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[W] means the damage die of the weapon including static bonuses. Static bonuses are magical enhancement bonuses on the weapon, any such damage boosters such as dragonshards, which are augmented to the weapon


-3

No. How could you? Let's step away from looking for tea leaves in the rules for a moment and look at the real world for a moment. When someone shoots with a bow, they stand with one arm out, holding the body of the bow, and the other arm back at their jaw, heading turned to the side and looking down the shaft of the arrow to aim. Where could someone even ...


2

The Rule in question: from Page 192, Blood and Smoke, or from Page 240 from God Machine Chronicles (and not in Demon). Stun Gun Die Bonus 0, Durability 2, Size 1, Structure 2, Availability •, ••, o r ••• Effect: A stun gun is designed to deliver an overwhelming amount of electricity to an assailant in order to shut down her ...


11

When you see [W] in a damage expression, it just means the weapon die as per the basic equipment description. For your character with the greataxe, that means 2[W] equals 2d12 All the bonuses add afterwards, they are not multiplied. Bonuses from feats and equipment are not included in the damage descriptions of powers, but how to add them is described ...


8

Before going into the mechanics in detail: You might have noticed that Electric Damage is very lethal in nWoD. It is also broadly speaking inaccurate, but that is ok. In nWoD Damage is related almost solely to voltage, in reality current takes a more important effect. A Shock Baton or Electric Fence is actual high voltage, low current. So is kinda more ...


7

The book Armory has official rules for stun batons, a paragraph under Stun guns, on p. 36. The entry describes how stun guns work (short: the electricity doesn't cause damage, it knocks the target unconscious for a specific number of rounds), and A baton version of this weapon [of the stun gun] exists. The baton can be used as a club to cause damage ...


2

No, double weapons take both hands. This is not as obvious as it could be in the original version of the Adventurer's Vault, where they were introduced, but Wizards has cleared this up with errata. There's a new sidebar for Double Weapons (page 2 of the linked errata), which explicitly says: You must wield a double weapon in two hands to use it. ...


4

No. To use the Double Weapon you have to have it in both of your hands (it's too heavy to wield effectively in one hand). So if you want to attack with the double sword, you have to have both hands on it. But. If all you want to do is pull a hand off the double weapon, pull and chuck a hand axe, and then put your hand back on the double weapon, yeah you ...


14

Buying Magic Items You may want to go by the rules instead of "something you read online." Let's look at the Magic Item Creation rules in the official D&D 3.5e SRD here: http://www.d20srd.org/srd/magicItems/creatingMagicItems.htm Per http://www.d20srd.org/srd/magicItems/magicWeapons.htm#tableWeapons the base cost (value of) placing a +3 enhancement (or ...


8

3²×2,000 gp = 18,000 gp like you calculated, not 12,000. You had the price right the first time. But you cannot add a special property, like cruel or defending, to an item that does not already have a +1 enhancement. Thus, your item would actually be a +1 cruel defending furious fire-forged morningstar, and cost 4²×2,000 gp + 908 gp = 32,908 gp. Also, ...


12

You can't find anything barring this because there isn't: you can stack these properties, and really, most if not all other properties. Weapon properties are expensive: what makes you think you shouldn't be able to get your money's worth? The command activation isn't really that important: once you give the command, the energy damage stays until you turn it ...



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