Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

43

Take a lesson from real-life windfalls: Investment First - don't panic! This happens all the time: http://www.fudco.com/chip/lessons.html (read from "You can't trust anyone".) Give them something to invest in - let them make a down payment on a keep or an airship - something that will really pay off for them in the future. The Paladin/Cleric should give ...


29

They don't have to be no treasure There's ways to do things like this without inexplicably giving the monsters wealth. Here's a few: Location, Location, Location In the module Ruins of Myth Drannor for 3.0 there's a small dungeon sequence in which almost none of the enemies have treasure. Thankfully, the dungeon itself is full of valuables! Consider ...


24

You can make this an "evolving" item, that only reveals its full power over time as the character becomes more attuned to it and puts effort into discovering more of its potential. That means you can stat it up as a regular 2-to-4th level magic item, and mention that the character can sense greater potential that's locked away. As a bonus, you can "evolve" ...


22

GM guides have long advocated solutions like bandits, tax collectors, and runaway inflation, but they rarely work out well in practice. Partly that's because those solutions have unintended consequences like vigilanteism, tax evasion, and bookkeeping headaches. The bigger problem is that players are sensitive to loss, and they react very poorly to losses ...


21

You already let them get the item. Give them the item. Give them the full paragon tier level item. One level 15ish item at +3 (if you are playing DnD 4e) won't significantly destabilize the game. Don't forget to account for the cost of this item in the expected treasure for the party, as well. As Scott points out in the comments above, you should not be ...


19

Choose whatever looks appropriate, plus a few flavourful items for theme, from TreantMonk's Guide, and Bunko's Bargain Basement. Choose flavourful items that will prove to be macguffins for your campaign. He explores all the magic items someone would have. An 18th level wizard will have 3 categories of items. "Junk I collected," "Stuff that's applicable to ...


17

Most people don't keep piles of gold under their beds, especially when they're as wealthy as a Lvl 18 character. Furthermore, wealth doesn't need to mean gold pieces either, but can be tied up in all kinds of assets. Finally, the wizard is evil. That gives us a lot to work with. Here are a few suggestions: The money is safely tucked away in investments. ...


17

Yes, this is explicitly discussed in the DMG in a "Behind the Curtains" box, bottom of page 54. It discusses the relationship between the treasure generated by encounters, and the character wealth level. As you can see, rewards using these tables generate more wealth than indicated. We assume characters use up that additional money on expenses such as ...


17

I once had a Shadowrun group who hit a truck transporting gold, and they walked away with something like two million nuyen (each) in a campaign where that was more than they had combined through character creation and their careers. It was somewhat of a mess, but it counteracted itself nicely, because I didn't just let them spend it on anything they could ...


16

The most straightforward answer I can give you is: have them gain less treasure during the next encounters, until you reach the intended balance. In games where XP and money (or their equivalents) are independent, it's fairly easy. The PCs are now over-equipped, so they could also be able to handle some higher level fights for bigger XP awards. While ...


15

There are a few types of hard to price treasures. Often, these are more story related and where the party is in the story is what places the value on the treasure. Example 1: A boon. Someone owes the party a favor. Maybe this person doesn't have much $$$ but has skills, knowledge or the ability to get knowledge that PCs might want down the line. Like he ...


15

Yes, yes it will. I do have experience with BFRPG. It's a very tidy clone of Basic D&D with some nice mechanical bits from d20, but it's still very much BD&D at its core. (I have experience with that too.) Judging what feel and style of campaign you're going for by your question and comments, giving full XP for gold will level them too fast: The ...


14

Any economist will tell you that a lot of factors can control the market price of an item. Here're a few that are easily applied to treasure: 1) Artistic merit An elegantly shaped leaf blade, inlaid with fine etching in an ancient script, the scabbard carefully wrapped in red silk? Or a straight, boring but functional, enchanted longsword? The latter ...


14

Turn the gold from asset to liability. Do not let them spend it in the first place. Perhaps they stay for a few more weeks in the dungeon/desert/swamp. And carrying the gold will be such a huge burden, especially if you have to choose between carrying your food and water rations or the gold. So perhaps they decide to hide it somewhere, to be collected later ...


14

It sounds like you're asking two questions here: first, what items can the PCs pick up from enemies, and second, what properties do those items retain from enemies' stat blocks? 1) What items can PCs pick up? In theory, everything the enemy is listed as carrying. In reality, as Lucas says in his answer, picking up everything quickly becomes hugely ...


13

I would call it at a 100 gems per pound unless you specifically state is a certain size (like the eyes of the Player Handbook Idol). Gems are weighed in carats and the problem is that the value per carat varies between gem types. Harnmaster is the only Fantasy RPG I know of that gives that information. Even armed with such information I feel it strays over ...


13

My group has just simply (for the sake of simplicity) just reduced whatever objects we find that have value to their gold value. This reduces book keeping and simplifies wealth in 4e. However, if you want to pedantic, or show that an item is far more significant than a run of the mill gem stone there are skills in 4e that can be used for appraisal. In the ...


12

If you are tired of the ho-hum attitude your party has with treasure, the first step is to not be ho-hum yourself. Which would you prefer to have, 100 Silver dollars (ok... 100 bucks in your pocket, gee-whiz), or 100 Roman Denarii? (full disclosure: I don't know anything about the relative silver value of a silver dollar vs. Denarii, but for the sake of ...


12

The idea of treasure in 4e is simple: the DM has a list of stuff and money that you should get that level. The consequence of this idea is non-trivial, as it leads to quantum treasure. If you carefully loot all of the random "trash" from monsters, pry out the iron nails of the doors, and otherwise find enough stuff to load up a cart and haul it back to ...


12

DnD 4e was balanced around the idea that monsters have an AC around level+14, other defenses around level+12, attacks against AC around level+5, against other defenses level+3. There are slight deviations, Solos have more of everything, Soldiers have more defenses, Brutes have more Fort, less Reflex and attack, but these are the approximate numbers. On the ...


10

How about one gem = 1 coin?


10

The record cut diamond is 105 carats, and is a couple inches long, by about an inch wide, and about 1/3" deep... Records for cut gems in Beryl and Corundum run to about 200-300 carats... That covers most of the precious stones. Therefore, figure most huge diamonds should be under half a cubic inch; a typical sack can hold thousands. A 2' by 4' sack has a ...


10

The rules are pretty explicit on that particular point, at least for standard loot: Refer to the treasure tables and roll d% once for each type of treasure (Coins, Goods, Items) on the Level section of the table that corresponds to the creature’s Challenge Rating (for groups of creatures, use the Encounter Level for the encounter instead). So for ...


9

Yes, but with adjustments. First, the treasure type doesn't mean there will always be treasure. It's entirely possible to come up with nothing after rolling for Treasure Type A. Second, once you've determined the hoard, it should be adjusted by your best judgement if there are many or few creatures. On sometimes rolling up no treasure at all, from the ...


9

My favorite is food or herbs. Food, especially if it's exotic or not native to the area, can be very valuable to someone with money to spend and a yearning to impress (or just a jones for something tasty and hard to find!!!). A barrel of oranges, a crate of bananas, or a sack full of coconuts may be worth thousands of gold pieces to some northern lord who ...


9

Your system strongly reminds me of the D20 Modern's wealth system 1 2, which was invented to cope with the complexities of modern finance (credit cards, CDs, loans, etc) not with a simple count of cash on hand. My experience with that system is that players find it more confusing than tracking a simple amount of currency. I would suspect with your ...


9

Rely on the Concordance system to balance/play the artifact Simple starting advice: stat the item as an appropriate item for the party at its current level (so, a +1 magic armour, possibly with some properties or abilities). Then, modify its stats as its concordance with the party changes. Concordance An artifact’s concordance score measures the ...


8

Change the value A sword +2 is worth 45 gold? Says who? Supply and demand will dictate what the sword is worth, with a base price of 45 gold maybe. Say the current social situation is tense (war, brigands, and civil unrest) then the price of weapons could be higher. If the PCs just defeated the great evil, who would want to pay for a +2 sword? Now, ...


8

You can leave stuff that isn't important lying around. It's possible/likely that he'd have a few basic pieces of treasure lying around as mementos. +1 spears, swords and other exotic weapons are pretty much decoration to an 18th level wizard. The big stuff should be in a vault - something that is going to be difficult for other people who aren't of a ...


8

“Wealth” is defined as the total value of the assets you have. A potion you used three levels ago is not an asset; its current value to you is zero. A potion in your backpack, on the other hand, has value: you can still use it. However, consumables, by definition, have fleeting value. Once used, they no longer have value, and a character ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible