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0

There are a whole set of different generators for a variety of different things available at http://megacosm.morgajel.net/. They're being added to at a fairly rapid rate it seems as well. The country, region and street generators might be useful for you in particular.


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HeroForge and SpellForge are excel based character editors. I strongly recommend them. They can be found at http://nzcomputers.net/heroforge/default35.asp


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I haven't used it for straight 3.x in quite some time, but PCGen is quite a fully-featured d20 system character builder. I use it mostly for Pathfinder these days, but I also used it for 3.x during my Living Greyhawk career. It is a free product, for both the good and the bad that comes with it - datafiles are built by volunteers, so are free, but may not be ...


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No tool like this exists for Rogue Trader... I spent about half an hour searching around on google, forums, and the official Rogue Trader site to see if there was anything approaching what you described and there is not. In fact the only tool of any kind I could find was for star system generation (and everything within) However, you shouldn't be the one ...


12

You've described the planet/civilisation generator at the heart of Stars Without Number almost exactly. You even have a "Special: Food Taboo" thing there beside the numbers, which is the kind of non-numeric information that it specialises in delivering. It's nominally a sci-fi game, but in a post-fall galaxy where anything from a medieval to high-tech ...


14

Use Chaotic Shiny's Civilisation Generator. Setting-agnostic: Yes. It covers a few date ranges from the past to the future, and is generically applicable enough. Scalable: Yes. As you take this smaller-scale, you may want to de-emphasize some generated details, ignore them, or treat them as properties of the larger civilisation this village belongs to. ...


4

You can make your own with a script (With, for example, python), since (I know this first hand) finding the exact program you are looking for can be really hard. I did this to generate NPCs and it worked great, althought it may be a bit more complicated depending on the detail level you are looking for. If you just want generic data like names, sizes, ...


0

I recently used Roll20 to run a game of Psi*Run, a game that uses index cards to create a location map as the players proceed through a desperate chase. Two of my players were local and three at a remote location. It was simple and easy to draw rectangles as cards and add some text on them. My memory of Microscope is fuzzy, but I don't think it required ...


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I'm currently developing an open-source platform-independent desktop suite to address my own needs in this area. You can check out the GitHub repository here. Right now it handles dice rolling and I'm currently working on the combat tracking. It tracks initiative, HP, position, and some statuses. It comes with a sample blank battle grid where each square is ...


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I've used a middle ground among these answers: I ballpark time when it's not critical, and when it is (in combat, or exploring a dungeon) I track time meticulously. Ballparking time is easy enough and doesn't require any paraphernalia. It feels somewhat awkward at first, but soon you get more skilled with estimates, communicating them clearly, and generally ...


5

You might look into using a Wiki. For the campaign that I've been developing, I have a Wiki that is separated as such: An area that describes the world, which anybody with access to the wiki can see An area that I use for development (where I keep notes on ideas for future adventures, and plans, etc.), which only I and specific other people helping me ...


3

Evernote is a good candidate for this. It's a cloud based note storage tool, handling text (with tagging and some formatting), images, and some other types of document attachments. It's got clients for pretty much every major platform (including phones and tablets), and a web interface. Notebooks can be shared between users. The free version allows ...


1

Roll20 has a feature allowing to create notes (even with images) and give access to them to the players you choose to. Of course, if you're already using a different virtual tabletop this is way less useful. I'm not familiar with every IRC interface out there but I know at least some have the option of creating private chats (Private Message). You could ...


4

This may seem counterintuitive, but one thing I did that was both simple and efficient was to avoid getting too detailed about it when detail didn't really matter. If the scenario doesn't demand meticulous tracking of time, a ballpark figure will often work quite well and will save time and effort that you can put into more interesting parts of the game. ...


1

fakenamegenerator.com not only generates names from real-world cultures, but also some fantasy cultures like hobbit and klingon. E.g., generate a russian woman's name: http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/?gen=female&n=ru When I tried it, this returned "Renata Cherkasova." Next, get a male hobbit's name: ...


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Counters are a really useful tool. You give each player a (for example) red counter per ration they have, or other limited resource they need to spend every set amount of time. The DM gets 23 black counters that are each 1 hour, 5 blue counters that are each 10 mins, 9 green counters that are 1 minute each, and so on. Then when time passes you move a counter ...


1

Could be Vassal (http://www.vassalengine.org). It's possible to 'build' games and skin them on Vassal, which is an online games engine. From their website: Vassal is a game engine for building and playing online adaptations of board games and card games. Play live on the Internet or by email. Vassal runs on all platforms, and is free, open-source ...


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You may be thinking of Fantasy Grounds, which does allow both players and GMs to move characters on the map. Another one to keep your eye on is Realm Works, which is currently in beta.



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