Tag Info

New answers tagged

12

I just watched someone buy a painting for $3,500,000. It doesn't come to life, it doesn't tell the future, it doesn't even age while they stay young. They primarily bought it to annoy someone else that wanted it, as far as I could see. What you're having is a failure to roleplay. The players are not imagining what they would do in the characters' place. ...


1

I'm sure the mayor/governor/king/grand Poobah of the town/province/kingdom/Dominion where the adventures have their home base could come up with some way to spend a large amount of money that just entered their area of control. Your DM could tax the party to chew up some of it. Bribes for the authorities to overlook the pile of dead bodies that tend to ...


3

These two articles don't explicitly answer your question, but you may find them very interesting from a fluff standpoint. They offer dozens of ideas for how to hang plot hooks from the monetary and magical rewards your characters may pick up (which is possibly better than a pure crunch solution to the problem, depending on your perspective). On the ...


-1

What I think they mean is much like what was said in first edition. The owner of a magic item doesn't want to sell it, they want to trade it for another more usable magic item. Make your characters go to the local guild, royal, or imperial broker. If the local broker doesn't have what you want listed or even if he does what magic do you have to trade? If the ...


2

The text in the PHB doesn't prohibit the buying and selling of magic items in general. It pointing out that beyond a few common items it is a rare and special event. Pre-modern times had a similar issue in that there are items that could be bought and sold in a market but there were also luxury items so expensive that their manufacture and trade were a ...


6

Buying magic items is not, necessarily, out of the question. You just probably won't be buying it at Joe's Discount Adventurer's Shoppe. Magic items are outside the realm of all but the wealthiest nobles, and you won't normally come across magic items that can be purchased, but there is a key word there. Normally. And as you level up as adventurers you ...


10

I'm a bit surprised that nobody provided the ways gold can be spent in the players handbook, so maybe I'm missing something however. The biggest expenses after you purchase your armor and weapons in the 5e player handbook is "Downtime Activities" and "Services". There are two major expenses which while it looks like they may not require much gold, ...


18

You say: Once you've got the top level mundane gear and a stockpile of potions (which won't take long), doesn't gold become sort of worthless? equally, in a 3rd edition setting: Once you've got the top level wands, magic armor, vorpal swords and a stockpile of wondrous items (which won't take long), doesn't gold become sort of worthless? or to ...


51

Gold buys people Without a readily available source of high-end useful items, you can purchase large quantities of low-end things. For example, a hundred swords, a hundred kits of armor, a thousand man-years in soldier's wages and a dozen wagons of supplies can achieve a variety of things that a squad of powerful murderhobos can't. A supply of gold can ...


45

This is one of those "Let me tell you a story about how things were pre-third edition" questions. In every D&D edition from the 1970s to the year 2000, you couldn't buy magic items to spec. But you still got gold. We didn't complain about it and found it quite useful. In most of real world history, you couldn't buy magic items. Yet still gold/money is ...


26

"There's no magic item economy" does not equal "Magic items are never bought and sold". It's just that there's no set market for them, they're too rare for that. If a character puts word out that he's looking for a particular item, someone might manage to turn it up for the right price. Barring that, commissioning someone to create the item might be ...



Top 50 recent answers are included