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-1

I think that this However, as a Paladin, your creed sometimes leads you to not want to engage in full-blown combat with a potential adversary begs the question "Why not?" - I suggest that you ask another question that specifically addresses the inherent assumption here. As @Miniman says, 5e does not have the concept of non-lethal or subdual damage ...


2

No, Repelling Blast cannot be used to deal non-lethal damage. Only melee attacks are able to deal the non-lethal damage required to knock out and automatically stabilize a creature. Page 198, under "Knocking a Creature Out", states: When an attacker reduces a creature to 0 hit points with a melee attack, the attacker can knock the creature out. The ...


0

There isn't a concept of "non-lethal damage" in 5e; instead it has: Sometimes an attacker wants to incapacitate a foe, rather than deal a killing blow. When an attacker reduces a creature to 0 hit points with a melee attack, the attacker can knock the creature out. The attacker can make this choice the instant the damage is dealt. The creature falls ...


6

This one is a little bit more tricky to answer than your previous question about Temp HP from one effect canceling out any others that rely on Temp HP from another effect. (Found here: Dark One's Blessing and Armor of Agathys Synergy? ) So then, you have to think in order of events. Combat happens very quickly (an entire round happens in the span of 6 ...


-2

You must have the temporary hp from Armor of Agythis active. You can only have one source of temporary hp at any given time. PHB p. 198 Healing can’t restore temporary hit points, and they can’t be added together. If you have temporary hit points and receive more of them, you decide whether to keep the ones you have or to gain the new ones. ...


9

It seems like you have come to the conclusion yourself, just unsure which to apply. The rules seem clear, as you described from PHB pg 198 "...they (temporary hit points) can't be added together. If you have temporary hit points and receive more of them, you decide whether to keep the ones you have or gain new ones..." Armor of Agathys: You gain ...


4

It only means "an unlimited number of times," not that it bypasses any other normal rules about actions, casting times, and turns.


1

At will abilities are almost identical to cantrips. For example I'll cite the Warlock invocations located in the PHB. pg.110. Numerous invocations have the repeated text: ...at will, without expending a spell slot... Some have additional requirements, such as Chains of Carceri where the at will ability can not be cast on the same creature without a ...


3

The at will here is in contrast to abilities that give you a spell X times a short/long rest/day. You could have an ability that gives you a spell 3 times every long rest, but also costs a spell slot when used. Or have it work like normal spells on your spell list, castable at will (or as long as you have in prepared), but it does take a spell slot.


-2

The way I read it, based on the wording in the PHB is this: The third paragraph states that you can "transform one magic weapon into your pact weapon". Transform means to change structurally. So point 1 for the mutability of a magical pact weapon. It never states that you summon a pact weapon, you always create one. When you create, you "choose the form ...


1

Actually, some warlocks get their powers from heritage - not just inheriting pacts (though it happens), but it's suggested from direct descent as well. Also consider some of the fluff offered by the Eldritch Theurge... "Just as the warlock can come from something other than a fiendish origin, so too can the eldritch theurge. Perhaps warlocks gain ...


20

There is no RAW answer, so it's up to the DM. The way I would rule is that if there is no Patron there is no power. I would do this with the divine classes as well. I don't do it to be mean to the player, but for the cool story options it provides. From a story perspective, there is a really cool way you can handle this (I've done it but used a Cleric and ...


3

Short version: Due to lack of RAW information on warlock's power, the outcome of such event should be determined by DM. Plausible outcomes are determined by nature of warlock's power (which is determined by dm). If the power comes directly from entity, it would mean power loss, and if it comes from some other place and "pacted entity" simply made that ...


4

I am assuming you are getting Sneak Attack from the Sneak of Shadows multiclass feat. As you say SA requires you to use a light blade, a hand crossbow, a shortbow, or a sling. What it does not require is the attack to be a weapon attack, so as long as you are using one of those as an implement you can apply your SA damage. The easiest way to do this would ...


5

No, a Warlock is not able to use their telepathy through their Familiar. The section referencing sharing sight/hearing only pertains to sharing those senses. The Warlock is not possessing or otherwise present where the Familiar is, whereas the Awakened Mind class feature references (emphasis mine): You can communicate telepathically with any creature ...


3

No. PHB page 110, the wording is limited to within 30 feet of you. You can communicate telepathically with any creature you can see within 30 feet of you.


0

I would say it changes to whatever you want it to be, per two parts of the ability from the PHB: You can transform one magic weapon into your pact weapon by performing a special ritual while you hold the weapon. The weapon is "transformed" into your pact weapon, which per PHB definition of a pact weapon, you choose the form of your pact weapon. ...


13

A wider quotation makes the intent quite clear: When a creature makes an attack roll against you, you can use your reaction to impose disadvantage on that roll. If the attack misses you, your next attack roll against the creature has advantage if you make it before the end of your next turn. Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again ...


4

By my reading it would indeed be the former. Entropic ward is a defensive feature with a conditional buff on the probable counterattack.


-2

Veteran DM here. Id have to say I think it could be cast because: If it's your voice exactly, then it's some sort of telepathic magic that has completely translated your speech to the familiar in its exactness. At the end of the day, the spellcaster is not near the target of the healing spell, and I'd assume concentrating/targetting occurs on the wounded ...


1

I don't think the rules-as-written would allow it, because allowing logic to say "I can deliver this spell in a way that isn't explicitly specified" is usually broken. However, the idea makes sense to me, if I were GM'ing I might well decide that you can provided: The target is within 60 ft of you And can hear your familiar. That doesn't let you cast ...


1

The simplest answer is no because the rule says no, only flavor text vaguely indicates yes, and rules trump flavor text. D&D is a game, not a simulation of life in a fantasy world. The explanation of how the weave works is just flavor text and is merely an afterthought that makes the PHB somewhat more interesting to read. But the rule itself is what the ...


18

No. Consider that: Verbal (V) ...the particular combination of sounds, with specific pitch and resonance, sets the threads of magic in motion. If you can argue that this is ALL that is needed to cast a purely verbal spell, then anyone or anything with a mouth can cast it. Let's get more basic: suppose you don't have spell slots left to ...


4

I would allow it, but "in range" is iffy For me the primary question here is what does "in range" mean, exactly? Does the target have to be in range of you (the caster), or the place that your voice happens to be coming from, when those are not the same place? The definition of "range" in the PHB does not say anywhere what the distance is measured from, ...


7

No, you can't do verbal spellcasting through your familiar. From Find Familiar's last paragraph (PHB p240) we see you're granted permission only to "deliver" touch spells through your familiar, but you're not granted permission to do any other spellcasting through them (nor does the familiar itself cast the touch spell): Finally, when you cast a spell ...


-1

Yes, you can indeed cast the spell. The prerequisites are met by satisfying all of the conditions. First off, the prerequisite of your familiar being able to cast a spell is covered adequately by Find Familiar. The familiar uses it's reaction, and you use your attack roll. This means YOU are casting the spell while the familiar simply physically delivers ...



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