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3

Skype allows multiple streams; I use it to tutor my brother, who lives far from me, and he shares both his screen (so I can see what he's working on) and his webcam (so I can see his face). Recently, they added multiple video chat, but I've never used it with the screen-sharing function so I'm not 100% sure it will allow both multiple recipients and two ...


0

A simple DIY solution might be to just stream your desktop, but also run a program that displays your webcam in a window on your desktop. Then you can toggle between windows as needed, or possibly even find a way to pin the webcam view on top of the other windows. Edit: I don't know what OS you're using, and you can Google as easily as I can, but a quick ...


1

You can also look at zoom (zoom.com) but it does cost a little money. It works fairly nicely as I use it for business. Although I rarely use the chat typing functionality and opt for the microphone. It does have one however.


8

Google hangouts. Invite yourself twice, mute one instance. When I've presented at conferences, remotely, I've driven two instances of google hangouts in exactly this way. So long as you've got one of the instances' audio completely cut out (I recommend the screenshare), and enough bandwidth to push both, you're just fine. You have to use multiple google ...


5

My group uses a private Google+ community to organise the games, and G+ alongside Roll20 to play the games. We play entirely online on a weekly basis, mainly because we're all about the same age and have small children and families, so it's difficult to get together for a face to face game. For D&D 5th Ed you're pretty spoiled for choice, but when it ...


3

I am currently playing a 5th edition game as DM but with only 2 players - a long-time D&D associate and my 12 year old son who is new to the hobby. Even though he lives in the same house as me, he remotes in from a different room because the remote participant kept getting cross-talk from our mikes if we were in the same room. We are using roll20.net ...


1

I once had a game for DnD 3.5 that was entirely remote - it was run in Facebook comments. Several things the DM did to manage the situation: Each situation was a new post. When a new situation arose (new area, meeting a new NPC, start/end of a conflict) a new post was posted. The DM managed all the rolls. To avoid player cheating, the DM was the one that ...


0

I've always used Google Sheets. It's helpful to have it autocalculate any stats possible, and you can create a shared folder in google drive so that the DM can have access to all of the players Character sheets, Backstory, Images, and anything else added to the folder.


1

Imarvin has a spell database in csv format. It's been a while, but I used it for a similar spread sheet. You'll need to sort by sourcebook, class and level, then just copy what you want into a new file, or delete what you don't want, but shouldn't take but a couple of minutes.


0

For lovers of Scrivener, there's also the similar and very flexible Gingko App that I've used for my dialog maps. It's extremely versatile, and easy to use once you get the hang of it. You can also use it for reference data, character sheets, designing campaigns, writing backstories, etc... all in the same document.


1

Many years ago, I bought a pad of 1" hex paper from a gaming store. I have no idea who made it but I'm sure a web search can find a supplier. For example, https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1730454032/a4-numbered-hex-pad?ref=nav_search, http://tomeoftreasures.com/tot_nontsr/armory/hex_graph_paper.htm. I also had access to a CAD program, where I made my ...


2

I used an online graph paper maker and purchased a large acrylic sheet from a hardware store (looked for a damaged one for a discount). The acrylic sheet works great with dry-erase markers. The online graph paper maker includes grids, hexes, different weights of lines, etc. Basically, everything you could possibly need. The acrylic sheet also works great ...


4

Cut a bigger battlemat down to size A straightforward solution would be to buy a standard battle grid, like this one from paizo, and cut it into smaller pieces using sturdy household scissors, x-acto or carpet cutter knives. The main benefit is that this works exactly like the big one with regards to what pen you can use or how to erase it. The paizo ...


4

Dry erase markers work very well on clear acetate or poly page protectors. Print your grid, slip it into the page protector sleeve, and you're ready to map and erase. The protectors eventually wear out, but you'll get much more use for your dollar than any commercial whiteboard-like grid you're likely to find. An alternative that I used to use (long ago) ...


4

It is not possible for GM's to add more cells to the Stats tab, regardless of whether it is a Character, Event, Group, Place or Item. Though you'd prefer not to use the description for stats, many GM's do exactly that, as in the following example: Carrinac in the Gyristan Campaign. To make it look nicer, descriptions on Scabard can take a limited set of ...



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