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46

Stop dealing with the 98% of the population. If they're so rich, they are now peers of the 2% of the population who rule in various ways. Peasants may have little to offer in reward (perhaps fealty?), but queens, nobles, generals, and the heads of merchant empires will want to either control or ally with such powerful figures – before their rivals do. As a ...


31

The conditions required to get the maximum possible wealth bonus are very artificial, but for the sake of argument let's assume the following: Dilettante taken as Profession an 8 rolled on 2d4 for starting wealth rolling 18 for Wisdom at character creation always rolling 20 on wealth checks when leveling up every feat spent on Windfall always spending the ...


25

As BESW said, don't expect the game system to model reality. That said, if you need to figure out stats for potato tea... It's an ingested poison. As the SRD says, Ingested poisons are virtually impossible to utilize in a combat situation. A poisoner could administer a potion to an unconscious creature or attempt to dupe someone into drinking or ...


17

It's a major decision not to be made lightly D&D 3.5's power curve is strongly influenced by wealth. A character with magic items is obviously much more powerful than a character without, and to an equal extent a character with level 15 items is probably going to kick the face of a character with level 5 items regardless of what level the characters ...


13

I see no problem. Let's assume the characters are not essentially rich, they just have very valuable equipment. They could have stolen it, found it, or rewarded with it. Apart from that, they don't need to be very rich. If they want to trade their equipment for a cheaper one and buy a house or a farm (if they can), let them have it. On the other hand, ...


13

Ignore the WBL Chart at your own risk Especially if you’re going under. The WBL tables are a suggestion, but changing WBL and ignoring the tables is an extremely dangerous thing to do within the mathematics of 3.x. Few things are as broad in their scope. Changing wealth affects every character in the world, or at least every player character, and can ...


13

So first of all, the poison list isn't meant to list "anything that could be poisonous if ingested," which includes a lot of stuff, but things that are useful as proper poisons (subtle, easy to deliver, etc.). Compare solanine (the stuff in potatoes) to arsenic (which is listed on the poison table) - not only is it less than half as poisonous (requiring ...


12

Let them, so long as it makes coherent sense in the world. In a sandbox game, the players are just one group in a larger world. Your job is to run the world, which means you're going to be fairly reactive to what the players are doing. If they want to hunt dire boars, let them. Stopping them would require a good reason here. Maybe at some point you throw a ...


12

@SevenSidedDie has covered the first part of the question thoroughly. As for conversion to real world dollars, there is a table on page 145 of d20 Future (ISBN:0786934239): Purchase DC Item Cost 2 $5 15 $500 20 $2,000 30 $35,000 40 $650,000 50 $12,000,000 ...


12

I used to play The Dark Eye (Das Schwarze Auge) myself and in my opinion it strongly resembles medieval Europe - apart from the obvious fantasy additions. It's rule books give information of the economy, trade and demography of nearly everything. Therefore the dilemma is quite understandable; in medieval Europe a sword was worth a fortune and in the world ...


11

There is no rule inconsistency; it is a disconnect between game logic and real-life experience. D&D is not a reality simulator; its mechanics are abstracted and --as you've noticed-- the value of things are proportionate to their use in adventuring rather than the difficulty in making them or the value of their component parts. While many people play ...


10

OK, decided to look into this. There are no nice, neat tables that I can find. That said, the actual information does appear to be available, excepting for the Wu Jen. Complete Adventurer is the most straight-forward: it’s included in each class’s entry as Starting Gold. Complete Warrior neglected starting wealth entirely, but it’s ...


10

Cohort gets half a share of treasure See @Ben-Jamin’s answer. Personally, I feel that Leadership is already an incredibly powerful feat. Making the Leader pay for that opportunity to double their action economy seems entirely justifiable to me. Making the feat double your action economy and add extra wealth seems even worse than it is otherwise. ...


10

The rule still is: 3 uncommon items of level +1, equal level, and level -1, and gold for common items equal to level -1. After level 1, mundane gear is free, subject to GM consent. The mechanism of granting a character 3 uncommon items and gold equal to an item of level -1 scales almost perfectly with their magic item system. The only times I've really been ...


9

You should certainly let them do what they like After all, that is the point of a sandbox game. Railroading is bad in general but particularly for a sandbox. Besides, the most lucrative business in Dungeons & Dragons is adventuring. If you look at the Craft, Perform, and Profession skills, even astronomical DCs still result in paltry income compared ...


9

Your system strongly reminds me of the D20 Modern's wealth system 1 2, which was invented to cope with the complexities of modern finance (credit cards, CDs, loans, etc) not with a simple count of cash on hand. My experience with that system is that players find it more confusing than tracking a simple amount of currency. I would suspect with your ...


9

There are several ways to approach this. The most common and easiest is: Handwaving. In short, probably the traditional approach to this problem is to essentially ignore it. The peasant needs to offer a reward of 1000 Gold Pieces and it doesn't make any sense for his entire family to have anything close to that... well he does anyway. It's not realistic, ...


9

Your greatest assets when it comes to determining appropriate treasure are the Treasure from Encounters table on page 54 of the Dungeon Master's guide, and the Character Wealth by Level guideline (WBL) on page 135 of the same book. In theory, random treasure generation should have the PCs end up with something in line with those guidelines, but if you are ...


8

“Wealth” is defined as the total value of the assets you have. A potion you used three levels ago is not an asset; its current value to you is zero. A potion in your backpack, on the other hand, has value: you can still use it. However, consumables, by definition, have fleeting value. Once used, they no longer have value, and a character ...


8

As an experienced GM, I generally ignore the wealth by level chart for all purposes except as a quick and convenient guide to equipping custom NPCs. The documented goal of the Wealth By Level sidebar and table is to tell you what default level of value of gear might keep an average party of the average number of PCs of some average build hitting the default ...


7

Strict adherence to WBL is a terrible idea Keep in mind that WBL is a guideline. I've heard of people using it as a hard rule, where the DM checks how much wealth the PCs have, and makes sure they find enough to meet WBL. This creates a potentially very destructive feedback, where characters get rewarded for refusing impopular treasure (because they may get ...


7

The issue with most wealth value systems, such as above, is the order you buy things becomes important. For example, if you have a wealth of 5 on that scale, generally your wealth would go down if you purchase anything at that value, to represent spending a significant income. This means if you buy lower cost things later, your wealth would be lower and you ...


6

The suggestion I'd make on handling parties that use an abnormal amount of consumables is the one of staying true to what little rules we do have: hand out an appropriate amount of treasure, and let the players decide how to apply it. If they spend lots of gold on consumables, they end up with fewer permanent magic items. If they spend little... well, ...


6

No, you should not. Fixing party wealth means the players don't need to strive or explore in order to find good stuff, because Fate (you) will engineer events so that they're taken care of. That's the opposite of the essential nature of a sandbox campaign. But what happens if they have pitiful gear for their level? Or conversely, have gear that's too good ...


6

Relationships as Rewards Your awareness concerning the disparity-in-wealth issue might be more of a solution than a problem. While many GMs are looking for trouble for PCs to get into, you have already identified an excellent jumping-off point for all kinds of adventures. Poor NPCs will naturally seek help from characters that appear to have more ...


5

The original quote was about strict adherence. If you're just asking should you use it at all, the answer is yes. It's a good chart that provides very important information about how the game is balanced. I was a player in a game where we got below half those numbers due to the GM wanting a low magic game, and as soon as we hit level 10+ monsters, things got ...


5

Your PF books and SRD have tables and advice on character wealth. Pathfinder, like 3.x before it, has a clear wealth progression. About halfway down this page you'll find Table: Character Wealth by Level as well as some other useful tables and tips. I'm not familiar with how closely the Beginner Box campaign follows the standard PF treasure-per-encounter ...


5

Nope. Guidelines for how wealthy or magic-powered PCs were didn't really become important until 3e introduced a system that cared about balance enough to need official guidelines. In 2e, everyone just winged it and it worked fine. Your provisional rule is pretty much how it was always done: pick some numbers, play! The actual numbers picked are pretty much ...


4

Your examples look a lot like the Resources obstacles in Burning Wheel. Characters in Burning Wheel have a Resources attribute, which they can roll to acquire things. It represents money, favors, and influence. When you fail a roll, your Resources can get Taxed (depleted temporarily) until you take measures, such as Get a Job, to recover them. Treasure ...


4

The closest thing to an errata to this would be the loot rules used by the most recent version of Lair Assault. We use straightforward rules to equip characters for their deadly battles. Each character receives one magic item of one level higher than their level (level + 1), one of their level (level + 0), and one of one level lower than their level ...



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