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0

Per RAW, the situation isn't really covered. Deferring to reasonable interpretation then... If your warlock has "lost" his voice, this implies that he did at one time have a voice. Extrapolation suggests that this is the voice he would speak with through his familiar. (See also KorvinStarmast's comment on the question, mentioning how losing your tongue ...


-2

This is more of a character-choice. If your (as approved by DM) background includes a physical impossibility towards speech, you don't have a voice. If you choose to remain silent, you do. If you have a voice, the familiar has one. If you don't have a voice, the familiar hasn't got one either. Remove thou tonsils? (Or not.)


15

There likely isn't a RAW answer, but... Being permanently mute is not a condition that the core rules represent, so any answer here is going to be speculative and highly subject to the DM's rule on the matter. However, I would encourage a DM ruling on this to allow it, particularly because the character is taking on a significant disadvantage that isn't ...


2

How can we gain the entire benefits of the staff? So, there isn't really a way for the Warlock to use the staff to it's full potential without dipping into another class, however since your group is just hitting level 3, if the Fighter chose the Eldritch Knight Archetype, or the Rogue chose the Arcane Trickster Archetype, they would be casters, who would ...


2

RAW, the option is simply not available for a Warlock without multi-classing. That stated, the staff is actually quite powerful. Please remember that it: Grants you a +1 bonus to AC. Counts as a magical weapon, so it's useful against things like Gargoyles and Werewolves and Elementals. Almost everyone is proficient with the quarterstaff and it doesn't ...


6

If the Warlock meets the prerequisites to dual class as a Wizard or Sorcerer, per page 285 of the PHB, Mage Armor and Shield would appear on spell lists. Editorial: being able to access the spells on the staff isn't worth multi-classing. The short term cost of stunting growth as a warlock isn't out weighed by access to the two spells and a level of wizard/...


11

Short answer is no. The staff requires that you have the spells in your spell list in order to use them. This is similar to many magical items, in particular scrolls. So your warlock will only be able to use the AC bonus. This is RAW. However there is another option that would be up to the DM's discretion that would allow the Warlock to cast Mage Armor,...


0

Warlocks have a pact feature called Pact of the Book, which allows you to take an invocation called Book of Ancient Secrets that allows to ritual cast any type of ritual spell inside of the book, and allows you to add any type of ritual spell into the book. So yes you can, you just have to add said spell into your book and you are good to go.


1

Wizards typically have spare books laying around and secure to avoid the hassle of rebuilding their repertoire from which they can prepare so yes Wizards can have multiple books and most times do. Warlocks on the other hand do not have spellbooks. They have spells "known" much like Sorcerors that is to say you don't use a spellbook. The Pact of the Tome ...


5

There are plenty of rules about a Wizard having a second spellbook. But since you're a warlock, none of them apply to you and I won't comment on them here. Only pact of the tome Warlocks have a grimoire. But you don't copy spells into it, or prepare from it, or do any of the "usual" wizardly things with it.\$^1\$ Specifically: Warlocks don't prepare spells ...


6

You are correct - you would not gain +1d6 Eldritch Blast As you yourself wrote, you are effectively a Warlock 11 for Eldritch Blast damage, and going up to effectively Warlock 12 does not increase it. But look on the bright side - your Fortitude and Reflex saves go up by 1! If you do not think you will get to warlock level 10 (effective level 13), ...



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