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4

Although I think KRyan's answer's correct that it's reasonable for the maneuver to be agreed upon by the table to work in a potentially unusual, it-can-sort-of-turn-back-time way—and I think that's valid, martial characters needing all the help they can get—, below is a harder-edged, rules-as-written way to read the maneuver in case you want an alternative. ...


5

So the distinction basically comes down to what is meant by attack here. Wall of blades may be merely referring to the attack roll, in which case you would have your last opportunity to activate wall of blades after learning the attack being made against you (#2 in the question). Or it might be referring to the attack as an action performed by the opponent, ...


6

Yes, it does. These are the touch attack rules: Some attacks disregard armor, including shields and natural armor. In these cases, the attacker makes a touch attack roll (either ranged or melee). A touch attack is still a kind of attack, since there is an attack roll. So it doesn't get around wall of blades the same way that, say, a fog cloud spell ...


5

You are still able to attack adjacent creatures. The rules that say you can't attack adjacent only appear for reach weapons: A reach weapon is a melee weapon that allows its wielder to strike at targets that aren’t adjacent to him or her [...] 10 feet away, but not a creature in an adjacent square The stance is not making your weapon a reach weapon, ...


4

Yes... but not much. The warblade recovery is very good, and the swordsage recovery is very bad, but with swordsage maneuvers readied, you may find yourself not needing to recover all that often. Combats in 3.5 tend to be rather short (in rounds), after all.


4

The relevant text is this: While you are in this stance, you gain a +10-foot enhancement bonus to your speed. If you move at least 10 feet during your turn, you gain a +2 dodge bonus to AC until the beginning of your next turn. So let's go through your questions: You get the AC as soon as you move 10 feet Let's say you wanted to move 20 feet, but ...


1

In any given round you are given one of three options: Full round action Move action and a standard action Two Move actions. You also get an unlimited* number of free actions, and a single swift or immediate action. Free action: You can perform one or more free actions while taking another action normally. However, there are reasonable limits on what ...


9

To recover you need to do both of the following: A swift action, and One of the following: Attempt a melee attack (any melee attack, such as the standard-action attack, part of a full-attack, even an attack of opportunity though there is a risk you won’t get one) Or spend a standard action to flourish So yes, you can make a full-attack as part of your ...


0

Oh! I vote you can because that little word "or" separating melee attack and standard action. But maybe not? "A full-round action consumes all your effort during a round. The only movement you can take during a full-round action is a 5-foot step before, during, or after the action. You can also perform free actions (see below). Some full-round actions do ...


12

No one knows. Iron Heart surge is easily the biggest question mark in an otherwise-stellar book, worded very confusingly and plagued by nonsensical customer service rulings (that imply, for example, that it could turn off the sun). The errata for Tome of Battle gets just three entries in before being overwritten by the errata to Complete Mage (seriously; it’...


0

I'm not really sure, so I don't expect that this will be the best answer but it seems like there's two ways to look at it. A round is approximately six seconds. Anything that lasts six seconds or longer is fair game. You could just limit it to anything measured in rounds, like you said. On this site I found an extended description including errata, but ...



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