 mins/ .25hours & 1 complex task = 1 hour Crafting, training, and other more long term tasks are handled fairly well in the books with concrete requirements and values given for making a magic item or learning a new tool proficiency. The rules however fail to cover everything that happens between those 6 second combat rounds and the ...


6

Presuming a single "canonical" timeline, with alterations to that timeline always having had been true, the language you're looking for can be found in the Continuum role playing game. You can get a sample glossary, sans philosophy, at the Continuum glossary. Of particular import are the concepts of "up/down." and "age/yet". Therefore, "Down [in the ...


6

This largely depends on both you and your group. Do they want a lot of random encounters? Would they prefer to just play the module out? Do you want to throw things in the mix to interfere? Hoard of the Dragon Queen, and the Rise of Tiamat, both allow for a lot of flexibility. In addition, they use milestone levels instead of XP based levels. So encounters ...


4

Yes, even during the spell time stop an effect that ends at the conclusion of the casting creature's turn still ends at the conclusion the casting creature's turn The 9th-level Sor/Wiz spell time stop says In fact, you speed up so greatly that all other creatures seem frozen, though they are actually still moving at their normal speeds. You are free to ...


4

There are a number of disciplines that use timelines, not just RPGs. As a result, there are a number of tools for tracking them. While I was already aware of Aeon Timeline, it is OSX-only as well as commercial software. While we are used to investing in our hobby, I thought I should see if I could find some more options. This blog post brought a number of ...


4

You need to go back and read the basic rules in The Combat Round and Actions In Combat. How time and actions work in Pathfinder isn't simple enough to fully explain in a RPG.SE answer. The key is to divorce talk of "actions" - specific things your character does - from "rounds" and "turns." You can take multiple actions on your turn (like a standard and a ...


4

The way I read it, the wish spell makes time pass at the same rate. So 4 years in the Feywild equals 4 years in their regular realm. So the question is, does the party know at which rate time is going compared to theirs in the Feywild? After all, I wouldn't change it if I gained a huge amount of exp and got to go back to my regular life after only a little ...


3

I believe the easiest way to manage this in a way that is intuitive to both you and the players and that doesn't force you to keep a log book of minutes and seconds is this: Draw a circle and color the top half yellow and the bottom half blue. Label the left side morning and the right side evening. Noon is obviously straight up and midnight straight down ...


2

If you are looking at the timeline from 1st to 5th edition, then it is a timespan of about 132 years. 1st edition was set in 1357 DR, while 5th edition (The Sundering) is placed at 1484 DR, and the Adventurers League play starts in 1489 DR. This places it in line with the Phandelver, since Hotenow erupted in 1451 DR. Numbers taken from ...


2

A few quick suggestions: Keeping tabs on everything that happened This should be trivial. First, send out an email recap day of game. Second, spend literally five minutes where someone gives a "Last time we played" recap. Others should feel free to chime in, but this should still take no more than a few minutes. Remember - last session was short too, so ...


2

While this may or may not be a full answer, I wanted give some basis, especially since this is a wonderful yet unappreciated system: Any of the "create thing such that it always existed" or "remove thing from ever existing" effects in anima represent extremely powerful forces not commonly available to nearly anyone. I won't bank my reputation on this to say ...


2

In my experience, unless a journey will have something happen during it, don't waste time on it. Tell the players "This will take 10 days, is there anything particular you want to do while traveling?" and then react accordingly. If you want a chance of a random encounter, roll it at the start and throw it in, but don't make it go day-by-day if there is no ...


2

An influx of wealth into a city, combined with fancy new defenses and fortifications? Sounds like time for some militaristic political intrigue! Two things I think would take off in a town that is pumped up like that. Thieves A new influx of wealth means more people coming to take that wealth. Word can spread in a month about the tiny ship building ...


2

You have two dynamics intermingled in play here. Differing Play Styles The "problem" player (I'm not really sure he's the problem) likes heavy RP and has a narrativist playstyle (bases decisions on what would make the most dramatic story). About half of your question is just you/some of your fellow players having a different playstyle and therefore ...


2

Yes, you're over-complicating it. There's no real hard-and-fast rule about exactly how long an action takes in Fate (or what it involves), so there's nothing to stop you from saying that you spend your turn studying your opponent, then shout "I know that fighting style!" as part of that same action to all of your buddies because talking is a free action. ...



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