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29

This spell sends creatures into a magical slumber. Roll 5d8; the total is how many hit points of creatures this spell can affect. Creatures within 20 feet of a point you choose within range are affected in ascending order of their current hit points (ignoring unconscious creatures). Starting with the creature that has the lowest current hit points, each ...


24

Temporary Hit Points do not make you Conscious. Rules Compendium p. 258 on Temporary Hit Points indicate that: Not Real Hit Points: Temporary hit points aren’t healing, but rather a layer of “insulation” that attacks have to get through before they start dealing real damage to a target. Don’t add temporary hit points to a creature’s current hit points ...


22

An unconsciousDDI character cannot take actions. So they could not voluntarily take their second wind. If the character is also Dying, a 20 on the death save will allow them to spend a healing surge. However, if an unconscious character is the target of an effect such as Healing WordDDI then they can spend the healing surge. Also, an adjacent character ...


22

Nothing. There is no current rule that spell effects end when a caster is unconscious or dies unless they are specifically concentration spells. Thus, since Find Familiar is not a concentration spell, it's perfectly reasonable to assume that the familiar stays and is unaffected by the fact that his wizard is unconscious (or dead). And in fact, the ...


22

I guess this question has been answered previously via Twitter by Jeremy Crawford. Can you take a unconscious target with you using dimension door? @JeremyCrawford: Only a willing creature can travel with you via dimension door. You can't give consent when you're unconscious.


21

I'm really not sure where you're getting this from. Going unconscious ends concentration spells, but doesn't otherwise cancel your magic. Nor does it cause you to "forget" any spells / spell slots. Based on the text of the rules, going unconscious has no affect on spell duration. Spells with a duration listed in time units keep their duration. After ...


18

You can't treat the time you spend unconscious as a short rest. Short Rest A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds. There's a big difference between that and an hour spent unconscious because you almost died. I suspect ...


17

This is explained in the PHB, page 198: Knocking a Creature Out Sometimes an attacker wants to incapacitate a foe, rather than deal a killing blow. When an attacker reduces a creature to 0 hit points with a melee attack, the attacker can knock the creature out. The attacker can make this choice the instant the damage is dealt. The creature falls ...


16

Perhaps the default answer should be: "Yes, falling unconscious causes you to drop items whatever you are holding, but if an item remains within reach, you can pick it up again when you regain consciousness as a free action." This allows for speedy recovery to combat without removing the game play opportunity for the item to become out-of-reach (rolled ...


15

Different editions have gone different ways, but in 3.5, you don't lose prepared spells (or unused slots, for spontaneous casters). Unconscious characters can't concentrate, which may end some spell effects, but they keep any spell slots that were available to them. That said, it is worth noting that not all editions work this way. In 2e, for example, you ...


14

Mage armor, like virtually every buff spell, has a duration. It lasts for its duration, or until dispelled. Mage armor doesn't end because its target became unconscious. It continues to apply even WHILE they are unconscious. An unconscious, prone, mage armored target is still four AC points harder to hit than the same target would be if not mage armored. ...


14

No The results for monsters and creatures when damaged to 0 or below are not analogous. This is on the Player's Handbook p295 (Rules Compendium p260-1) Character When damage is dealt, if the result is between 0 or less (up to their bloodied value as a negative number then the damaged character is Dying (and usually Unconscious). If the damage takes a ...


13

The spell doesn't affect already sleeping creatures at all. Strictly speaking, the spell doesn't target creatures, it targets an area; and affects or ignores creatures according to their current hitpoints and whether they're already unconscious. Creatures ... are affected in ascending order of their current hit points (ignoring unconscious creatures). ...


13

Not using spells or magical items, or magical effects, a creature becomes Unconscious if: Damage reduces you to 0 hit points and fails to kill you, you fall unconscious (see appendix A). This unconsciousness ends if you regain any hit points. Succeeding on death saves leaves you unconscious but stable. Miss your save versus Drow poison by five or more ...


11

When a PC is reduced to 0HP they fall Unconscious and they start making Death Saving Throws at the beginning of their turns. Once they fail three death saves, they die (PHB pg.197). Attack rolls against an Unconscious character have advantage and any attack that hits the character is a Critical Hit if the attacker is within 5 feet of the character ...


10

To answer your question from a rules-as-written perspective, no. There are no rules for sapping, choking, cold-clocking, etc. that would allow you to bring an enemy to unconscious without first dropping their HP to 0. I should point out something, though: choosing to knock a character unconscious at 0 HP instead of letting them go to the dying stage is ...


9

No, Assuming the power used was Summon Thought Servant DDI, it works exactly like a Heal check. Opportunity Action: Triggered when a dying ally adjacent to the servant starts its turn; targets the triggering ally; the servant makes a Heal check to stabilize the target or to allow the target to use his or her second wind In a Heal check, the subject is ...


8

In my opinion, you handled it right. About future use of "willing creatures" here is a simple-stupid way to pass around wording of that rule: if you read it RAW, it can mean 2 things: Character is in his right mind and is actively wiling to go to paradise... (Present Continuous). He wants to go there NOW. Character wants to go to that paradise. I mean ...


7

No and No Soul Feast is a free action. Unconsciousness: While a creature is unconscious, it is helpless, it can’t take actions, and it takes a -5 penalty to all defenses. It also can’t flank and is unaware of its surroundings. When a creature is subjected to this condition, it falls prone, if possible. See also helpless and prone. Soul Feast grants ...


7

The current text reads: First Failed Saving Throw: The target is unconscious instead of slowed (save ends). This was clarified in Essentials, and the errata was back ported to DDI.


6

Certain Poisons Do the Job "Sample Poisons" on DMG p.257 has two possibilities: Essence of Ether (inhaled) and Oil of Taggit (contact) cause their victims to fall unconscious. At 300gp and 400gp per dose, RAW they are rather spendy ways to accomplish the task. It would be straightforward to house-rule a less expensive version of Essence of Ether that ...


6

Since your question didn't ask for RAW but others thoughts on how it was handled and how others would rule (maybe a RAI answer) I'd like to offer a comparative answer. While it is a completely different game, 3.5 has a rule that states, spells with the "(Harmless)" tag can affect unconscious characters. I would use this same rule here since 1) transporting ...


4

You make death saving throws only when you are dying; that is, when you have the dying condition. Once stabilized, you effectively no longer have the dying condition; it's been replaced with the stabilized condition. General principle: you only make rolls when called for by the rules. If you can act, you might be able to trigger some roll, but stabilized ...


4

The rules certainly imply that the ruling was incorrect, but nothing says for sure. A preponderance of circumstantial evidence weighs heavily against you, however. To begin, Thomas is correct that the spell hasn't ended, so the feather fall aspect of the spell does not officially come into play. Instead, we are left with dealing with the “realities” of ...


4

On the one hand, Unless a spell has a perceptible effect, a creature might not know it was targeted by a spell at all. An effect like crackling lightning is obvious, but a more subtle effect, such as an attempt to read a creature’s thoughts, typically goes unnoticed, unless a spell says otherwise. So the Sleep spell itself won't wake up a ...


3

The player would be correct if the spell ended. But in the case of this spell he is wrong. If you take a look at the spell it has no concentration required to have the spell active. Instead the spell has a fixed duration after which you float downwards (even if the spell is dispelled instead of it ending normally). Thus in that case he is correct he would ...


3

The rule on what counts as a Short Rest is as follows: Short Rest A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds. Note that it says "nothing more strenuous than" those activities. I'd say that lying unconscious is definitely less ...


3

As a general rule, unless otherwise indicated in the spell description, the targets must be within range at the time the spell is cast (and Sleep doesn't say otherwise). The duration of the Sleep spell is how long the affected creatures will remain asleep if they are not woken by other means. Once asleep, they can be moved to any distance without breaking ...


3

How about another work-around: a conscious and willing character has to pick up or touch an unconscious character in order to transport them with him/her to the paradise? At your discretion, you could make your conscious characters spend an action picking up or touching the unconscious characters in order for the rod to bring them along too. It would allow ...


2

You can NOT knock a player character unconscious via damage without giving him the dying status, that means, giving him the chance of rolling a DST. You can only knock monsters and DM-controlled characters unconscious via damage. The Rules Compendium, when discussing knocking a creature unconscious at 0hp instead of killing them on page 261, is very clear ...



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