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8

Ubiquity basically uses coin flips for rolls--heads is a success, tails isn't--except that it uses dice instead of coins. (You could say odd is failure, even is success, or that the low half is failure and the high half is success, or you could use a 4-sided die that had sides reading 0, 1, 1, 2, for fail-fail, fail-succeed, succeed-fail, succeed-succeed, ...


7

The best insight into an interesting philosophy of persuasion comes from Imre Lakatos' philosophy of science. In Science and Psuedoscience: First, I claim that the typical descriptive unit of great scientific achievements is not an isolated hypothesis but rather a research programme. [Science is not simply trial and error, a series of conjectures and ...


6

Blogs for Ubiquity can be found at: Sechin Tower, as mentioned by Nestor has great material for running pulp adventures The Black Campbell's blog has entries on Ubiquity in general and HEX in particular from time to time. He tends to produce posts on how to run games, play reports, and gear stats. Casting Shadows, my blog, has a slowly growing collection ...


5

The approach I take to resolve attempts at persuasion (Con/Diplomacy) is to first determine if the scene is looking for a short-term effect, or a long-term effect. The second step is to determine if this is an attempt versus a passive target (not trying to persuade back, just resisting) or versus an active target (arguing a point with intent to convince the ...


4

I think the following is the list of Wilderness Kids adventures and their first appearance at Gencon: Movie Mayhem ('08) Haunted House ('09) Jewels of Prometheus Falls ('10) Mummy Menace in the Museum ('10) Monkey Menace at the Zoo ('10) Revenge of the Saucer-Men ('10) Tentacles of Terror ('10) Treasure Trouble ('10) Save Christmas ('11) So far, only ...


3

The Ubiquity system does not have an exploding die mechanic, so it is not possible to roll more successes than you have in your pool. It does, however, provide many options to increase die-pools - most notably through the use of elements in the scene itself, or points which are reinforced via roleplay. In the example referenced, a hunter is tracking an ...


3

There are several ways of getting bonus dice to your dice pool Style points can be exchanged for +1 die per Style Point Skill Synergy can get a +2 bonus dice Teamwork can give an additional +2 per PC helping with appropriate skill or Skilled Assistant Talent Time (additional give bonuses; rushing gives penalties) Tools Note: Not all skill rolls are ...


3

Additions and expansions to the system include initiative, the use of magic, and certain setting considerations such as player species or period equipment which must be mechanically represented. Also see Nestor's answer here. Initiative The biggest difference in the system is essentially the implied dropping of the Continuous Combat initiative option from ...


3

A german Ubiquity-Blog called ubiHEX.


3

The Ubiquity System dice rolls give you a true bell graph when charted. I think one of the reasons why it does this is simplicity. One of the great things about the Ubiquity system is the use of "taking the average" for your skill rolls. This means that if you're sufficiently skilled, you don't need to roll dice if a specific difficulty is known (e.g., ...


2

Well, here's the thing. Wilderness Kid Adventures is not officially a separate RPG. What it is is an idea spawned in someone's feverish mind to create adventures geared towards the younger set using the Ubiquity system. There have been a few runs created, most if not all unveiled in GenCons past. The runs have been very well received (I believe this year's ...


2

To clarify, there are two types of actions in Ubiquity: simple and extended. For simple tasks, you achieve success by rolling more successes than the Difficulty given. For simple tasks, Difficulty values rarely, if ever, exceed 5. With extended actions, a task is given a total number of successes need to complete the task (in your example, 10). Each roll ...


2

I've run a number of runs using Ubiquity, both at home and at cons. I have very rarely had to deal with a player hoarding Style points (at least not for very long). It's a game-style thing; I encourage the players to use their Style by showing them the cool things they can do with them and that more Style points are always available as long as they ...


2

What I would do in this situation (keep in mind I have only passing familiarity with Ubiquity, so I'm answering this in a generic task resolution system sense) is keep it based on pass fail, but look at components much more closely. You're not thinking about it in terms of general conflict resolution, where the focus is the end goal, but you're looking at it ...


2

One more thing. There are a couple of mechanical differences with how some Talents work. For example, The Block and Parry Talents in HEX and All For One allow you to use the corresponding maneuver as a reflexive action (instead of an attack action), while in Desolation the Talents just give the character a +2 Defense bonus against specific types of attacks ...


1

Sechin Tower, whose a lead developer for Exile Games, has a writer's blog that includes material about pulp gaming with HEX and in general. That's one.


1

To me Style Chips are a way for a GM to reward both good role playing and when exciting things happen. I tend to award a lot of Style points, provided that they'll be used in an adventure. Sometimes, if a player is role playing their PC well, especially if they're doing things because of faults and critical failures on the dice (e.g., if the player rolls a ...



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