Hot answers tagged

80

So a DM is given the tool of “Rule 0,” the authority to change things in the game, for a very particular purpose: to facilitate and improve the game. Thus, banning a weapon can be justified for a variety of reasons, for example: It is justified if the game is intended to model a certain setting that wouldn’t have had that weapon; the DM is using his ...


75

Yes, your DM can veto it. No, your DM shouldn't veto it. While the DM has last say over anything the rules don't cover, or even house rules he wants in the game, he doesn't play D&D alone. DM and players should co-operate so that everyone has fun doing what they want with the characters, system and setting. In that spirit, you should talk to him and ...


46

DM's have authority over their games - Yes he can do that. However... conjecture aside... Vikings are regarded as some of the most successful barbarians - hence the Viking Age. Vikings utilized polearms. Yes... it's true. But they weren't called polearms of course. Our friends from Hurstwic can provide some useful information. The Atgeir: The atgeirr was ...


34

Can he veto my character's weapon choice just because he doesn't like it? Your DM is not vetoing your character's weapon choice just because he doesn't like it and I don't think it's productive to approach this with that in mind as "the problem I'm up against". You've reported why he vetoed it, and it's because he has a vision of barbarians as a ...


31

Though at first glance it might appear, that if the DM does not give out magical weapons, then many monsters in the DM guide book will make half of the party irrelevant unless the DM gives out magical items and thus the game is dependent on magical items, unlike what the article states. However, a close look at the classes and character abilities reveals ...


29

It depends on intention and synergy from feats. Looking at only the weapons themselves, the Execution Axe has a .075 DPR increase over the Mordenkrad. That's not much. Considering common magical items and feats, the Gouge is best from a whole-character point of view. First, let's look at the superior weapons available to us that are two-handed and ...


29

There are two sections to the attack line, a name, and then the stats. I’m going to format the name in bold and the stats in italics: longsword +5 (1d8+2/19-20) Thus, the name of the weapon – which weapon it actually is – is just “longsword.” As in the generic, unmodified, non-masterwork, non-magic longsword (stats in the “One-handed Martial Melee” ...


27

According to a regular in Gygax and Arneson's early Blackmoor and Greyhawk games, the cleric was largely draw from the priests in 70s vampire movies, with the prohibition against edged weapons inspired by legends and fantasy fiction: Ahem. I was there. In CHAINMAIL there were wizards that functioned as artillery. Then there was Dave Arneson's ...


24

General advice for any issue with a trouble player is to talk with them and clearly explain the trouble that you are facing. You should definitely explain the problems you are having with trying to keep track of all the custom stuff and see if the two of you can find a solution. However since this is a question specifically about Savage Worlds, I figured I'd ...


24

Magic weapons and armour are not specified in the PHB. You can find them in the DMG, pages 213 and 152 respectively. Or in the Hoard of the Dragon Queen supplement, page 2. With that said, yes, a +X weapon gives +X to both attack and damage. +X armour gives +X to AC (on top of the AC that armour of its type provides).


23

The number before the slash indicates normal range. The number after the slash indicates "long range" - when an attack is performed at long range, it takes a -2 penalty to the attack roll.


22

Pricing OK, so there are basically three costs being added together here: Base cost of the Elven Thinblade: 100 gp Masterwork cost (prerequisite for any magic weapon): 300 gp +2-equivalent cost (+1 keen, as keen is a +1-equivalent): 22×2,000=8,000 gp Total is 8,400 gp: outside of your budget. A +1 thinblade would be 12×2,000+300+100 = 2,400 ...


22

First, ask your DM if you can qualify for abjurant champion with an exotic weapon; you don’t need proficiency in any martial weapons to take Exotic Weapon Proficiency, and there are some better options for exotic weapons. If exotic weapons are not allowed: Longbow There’s not a whole lot of point to getting any martial weapon; any situation where attacking ...


22

The Player's Handbook gives an explicit reference to how darts are thrown. In the section on Underwater Combat (PHB 198) we find: the attack roll has disadvantage [underwater] unless the weapon is a crossbow , a net, or a weapon that is thrown like a javelin (including a spear, trident, or dart). This means that a dart is not thrown spinning like a ...


22

YES, a mundane arrow fired from a magical bow overcomes the resistance In the D&D 5e Errata, this issue is addressed: Magic Weapons (p. 140). The section ends with a new paragraph: “If a magic weapon has the ammunition property, ammunition fired from it is considered magical for the purpose of overcoming resistance and immunity to nonmagical attacks ...


22

So, first up - anyone can use any weapon. Proficiency merely determines whether you can add your proficiency bonus to your attack rolls. Proficiency with a weapon allows you to add your proficiency bonus to the attack roll for any attack you make with that weapon. If you make an attack roll using a weapon with which you lack proficiency, you do not ...


21

It means it's a Double Weapon You can use a double weapon to fight as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. You can choose to wield one end of a double weapon two-handed, but it cannot be ...


21

You improvise with the closest match. Here the player wants to set their arrows on fire, fair game to them; what else is on fire? A torch. The torch text states: If a torch is used in combat, treat it as a one-handed improvised weapon that deals bludgeoning damage equal to that of a gauntlet of its size, plus 1 point of fire damage. So for their ...


21

Your weapon can be drawn before you go in. There's nothing to say that you can't walk around holding your weapon, though provision of light and carrying of gear are common reasons to have sheathed a weapon. (Social nicety is another.) When can you draw it? Out of combat you likely just declare your draw and GM says "okay." In combat, on your turn, you ...


21

At the bottom of this slippery slope are players who demand a weapon with a hammer head, backed by an axe blade and topped with a spike so they they can select any sort of damage at all. With enough avid searching, they'll even find historical examples. The balance issue is then between these do-it-all weapons and the does-one-job-well weapons. The weapon ...


20

This is true in the majority of RPGs I've seen, including all prior versions of D&D. The problem is one of level of abstraction; how specific do you really want to get with differences in defensive capabilities between different weapons? Some of the older editions (and certain versions of Traveller, for example) had varying to-hit based on your weapon ...


20

Limited to +1, overridden by magic bonuses. Masterwork weapons have a +1 enhancement bonus to hit (but not to damage) because they are well-crafted. Magic bonuses to weapons are enhancement bonuses (which apply to both hit and damage rolls) as well. Because they both have the "enhancement" descriptor, these bonuses to hit do not stack with each other. All ...


20

My initial rules reading, maybe... Opportunity Attacks In a fight, everyone is constantly watching for enemies to drop their guard. You can rarely move heedlessly past your foes without putting yourself in danger; doing so provokes an opportunity attack. You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out ...


20

No, you can't use a two-handed weapon with one hand. Two-Handed. This weapon requires two hands when you attack with it. Even if you could, two-weapon fighting is defined as When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand, you can use a bonus action to attack with a different light melee ...


19

The idea of "Flaming arrows" can be emulated using the Flaming Property: Flaming: Upon command, a flaming weapon is sheathed in fire that deals an extra 1d6 points of fire damage on a successful hit. The fire does not harm the wielder. The effect remains until another command is given. Dipping an arrow in oil could in a way emulate the Flaming ...


19

Probably. The entries for Staff and Quarterstaff are different in the equipment list. Under the Arcane Focus section you get: a specially constructed staff (p. 48). this is distinctly different (and quite a bit more expensive) than a typical quarter staff (the arcane focus version runs 5gp vs 2sp for a quarterstaff). So no, a quarterstaff cannot ...


19

I'm going to assume your player wants to eschew metal weapons not simply because he thinks he's compelled to (he's not; it's a compulsion for armour only), but because it's awesome character flavour. Working from that assumption, lets look at the obvious option: The 3.5 Dungeon Master's Guide, on page 144, has rules for bone weapons. While not strictly the ...


19

Sure, why not? After all, there are historical scabbards for polearms. They just don't dangle on your hip like a sword one, but since also a longsword scabbard don't fit a scimitar, the item will magically change to fit your weapon.


18

There are weapons that give a bonus to AC. Off the top of my head, the parrying dagger and most of the double weapons have the defensive property, which gives you +1 AC for wielding them with another weapon in your other hand (or wielding them in both hands, in the case of the double weapons). There are also feats that give you an AC bonus for certain ...


18

There's an interesting item in the Wikipedia article Sources and influences on the development of Dungeons & Dragons about Clerics. Quoting from an old Dragon Magazine article it states: The cleric is largely inspired by folklore of the medieval cleric of Templar.[13] Like the Templars described in White's The Once and Future King, clerics in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible