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65

I see two primary ways to approach this, depending on the travel. (TL;DR at the end) Travelling through civilized lands From your description, it seems like your players (who are, considering you are playing D&D4e, are basically powerful heroes) are travelling between two cities in a civilized nation. In this case, I'm not even sure if I'd run any kind ...


20

Yes, Absolutely. In any circumstance where you're trying to shoo in a sense of urgency and you need to be at the castle to rescue the princess as soon as possible, and you're sure that the princess is acutally at said castle after performing divinations or using your information and contacts to confirm her location, fast forwarding keeps the emotions at the ...


19

According to the traditional summoner's eidolon class feature, this isn't a problem unless the GM says it is... The traditional Pathfinder summoner's eidolon class feature says that A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons ...


10

You're going to have to work it out with your GM. The only place that I'm aware of in the Pathfinder rules that ever mentions time travel on a scale greater than rounds is the Scepter of Ages that you mentioned, and I only know about that because of your post. Time travel isn't really a thing that's standard to PF, and so the rules, and how precisely time ...


10

TL;DR: Skip random encounters, make encounters during travel meaningful for the story. Travel, as any other part of game you play out, should have a purpose. Actually, it should have several purposes: Involve the players, let the characters shine, move the story forward, add to the world. If all you'd do with traveling is get to a new place where the ...


6

This largely depends on both you and your group. Do they want a lot of random encounters? Would they prefer to just play the module out? Do you want to throw things in the mix to interfere? Hoard of the Dragon Queen, and the Rise of Tiamat, both allow for a lot of flexibility. In addition, they use milestone levels instead of XP based levels. So encounters ...


5

Passing time is a useful technique. Time should always be passed when no one is interested in a given period of time and no result of the time period will matter later. Time should not be passed if anyone is interested in the events of the time period (usually because they want to act in it) nor should it be passed if any player's understanding of what is ...


3

You should definitely check out http://orbis.stanford.edu/ You can figure travel speeds between real roman places, and come up with an analogue in your world, or just use their travel speeds. And they have a whole section on river travel speeds in the "Building" tab on the introductory popup page. In the "civilian" mode, the most common downriver ...


3

Another idea that can sometimes apply, but perhaps not in this case, is to set up a tight deadline. If your party has only 16 days to get from Alpha to Beta before something happens (obviously not "you lose" but rather "things get more interesting"), then you could show them on the map that the safe route from city to city along patrolled roads takes 20. ...


3

Use the spell animate dead to create a custom ride The spell animate dead creates a skeleton or—even better if it can be managed—a variant fast zombie, which no longer possesses the special ability staggered. When one can do this, then it's a matter of picking what creature to animate. As the only limits are Hit Dice and that the intact corpse be that of a ...


3

Apparently, giant spiders and beetles are used by Duergar as mounts See Pathfinder Wiki which makes perfect sense. Drow would seem to use Riding Geckos or Dire Bats See PRD


3

I do this all the time in my campaigns. I play with my group during the school year since we are in college. So running my game is more of a Cinematic feel. If they need to travel 200 miles from one town to the outskirts of where the adventure truly lies, I deem it unnecessary to "waste" our limited game time on random bandit attacks on the road. That said, ...


2

In my experience, unless a journey will have something happen during it, don't waste time on it. Tell the players "This will take 10 days, is there anything particular you want to do while traveling?" and then react accordingly. If you want a chance of a random encounter, roll it at the start and throw it in, but don't make it go day-by-day if there is no ...


2

I do stuff like this for things like retreading through cleared dungeon floors, but for stuff like exploring the dungeon itself it's kind of expected that you at least give them the ability to search through the map and try out all the different paths themselves- if you just strip away the map and skip right into the necessary encounters one after another ...


2

There's a couple of dials you can turn that create different experiences for travel. "Are we sick of each other yet?" First, it's worth noting whether this is something your group even wants in their game at all. Most of us like to play action-adventure RPGs and don't particularly care to endure mundane drama as part of our escapism. Talk to your group ...


1

What about turning travel time into a puzzle or a "game-within-a-game" to add a little danger and fun to the journey? The hallmark of a fun game is problem solving and having to make difficult decisions. Without refering to specific landmarks that lie between Neverwinter and Cormyr (I don't have a map of Faerun handy), here are a few examples: Min/max ...



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