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Checking for traps takes time. Generally, most DMs set up scenarios where time taken doesn't matter, and just say the end of the day is reached after 4 encounters. Don't do this. What are the enemies doing in the hours that this rogue spends looking for traps? Setting an ambush, learning the parties weaknesses and preparing accordingly, summoning ...


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If you have a player who obsessively and thoroughly checks every square they pass for traps or secret doors, the character is going to be spending an incredible amount of game time searching. The party will take an entire day just to travel a single kilometer. If you are ignoring the passing of time, there is no downside to this behavior (from the player's ...


2

First and foremost, you should have a talk with this player. Mention to him that his constant checking for traps is becoming a major time drag on the campaign, and ask him to do it a bit less often, or only when prompted, so that the game won't be bogged down by constant trap-checking. If need be, suggest that he only needs to check for traps if you ...


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Setting aside the utility of relegating most passive searching to passive perception and allowing active searching to find a trap that you already have evidence for, most traps and hazards in 4e really don't care about being detected. (This answer is inspired by a now defunct blog post about applying super meat boy to D&D traps (look at the second ...


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Checking for traps in combat does cost action economy PERCEIVE SOMETHING Make a Perception check to perceive something, such as a hidden door, a concealed object, a group of creatures talking, or a monster’s tracks. Action: Minor action. No action is required when the DM is using a creature’s passive Perception. Carefully searching an area (the ...


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If he is a rouge, he must and should check for traps (unless for some reason someone else built to find traps). If you are having a problem with the frequency that he does it, perhaps talk with the GM about the problem. One big thing that I normally do when I run a game is that I only do "one" perception check per room. That can be overridden (circumstances ...


6

First Things First While it might be hilarious to poison the PCs to death and reincarnate them as fuzzy animals, I urge against it. In my experience, such events are seldom as funny at the table as they were when imagined. I suggest instead a supernatural poison (perhaps inhaled) that as its damage inflicts an effect like baleful polymorph. This is much ...


19

Don't make it a trap. Instead, have a bejewelled chamber with a button on the inside. "Do not press." the button reads. Let their curiosity do the rest. Make a prop of the button on the table, and have it be invitingly easy to press. Beyond that, this "hilarious" trap seems mostly tedious. The character's reward for not treating every step like it has ...



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