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23

Yes, and this is explicitly stated on page 114 of the Player's Handbook in the "Your Spellbook" sidebar in the Wizard class description. It works exactly as you are hoping: If you lose your spellbook, you can use the [procedure in the preceeding paragraph] to transcribe the spells that you have prepared into a new spellbook. Filling out the remainder of ...


18

No, they're not the same. The wizard's fine inks are cheaper! the material components you expended as you experiment with the spell to master it, as well as fine inks you need to record it The 50 gp the wizard spends covers piles of duplicate material components, and also some good-quality ink. Even cheap material components add up when you're using ...


14

The published rules don't go into this level of detail. As far as I see it there are two basic ways to rule this. The pragmatic approach Fine inks are rare, and rare inks are fine. They cost about the same, so they are the same. The flavourful approach For example: A wizard's fine inks are the sort you could use to write an invitation to a society ball. ...


9

There is no explicit equivalence. However, the identical cost and function suggests that it's all the same sort of office supplies being used. Game mechanically, the ink is essentially just flavoring for the cost of adding spells to a book. In most cases the wizard could have just given the warlock 50 gp instead. There's no economic impact to the game in ...


8

There is a supplement, Houserule Handbooks: Spell Points, that introduces a point-based system for spellcasters. It's received favorable reviews and the PDF is only $5 on Paizo's site.


8

Yes. PHB 114: When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a level for which you have spell slots and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it. No mention that it has to be in a wizard book, just that it is a wizard spell. Similar text exists for the Ritual Caster feat. The Warlock's ...


4

Maybe the wizard can copy the spell into her spellbook... The 5e rules for multiclassing (PHB p. 164) state that your spells known and prepared are based on your class level for each class, but your spell slots are based on your combined levels, which may result in you having spell slots of higher level than any of the spells you know. They provide an ...


3

As it stands, the question cannot be answered on its face: “over-the-top, completely unrealistic cheese” is undefined and critical to try to do a comparison of the mechanical advantages of each class. This answer, however, is challenging the frame of the question, since it compares the two classes regardless of what each is or isn’t allowed to do. Artificer ...


2

At this point, there is no way by RAW in the Basic Rules (or in the Player's Handbook) of increasing your number of spell slots you have as a Wizard. That said, there are a few ways of effectively increasing your number of spell slots - either by restoring spell slots or providing other ways to cast your known/prepared spells - in the Dungeon Master's Guide ...


1

"Fine" means "of high quality", while rare means "hard to get". If your DM is a mean person, she won't equate those. On the other hand, maybe it goes one way, but not the other: maybe the "rare" inks can be used in place of "fine" ones (hard to get ink should be of high quality, right?), while "fine" inks can't be used in place of "rare" ones (there's a ...


1

If all you want to do is require wizards to use some alchemical fluff to prepare spells, then you don't have to do anything. Adding fluff like "training time" or "spell component costs" has a long history in Pathfinder's lineage, and so long as you don't make it exceptionally hard to obtain the alchemy, or otherwise make working magic unreasonably ...



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