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47

Travel Is Awesome! Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity but in doing it. ~Don Williams, Jr. Far from being something to "skip over," wilderness travel is an interesting part of a story and forms a large part of many narratives, from Lord of the Rings to Star Trek. From the 1e Wilderness Survival Guide to ...


30

Mounts have several advantages and several disadvantages, especially for adventurers. Here's one Texan's perspective on going horsed vs not. Advantages Ability to carry a lot more grub/gear/loot than you can yourself Keeps you from getting tuckered out from long marches (the horses may get fatigued, but you're still semi-fresh for a fight) Faster ...


21

Part of the problem is that the standard conception of an adventurer is somewhat unrealistic in and of itself. An independent group of characters who possesses a great deal of material wealth and specialized equipment yet travels so widely that they seldom cross the same patch of ground twice is extremely rare in realistic settings. With that said, there ...


18

Make the time spent matter. Players can afford to send their characters trekking through the woods because in most games the PCs are in a vacuum. By that I mean that the world only moves when the players are looking at it. If the PCs are sent into a dungeon, nothing happens in town until the PCs return. Don't do that. Turn time into a commodity. If ...


17

Extract the first few plot points that are going to take place at the destination and put them on the road. This strategy also helps you be less railroad-y because the players are out in the open and have more choices about where to go instead of being locked into a city/dungeon/what-have-you.


13

Unless you are only going a short distance riding is far preferable to walking unless one of the following circumstances is present. You require some amount of stealth or sneakiness for the duration of the journey. Horses are loud, carts are louder. The entire trip is through an uncharted or very dense forest that would make mounted transportation ...


13

Description, description, description. Give them a thirty second to three minute description of the travels. Skip the rolls (unless you want one to determine how long it took, etc) and just talk through it. It takes almost no time, but gives the players the impression time has passed.


12

Outsourcing. Specifically, outsourcing to the players. Ask them to tell you about 1 month's worth of misadventure that happens while they're on the road. Bonus points if you take notes and reincorporate their material into the game later on.


12

Characters should prefer their own 2 feet to horses/beasts of burden when they will be traveling in either mountainous terrain, jungles, or deserts. Mountains are too steep and rocky for the horses to be able to get sure footing, and precipitous drops on footpaths can sometimes give you the choice of backing up a horse, or risk the horse losing their ...


10

In the 13th century, "..an average day's journey on horseback was about 30 to 40 miles, although it varied widely, depending on circumstance. A messenger on horseback, without riding at night, could cover 40 to 50 miles a day and about half as much on foot. In an emergency, given a good horse and a good road (which was rare), and no load, he could make 15 ...


10

Runner's Companion: “Travel and Smuggling” (pp. 28–33) has an overview of the subject but no hard numbers. It discusses common transportation methods, techniques, and challenges that players are likely to face. The Unfriendly Skies and Deadly Waves mini-supplements are full of vehicle stats, which may come in handy for travel adventures. Spy Games: ...


9

A variety of options present themselves to me: Require the players to deal with the logistics of the trip. For instance, tracking food, water, and other supplies. Have a variety of mini adventures and side quests along the way. Instead of fantasy monsters this could be whole villages that dot the path. Remember that inns and small hamlets historically ...


9

Only Gentry and Nobles Ride Horses!!! The primary reason PC's would walk instead of ride would be that they are not nobles nor elves. In most realistic settings, a horse is a status symbol of the gentry and nobility. In many real world timeframes, a non-noble on horse was subject to harsh, sometimes even capital, punishments. As in, many lashes or even ...


8

As always, late to the party. First off, you have already answered the first question, which is that you wish to keep a somewhat realistic atmosphere. That also should answer the question if your group enjoys the logistics puzzles or not. (If you say no, than you have a completely different issue). Secondly, There are reasons some game rules include ...


7

Based on a comment you made to another answer... You asked what is overburdening us so much. In GURPS, carrying > your basic lift takes you into the first weight penalty (slightly lower movement and dodge). Basic lift is (ST*ST)/5. This is 20lbs for a normal character, so if you are wearing more than your equipment, you are at a move/dodge penalty. ...


7

If there's no plot element tied to the travel, if it's unimportant, just fast forward. They're there. Tell them how much time has passed. If you want an element of chance, have them make a check. On success, they're there. On failure, add a complication: the weather went bad, they lost their pack animals, bandits are trying to rob them, there's a mob of ...


6

The terrain travelled will dictate the top speed and not necessary the means of transport. I know we are talking about fantasy with superb magically paved roads that neither flood nor need repairs. But if you are interested in historical travel, then you could take more than a day to do ten miles -- on foot. Horses would be unavailable due to the ...


6

Any time the terrain you have to cover is not condusive to riding. (Risk of falls, damage to the mount, low ceilings, etc) Any time you have to sqeeze through a tight space (or at least one that would be tight for your mount). Any time you are going to be traveling through an area that your mount is liable to attract attention that your party will not on ...


6

Legends of Anglerre has a really good system for time in travel. It's set up as a sort-of 'meta character' that the GM places certain obstacles in the party's way. Dice are rolled, skills are checked and any damage that may be taken (like from a rock slide) is distributed randomly or based on the current in-game logic (the first character in the group ...


5

Circumstances that would make mounted travel less desirable than travel on foot. A disease of the horses. (Introduce it well before the party sets out on the adventure to avoid the feel of "direct obstruction", make it affect other animals too: show sick pigs first, for example, then make horses an available but highly risky option. In case your party has ...


5

On Foot Budget for 2 miles per hour, with an extra hour per 1000 foot elevation climb. This is assuming you can walk on the slope. If you are only carrying yourself (and maybe a water bottle), figure on 3 mph. Figure you have about 8-10 hours of walking a day, will give you 15-20 miles depending on conditions (mud, hills, extreme heat/cold will slow you ...


5

"Were there other commonly used forms of travel by river?" Yes, there were: towpaths, (timber) rafting, rowing, and warping (for example on river barges: people with a small boat rowed ahead and farther away from the big ship sank an anchor. Now the team on the big ship adducted themselves and the great boat with the rope (connected to the anchor), pulled ...


4

Several things right off the top of my head: If your system allows magical items then a magic storage location (bag of holding in D&D) can provide you with all of the storage you need at a minimal carry weight. If the location you are traveling through is not desert then you should be able to forage for food and water. This will lessen the amount of ...


4

Is it fun for the PCs to micromanage all their possessions? No? Then just don't deal with it, but say no if the players are being unreasonable with what they're bringing with them.


4

Depending on your degree of verisimilitude, the answer could be "always." In Aurthurian fantasy, for example, knights travelled with squires and pages and pack horses, etc. Although the knight might ride a riding horse at walking speed, the whole cavalcade usually went at a walking pace.


4

I have to assume that you're talking about a major river (Rhine or Thames up to London). Anything smaller is just going to be too twisting and shallow to be practicable for trading. That simplifies it, because current is fairly negligible, assuming the captain/pilot has enough local knowledge and is not constrained by draught (I've tried it). Wind ...


4

Short of giving out some kind of high level magic as a deus ex machina, there are no in-game options common in Golarion canon - many adventure paths (esp. Jade Regent) are oriented around long treks to get to places. You could let them steal a party-sized flying carpet or get some teleport device (though even teleport, RAW, won't take you all the way to Tian ...


4

History One trick to making things feel epic is to highlight the history of the place as they travel. This is pretty much one of the big things Tolkien loved to do - he'd talk about some mountains, what they were named, what they were named before that, who lived there, who lived there before that, which ancient spirit shaped them, etc. Of course, this ...


3

I am not a great outdoorsman, but I try, every spring and summer, to get a couple of hikes out with my friends. Sometimes it's a day trip. Sometimes we pack sleeping bags and overnight it somewhere. See some flora, some fauna. What strikes me, every time we do this, is that what is, for me, an enjoyable break from everyday life is, for adventurers, 90% of ...


3

Horses are faster than humans only at medium distances. Over both short (sprint) and long (multi-day) distances, humans tend to be faster, even on even ground like a good road. Horses are not cars. On uneven ground, humans are definitely faster than horses, over almost any distance. Also, horses need feeding. And foraging can take most of the day. Grass ...



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