Hot answers tagged

23

Yes, Absolutely. In any circumstance where you're trying to shoo in a sense of urgency and you need to be at the castle to rescue the princess as soon as possible, and you're sure that the princess is acutally at said castle after performing divinations or using your information and contacts to confirm her location, fast forwarding keeps the emotions at the ...


19

According to the traditional summoner's eidolon class feature, this isn't a problem unless the GM says it is... The traditional Pathfinder summoner's eidolon class feature says that A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons ...


10

You're going to have to work it out with your GM. The only place that I'm aware of in the Pathfinder rules that ever mentions time travel on a scale greater than rounds is the Scepter of Ages that you mentioned, and I only know about that because of your post. Time travel isn't really a thing that's standard to PF, and so the rules, and how precisely time ...


8

Don't forget that the average person in your game setting most likely doesn't have any access to magical travel -- just as the existence of people who can afford to charter a 737 for their vacation doesn't remove the need for me to drive when I travel. Horses, wagons, and roads won't vanish just because a few wizards can travel with a poof. Wizards are ...


7

I know it isn't the first answer you're looking for, but this link is a free huge hi-res map of the Sword Coast direct from WotC with a map scale. It looks like it would be pretty easy to figure out the distances on that map, using that scale. For example, I figure the journey from Waterdeep to Triboar, based on this map, is about 300 miles.


6

This largely depends on both you and your group. Do they want a lot of random encounters? Would they prefer to just play the module out? Do you want to throw things in the mix to interfere? Hoard of the Dragon Queen, and the Rise of Tiamat, both allow for a lot of flexibility. In addition, they use milestone levels instead of XP based levels. So encounters ...


5

Passing time is a useful technique. Time should always be passed when no one is interested in a given period of time and no result of the time period will matter later. Time should not be passed if anyone is interested in the events of the time period (usually because they want to act in it) nor should it be passed if any player's understanding of what is ...


4

I do this all the time in my campaigns. I play with my group during the school year since we are in college. So running my game is more of a Cinematic feel. If they need to travel 200 miles from one town to the outskirts of where the adventure truly lies, I deem it unnecessary to "waste" our limited game time on random bandit attacks on the road. That said, ...


3

Distance is one of the factors into determining the Pathfinder obstacle, although it is abstracted. Pathfinder Factors Destination: Nearby, a short journey, a long journey, remote or isolated The GM should choose which of these seems most relevant. There's no explicit speed listed or distances involved. The map doesn't even have a scale. Refer to ...


3

You should definitely check out http://orbis.stanford.edu/ You can figure travel speeds between real roman places, and come up with an analogue in your world, or just use their travel speeds. And they have a whole section on river travel speeds in the "Building" tab on the introductory popup page. In the "civilian" mode, the most common downriver ...


3

I'm going to answer this with a somewhat unhelpful "It depends." My answer isn't intentionally unhelpful; it's just that the nature of role-playing games makes answering your question difficult. Let me 'splain... With my group, I'd never force them to go from location to location in a specific order. My players expect that they actually have a choice in ...


3

Use the spell animate dead to create a custom ride The spell animate dead creates a skeleton or—even better if it can be managed—a variant fast zombie, which no longer possesses the special ability staggered. When one can do this, then it's a matter of picking what creature to animate. As the only limits are Hit Dice and that the intact corpse be that of a ...


3

Apparently, giant spiders and beetles are used by Duergar as mounts See Pathfinder Wiki which makes perfect sense. Drow would seem to use Riding Geckos or Dire Bats See PRD


2

I do stuff like this for things like retreading through cleared dungeon floors, but for stuff like exploring the dungeon itself it's kind of expected that you at least give them the ability to search through the map and try out all the different paths themselves- if you just strip away the map and skip right into the necessary encounters one after another ...


2

In my experience, unless a journey will have something happen during it, don't waste time on it. Tell the players "This will take 10 days, is there anything particular you want to do while traveling?" and then react accordingly. If you want a chance of a random encounter, roll it at the start and throw it in, but don't make it go day-by-day if there is no ...


2

My solution for this problem is to not run campaigns with high-level characters in them (either PC or NPC). I plan for my plot to end when the characters hit level 9, and there are no level-9 NPCs, so all those spells you mention are simply not available. There are still a few low-level travel spells, such as communal mount which summons fresh horses for ...


1

Yes. Just tell them the story about what happens, taking their character's normal behaviour into account, and only play the interesting parts. Better is to do the same but allow them input and ask for clarification as you tell them and just decide what the results of their actions are to fit the story.



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