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4

If you're really interested in making this an important part of campaign flavor, you might want to take a page from 4E Darksun and the "Reckless breakage" option: Reckless Breakage: When you roll a natural 1 on an attack roll, your weapon has a chance to break. You can accept the result, automatically missing the attack as usual, but keeping your weapon ...


4

You're correct that ivory or bone weapons would not be practical in a realistic medieval setting where foes have metal armor. Now that we have that out of the way, I would under no circumstance penalize a player for being creative or for role playing. The weapons will have to be infused by the spirits of the ancestors, etc etc, AKA enchanted. The Barb ...


1

Druids who want to get around the "can't wear metal armor" rule can make their armor out of dragonhide; it's identical to metal armor except that it costs twice as much. (And you have to kill a big dragon to get it!) If your player wants to invent a "can't use metal weapons" rule and then work around it, it seems reasonable to adapt the dragonhide rules: a ...


7

Yes, with magic and the appropriate craft(weaponsmithing) skill. To solve the "hardness problem" have a high level wizard cast "hardening" on the object. On the 3.5 hardness scale, iron is 10, stone is 8, and bone 6 (as per DMG p144). After the spell is applied, at level 12, the bone will be hardness 12, a fair amount harder than iron/steel. Combining this ...


2

Yes you can. One example of a pretty good bow made from ivory is: Bone Bow (Frostburn, pg. 75) Cost: 250 gp Damage:1d10(M) Critical: ×3 Range: 120 ft. Range: 4 lb. Type: Piercing Description: This powerful and oversized bow is designed to fire exceptionally large arrows specially made for it. Made of the bones and sinews of huge ...


19

I'm going to assume your player wants to eschew metal weapons not simply because he thinks he's compelled to (he's not; it's a compulsion for armour only), but because it's awesome character flavour. Working from that assumption, lets look at the obvious option: The 3.5 Dungeon Master's Guide, on page 144, has rules for bone weapons. While not strictly the ...


5

Give the weapon bonuses or advantage on things other than To Hit and Damage. For example, this weapon has a very well-made grip. You have advantage on checks to resist disarming. For example, this weapon has hooks that aid in climbing. You have advantage on climbing rolls (including climbing on to larger creatures). For example, this weapon is covered in ...


10

I can find no reference to stats for weapons or armor made from ivory in 3.5. (Note: BESW found some) Athas.org, in the Dark Sun Campaign Setting, describes the inferior materials used on Athas, due to the scarcity of metal, as including bone. Since ivory is just bone, this could be used for ivory. Normally-metal weapons made from inferior materials apply a ...


-1

If you're up for it, there are rules about objects and their hit points. (In the PHB, they mention such for boats; in the Hoard of Dragons, they have a couple of doors with HP...) For example, you could say a door has 50 hp and to break it you need an ax and hit it until you generate 50 hp of damage. Not too important if you are not in a combat situation, ...


3

The only way I see to do that RAW is by treating these Dwarven weapons as magical. Possible minor properties such as Gleaming and Unbreakable might make thematic sense in this instance.


12

All the things which in real life denote "superior craftsmanship" are not really made into mechanics, in 5E, outside of describing the weapon as "better made". That said, you have some options: Saves and Breakage It's pretty rare that objects have to make saving throws in D&D in general, but sometimes stuff like acid, intense heat, or rust monsters ...


8

They did away with Masterwork items in 5e. So we are into house rule territory. In which you could import the old Masterwork effect: +1 to hit but not to damage (compared to a magic +1, which does both). Or you could just fluff it and say - sword looks particular well, compare to other works of swords. Fluff also means it doesn't carry any mechanical ...


0

A torch also counts as a simple weapon, and most like a club as you mentioned. Anything you can pickup can be an improvised weapon, but things that approximate simple weapons can be wielded with proficiency if you have proficiency in simple weapons. Therefore the torch, lit or unlit could be wielded as a club, and a lot torch would add 1hp of Fire damage. In ...


4

RAW interpretation: Torches would deal 1d4 unlit as an improvised weapon and only 1 lit as per torch description, specific overrules general. A reason for this by RAW could be it's burning, twigs and sticks that are alight are brittle and fall apart at the softest touch. Rules as Intended/Logic Torches are usually a bunch of reeds, sticks, cloth ...


1

This came up recently in our 5e game too. I ruled it as 1d4 bludgeoning +1 fire. In my specific case it was against spider webs, so the difference in damage types mattered. Not sure if that's the actual intended ruling but it made sense to us.


-4

Now I have not played 5e and I am not really an all experienced DM. But I normally play with the rules that if you hit an enemy with a torch, it deals, in the way you have put on there. 1D4 damage. but also burning damage as well (I think its normally 1d6 in 3.5e) Depending on the enemies clothing as well, I roll a D100 to see if the item of clothing is ...


1

The Runeforged weapon enhancement is from the Rise of the Runelords adventure path, appropriately enough. It was originally in the fifth volume, and can now be found in the reprinted, Pathfinder edition of the adventure path.


0

For AD&D2e, the answer is a simple "no". Only single classed Fighters got weapon specialization as an option. Most games I played in house ruled that Rangers and Paladins could also specialize, but that's house rules. If the game is using strict adherence to the rules of AD&D2e, then you lost your specialization bonuses when you dual-classed into ...


0

The closest real world analogue to a DnD 'dart' is a Bo Shruiken, Biao or similar. These weapons were thrown in the modern manner (beer in one hand, beer belly getting in your way, and with some annoying guy shouting "one hundred and eighty"). What we historically call a dart (well, there's lots of things we call a dart), but the things people are referring ...


13

Just as modern darts do, medieval military darts have fletching of some kind. A dart just looks like a short arrow with a thicker shaft. (In fact, the arrow is thought to have developed from the dart.) Being fletched missiles, they fly straight without tumbling, just like an arrow does, though perhaps with a bit of fishtailing immediately after the throw as ...


20

The Player's Handbook gives an explicit reference to how darts are thrown. In the section on Underwater Combat (PHB 198) we find: the attack roll has disadvantage [underwater] unless the weapon is a crossbow , a net, or a weapon that is thrown like a javelin (including a spear, trident, or dart). This means that a dart is not thrown spinning like a ...


-1

Unless you somehow manage to take the Free load Feat. This frees up the ranged user's minor action without worrying about reloading but i think it only works with crossbows. so there's an option


0

The damage type dealt is not defined in the Technology Devise Features because you can choose which type of damage you want it to deal. It assumes lethal damage since that is what most players and NPCs want to inflict. However, that damage type could be stated as non-lethal damage in your Definition of Primary Function. For example: Stun grenade: Deals ...


0

Given the stated criteria, the best option is the trident. You need a martial weapon (eliminate all exotics); you need to wield one-handed for somatic casting (eliminate all 2-handed); you are unwilling to invest further feats (making Finessable weapons less attractive); you prioritize hit point damage. For a small size character, that leaves a very small ...


2

I'm presenting a couple of overlooked alternatives to KRyan's excellent answer just in case you need more things from which to choose. None of these weapons meets the criterion for good (i.e. none of them are particularly high-damage weapons), but each has some decent arguments in its favor. Martial Weapons The number of martial weapons worth a feat is ...


21

First, ask your DM if you can qualify for abjurant champion with an exotic weapon; you don’t need proficiency in any martial weapons to take Exotic Weapon Proficiency, and there are some better options for exotic weapons. If exotic weapons are not allowed: Longbow There’s not a whole lot of point to getting any martial weapon; any situation where attacking ...


4

Depending on the DM's interpretation, this may be a possible strategy... Two-weapon fighting relies on the DM's definition of the slippery verb wield: If you wield a second weapon in your off hand, you can get one extra attack per round with that weapon. (PH 160). And that's because what wield means in game terms is unclear, and whether wield means ...


2

You can't do this because once you're done your iteratives with the two-hander, you have no actions left with which to attack with any other weapon, even one that's free to get ready for attacking. To do this, you would need to start your attack in two-weapon fighting "mode" — which you obviously can't with a two-handed weapon in either just one hand, or ...


1

An unbalanced weapon (like a mace, top-heavy) with enough blade to do slashing damage is basically an axe or a splitting maul. "How do I make a slashing mace?" begs the question of what weapon with mace-like qualities would do slashing damage - and the answer to that is an axe, a top-heavy weapon that actually does slashing damage. By recasting what such a ...


4

Question 1 What do they convert into? The Weapons and Size section on page 220 of the Player's Handbook says that: Large, Huge, and Gargantuan creatures use weapons that are specifically sized for them. Each size category larger than Medium increases the weapon's damage die by one size. This is followed by tables indicating the damage die size ...


0

No, unless you use a composite weapon or possess a relevant class feature you don't add any attributes into your damage roll with projectile weapons. You still add your strength modifier to the damage dealt by thrown weapons. Even with optimization, there is no way to add 1.5XDex to your ranged damage; all the relevant abilities add your full Dex modifier ...


9

No. No one gets 1.5x Dex mod or Str mod to any weapon's attack rolls, so I will assume you are thinking damage, since a 1.5x Str bonus applies to two-handed melee weapons. However, no one gets a bonus to damage, Str or Dex, when using projectile weapons in Pathfinder. It's on Page 141 of the Pathfinder core rulebook I have, under projectile weapons.


3

You can find information on creating magic items on DMG pages 284-285. It doesn't have such specific rules or price calculations as 3.5e, but enough info for a DM to create an item he/she may want. There are also rules for crafting magic items as downtime activity for players on DMG pages 128-129. One thing to consider is that magic items are supposed to be ...


-2

Personally speaking as a DM I would consider this to be rather straight forward. In my eyes, a user of a long sword would know how to make a strike with the flat of the blade. In this case you are using the sword as intended, so there wouldn't be a penalty to the attack roll. I would instead apply the penalty to the damage say 1d6 as opposed to 1d8. The ...


2

The Default Assumption In Rogue Trader, it is assumed by default that the characters are high-ranking individuals aboard their own voidship; that is operated by a crew numbering in the thousands. Now while that scenario is completely up to the GM's discretion and their campaign story, it does promote that the players' characters have at least a basic ...


-1

Improvised Weapons: Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons nonetheless see use in combat. Because such objects are not designed for this use, any creature that uses one in combat is considered to be nonproficient with it and takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls made with that object. To determine the size category and appropriate damage for an ...


2

It would be an improvised weapon. A special attack such as that would exist in a feat, whether it be core, supplemental, or third party (or a class feature). An example of a feat would be: Haft Strike Prerequisite: Two-Weapon Fighting. Benefit: When wielding a polearm two-handed you may choose to attack with the haft of the weapon. You may ...


0

To answer question 4. Given Jeremy Crawford's tweet of the order of attack and bonus attack for Shield Master feat, I believe the answer to this is "yes". The text of the tweet is as follows. As with most bonus actions, you choose the timing, so the Shield Master shove can come before or after the Attack action. The wording of the bullet point for ...


1

A Weapon "+1" is a common magic weapon, many of those in tons of variants can be found in Pathfinder, and the Rule Book actually has the rules for those weapons in it and how they affect the weapons. (Take a look at the "magic weapons" part of the book which I can't quote, as I only own it in german). I can't tell you much about other ways to "level up" a ...


4

It's just what it says. It takes a cudgel or quarterstaff in your possession and temporarily makes it a +1 magical weapon. That's the only effect and it lasts as long as the spell. There are a number of other spells such as Magic Weapon or Returning Weapon that can temporarily modify a weapon with various bonuses and abilities. The one thing all these spells ...



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