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60

Gold buys people Without a readily available source of high-end useful items, you can purchase large quantities of low-end things. For example, a hundred swords, a hundred kits of armor, a thousand man-years in soldier's wages and a dozen wagons of supplies can achieve a variety of things that a squad of powerful murderhobos can't. A supply of gold can ...


53

This is one of those "Let me tell you a story about how things were pre-third edition" questions. In every D&D edition from the 1970s to the year 2000, you couldn't buy magic items to spec. But you still got gold. We didn't complain about it and found it quite useful. In most of real world history, you couldn't buy magic items. Yet still gold/money is ...


47

Take a lesson from real-life windfalls: Investment First - don't panic! This happens all the time: http://www.fudco.com/chip/lessons.html (read from "You can't trust anyone".) Give them something to invest in - let them make a down payment on a keep or an airship - something that will really pay off for them in the future. The Paladin/Cleric should give ...


35

They can, sure. But the BD&D rules are quite explicit that they typically have no value. In general, Weapon and armor used by monsters are rarely in good enough condition to sell (BD&D p 42). So they can collect them, they can even use them, but no, merchants won't buy them unless they are particularly pristine.


31

You can have several tricks to get around this, I've used similar methods with fantasy and cyberpunk games. Security Weapons are keycoded, or Palmprinting - this stops anyone but a certain person using it. Yes you can bypass it, but it's either difficult or very pricey. Limited uses Yes, you've got a melta gun - but getting ammo/powerpacks for it is ...


29

As noted, this is a player decision rather than a GM one. However, here is the system that one of my groups used to good effect in the past: Loot is pooled until the end of the night or adventure (although particularly powerful upgrades may be lent out on a temporary basis). Calculate the total sell value of the pool of items (that is, how much the players ...


29

They don't have to be no treasure There's ways to do things like this without inexplicably giving the monsters wealth. Here's a few: Location, Location, Location In the module Ruins of Myth Drannor for 3.0 there's a small dungeon sequence in which almost none of the enemies have treasure. Thankfully, the dungeon itself is full of valuables! Consider ...


29

"There's no magic item economy" does not equal "Magic items are never bought and sold". It's just that there's no set market for them, they're too rare for that. If a character puts word out that he's looking for a particular item, someone might manage to turn it up for the right price. Barring that, commissioning someone to create the item might be ...


24

The biggest difference between fantasy and sci-fi notions of value is that: ideas have value Therefore, besides the standard stuff players receive, they can also discover what amounts to IP. One of the oddest forms of IP is actually Real Estate, as it's a purely symbolic agreement that X owns area Y, even though X may not sit on Y with guns. (Note how this ...


24

GM guides have long advocated solutions like bandits, tax collectors, and runaway inflation, but they rarely work out well in practice. Partly that's because those solutions have unintended consequences like vigilanteism, tax evasion, and bookkeeping headaches. The bigger problem is that players are sensitive to loss, and they react very poorly to losses ...


24

You can make this an "evolving" item, that only reveals its full power over time as the character becomes more attuned to it and puts effort into discovering more of its potential. That means you can stat it up as a regular 2-to-4th level magic item, and mention that the character can sense greater potential that's locked away. As a bonus, you can "evolve" ...


23

I once had a Shadowrun group who hit a truck transporting gold, and they walked away with something like two million nuyen (each) in a campaign where that was more than they had combined through character creation and their careers. It was somewhat of a mess, but it counteracted itself nicely, because I didn't just let them spend it on anything they could ...


21

You already let them get the item. Give them the item. Give them the full paragon tier level item. One level 15ish item at +3 (if you are playing DnD 4e) won't significantly destabilize the game. Don't forget to account for the cost of this item in the expected treasure for the party, as well. As Scott points out in the comments above, you should not be ...


21

You say: Once you've got the top level mundane gear and a stockpile of potions (which won't take long), doesn't gold become sort of worthless? equally, in a 3rd edition setting: Once you've got the top level wands, magic armor, vorpal swords and a stockpile of wondrous items (which won't take long), doesn't gold become sort of worthless? or to ...


19

This is clearly something the master has no decision whatsoever. The characters need to find an agreement on that. Let them fight. Don't get involved until you see Coke bottles flying around.


19

Choose whatever looks appropriate, plus a few flavourful items for theme, from TreantMonk's Guide, and Bunko's Bargain Basement. Choose flavourful items that will prove to be macguffins for your campaign. He explores all the magic items someone would have. An 18th level wizard will have 3 categories of items. "Junk I collected," "Stuff that's applicable to ...


17

Most people don't keep piles of gold under their beds, especially when they're as wealthy as a Lvl 18 character. Furthermore, wealth doesn't need to mean gold pieces either, but can be tied up in all kinds of assets. Finally, the wizard is evil. That gives us a lot to work with. Here are a few suggestions: The money is safely tucked away in investments. ...


17

Yes, yes it will. I do have experience with BFRPG. It's a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some nice mechanical bits from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. (I have experience with that too.) Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast: The ...


17

First off, since the question is tagged rogue-trader, I'll reiterate that the PCs are already able to get their hands on the best gear out there anyhow. "You're the owners and command staff of a 5km warpship with access to resources in excess of some worlds' annual gross planetary production" will get you pretty far. As in, if you want to buy a melta gun, ...


16

The most straightforward answer I can give you is: have them gain less treasure during the next encounters, until you reach the intended balance. In games where XP and money (or their equivalents) are independent, it's fairly easy. The PCs are now over-equipped, so they could also be able to handle some higher level fights for bigger XP awards. While ...


16

Turn the gold from asset to liability. Do not let them spend it in the first place. Perhaps they stay for a few more weeks in the dungeon/desert/swamp. And carrying the gold will be such a huge burden, especially if you have to choose between carrying your food and water rations or the gold. So perhaps they decide to hide it somewhere, to be collected later ...


15

There are a few types of hard to price treasures. Often, these are more story related and where the party is in the story is what places the value on the treasure. Example 1: A boon. Someone owes the party a favor. Maybe this person doesn't have much $$$ but has skills, knowledge or the ability to get knowledge that PCs might want down the line. Like he ...


15

I just watched someone buy a painting for $3,500,000. It doesn't come to life, it doesn't tell the future, it doesn't even age while they stay young. They primarily bought it to annoy someone else that wanted it, as far as I could see. What you're having is a failure to roleplay. The players are not imagining what they would do in the characters' place. ...


14

I notice that you didn't tag this question with a D&D tag, so I'm going to add an answer that doesn't assume D&D party dynamics. If both players want their characters to get a particular piece of loot, awesome! They have their characters in a conflict, which is what makes stories interesting. Run with it. In this case, I would turn it over to the ...


14

Any economist will tell you that a lot of factors can control the market price of an item. Here're a few that are easily applied to treasure: 1) Artistic merit An elegantly shaped leaf blade, inlaid with fine etching in an ancient script, the scabbard carefully wrapped in red silk? Or a straight, boring but functional, enchanted longsword? The latter ...


14

It sounds like you're asking two questions here: first, what items can the PCs pick up from enemies, and second, what properties do those items retain from enemies' stat blocks? 1) What items can PCs pick up? In theory, everything the enemy is listed as carrying. In reality, as Lucas says in his answer, picking up everything quickly becomes hugely ...


13

I would call it at a 100 gems per pound unless you specifically state is a certain size (like the eyes of the Player Handbook Idol). Gems are weighed in carats and the problem is that the value per carat varies between gem types. Harnmaster is the only Fantasy RPG I know of that gives that information. Even armed with such information I feel it strays over ...


13

My group has just simply (for the sake of simplicity) just reduced whatever objects we find that have value to their gold value. This reduces book keeping and simplifies wealth in 4e. However, if you want to pedantic, or show that an item is far more significant than a run of the mill gem stone there are skills in 4e that can be used for appraisal. In the ...


13

I'm a bit surprised that nobody provided the ways gold can be spent in the players handbook, so maybe I'm missing something however. The biggest expenses after you purchase your armor and weapons in the 5e player handbook is "Downtime Activities" and "Services". There are two major expenses which while it looks like they may not require much gold, ...


12

DMG2 has a good suggestion intended for DMs wanting to run a low-magic game that I have adopted to help my problems with the treasure parcel system. Basically, you incorporate the average bonuses all those magic items provide into the character advancement. If you start with this, you take away the problem of players NEEDING x number of magic items to be ...



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