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1

Different flows of time can effectively happen in your D&D game, across a portal between two planes or across the surface of a Planar Shepard character's bubble. What really happens at the boundary is never specified by the rules. The most common interpretation you can find on forums is that a creature can either be at one side or the other, because ...


0

I've used a middle ground among these answers: I ballpark time when it's not critical, and when it is (in combat, or exploring a dungeon) I track time meticulously. Ballparking time is easy enough and doesn't require any paraphernalia. It feels somewhat awkward at first, but soon you get more skilled with estimates, communicating them clearly, and generally ...


3

Use time Wilderness is anything but static. As hours pass, the sun continues its course. Some creatures go to sleep, others awaken. The sounds change. The air chills or heats, wind picks up. Nightfall makes travel different (Will they stop to camp ? Continue with torches or lanterns and risk attracting beasts ?). Also consider fatigue. "Realistically", not ...


2

There is also some question of how the journey itself proceeds. Are the characters traveling to this dungeon for the first time? Are they journeying overland or is there a road to the destination? If there isn't an established route to the dungeon, then make the party actually navigate through the wilderness. Maybe they get lost. Maybe instead of walking up ...


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This may seem counterintuitive, but one thing I did that was both simple and efficient was to avoid getting too detailed about it when detail didn't really matter. If the scenario doesn't demand meticulous tracking of time, a ballpark figure will often work quite well and will save time and effort that you can put into more interesting parts of the game. ...


13

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


4

Travel time can be hard to make interesting. I'd say that you have two basic options: fill it with interim encounters or simply narrate the travel. Encounters on the road: the party could run a bunch into monsters like you mentioned. This is of course a valid option and a decent opportunity if you need filler combat, but remember that encounters don't ...


6

Counters are a really useful tool. You give each player a (for example) red counter per ration they have, or other limited resource they need to spend every set amount of time. The DM gets 23 black counters that are each 1 hour, 5 blue counters that are each 10 mins, 9 green counters that are 1 minute each, and so on. Then when time passes you move a counter ...


1

How I've always handled it: New player--you help them out. Experienced player--when it's their turn I expect an action or else a request for clarification of the situation. After answering a clarification I'll give them a little time to think. If they don't say what they're going to do in a few seconds they're delaying (including the change to the ...


2

I once had a similar issue, and I used an egg timer. It had the desired effect, and I was able to disguise it. I don't think the problem player even had a clue that s/he was the reason for the timer being inmplementd. I presented it to the players as a tool to make combat more realistic. Since each round was 6 seconds long in the system we were using, I ...



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