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63

I see two primary ways to approach this, depending on the travel. (TL;DR at the end) Travelling through civilized lands From your description, it seems like your players (who are, considering you are playing D&D4e, are basically powerful heroes) are travelling between two cities in a civilized nation. In this case, I'm not even sure if I'd run any kind ...


9

TL;DR: Skip random encounters, make encounters during travel meaningful for the story. Travel, as any other part of game you play out, should have a purpose. Actually, it should have several purposes: Involve the players, let the characters shine, move the story forward, add to the world. If all you'd do with traveling is get to a new place where the ...


4

History One trick to making things feel epic is to highlight the history of the place as they travel. This is pretty much one of the big things Tolkien loved to do - he'd talk about some mountains, what they were named, what they were named before that, who lived there, who lived there before that, which ancient spirit shaped them, etc. Of course, this ...


3

Another idea that can sometimes apply, but perhaps not in this case, is to set up a tight deadline. If your party has only 16 days to get from Alpha to Beta before something happens (obviously not "you lose" but rather "things get more interesting"), then you could show them on the map that the safe route from city to city along patrolled roads takes 20. ...


3

Use the spell animate dead to create a custom ride The spell animate dead creates a skeleton or—even better if it can be managed—a variant fast zombie, which no longer possesses the special ability staggered. When one can do this, then it's a matter of picking what creature to animate. As the only limits are Hit Dice and that the intact corpse be that of a ...


3

Apparently, giant spiders and beetles are used by Duergar as mounts See Pathfinder Wiki which makes perfect sense. Drow would seem to use Riding Geckos or Dire Bats See PRD


3

You should definitely check out http://orbis.stanford.edu/ You can figure travel speeds between real roman places, and come up with an analogue in your world, or just use their travel speeds. And they have a whole section on river travel speeds in the "Building" tab on the introductory popup page. In the "civilian" mode, the most common downriver ...


2

I think you have several options available to you to make travel feel "Epic" Core Rulebook Ill start with the basic rules from the core rulebook. You can use weather and terrain variants to make travel VERY interesting. Environment. This gives you all sorts of weather and terrain based fun, like getting lost in the woods, to sandstorms and quick sand. ...


2

There's a couple of dials you can turn that create different experiences for travel. "Are we sick of each other yet?" First, it's worth noting whether this is something your group even wants in their game at all. Most of us like to play action-adventure RPGs and don't particularly care to endure mundane drama as part of our escapism. Talk to your group ...


1

What about turning travel time into a puzzle or a "game-within-a-game" to add a little danger and fun to the journey? The hallmark of a fun game is problem solving and having to make difficult decisions. Without refering to specific landmarks that lie between Neverwinter and Cormyr (I don't have a map of Faerun handy), here are a few examples: Min/max ...


1

One way to make travel feel truly epic, without resorting to mechanics, is to include epic scenery. For starters, create an awesome color map of the lands the party will be traveling through. There are several mapmaking tools available for free. Use visual references - share color pics of the vistas the party will see as they travel through your world. ...



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