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25

No. The Monk feature says that you can use the bonus action Unarmed strike after you use the Attack action with a Monk weapon or Unarmed strike. Shocking Grasp requires the Cast a Spell action, which does not qualify.


14

The second sentence is simply the description/justification for the first sentence. The only effects are the ones described: resistance to necrotic damage and immunity to maximum hit point reduction. In case it's the source of your confusion: "inured" just means "accustomed to". So this is just saying that you've been hanging around with undead for so long ...


12

Pg. 150/153 holds the answer. PHB pg. 150 A book might contain poetry, historical accounts, information pertaining to a particular field of lore, diagrams and notes on gnomish contraptions, or just about anything else that can be represented using text or pictures. A book of spells is a spellbook (described later in this section). And... PHB ...


11

No, you can't write the spells you know as a Bard into your spellbook. There are 2 ways (outside of levelling as a Wizard) that a Wizard can add spells to their spellbook. The first is by finding them: When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a spell level you can prepare and if you can spare ...


10

No. Minor Conjuration would need to say “an exact replica of an object you've seen” or some other very precise wording, if it was capable of doing that. Instead, it allow you to conjure objects limited to the kinds of objects you've seen before: its form must be that of a nonmagical object that you have seen. … That is to say, it conjures an object by ...


7

I'm assuming here that your DM does not allow you to "cheat" by taking long rests more than once every 24 hours. Your magic items are a Tome of the Stilled Tongue and 2 × Pearls of Power. Every day, you have the following spell slots you can use to make or control undead: 9th level: 1 + 1 from Arcane Recovery + 1 from Tome of the Stilled Tongue = 3 8th ...


7

You can copy spells into a regular book. You can copy a spell from your own spellbook into another book—for example, if you want to make a backup copy of your spellbook. That's about as far as it goes, though. A book and a spellbook are separate items, and anything that requires a spellbook won't work with a regular book. You can't prepare spells ...


7

Yes, Pathfinder recomends that The cost to research a new spell, and the time required, are left up to GM discretion, but it should probably take at least 1 week and cost at least 1,000 gp per level of the spell to be researched. But the corresponding section in PHB 3.5 reads only A wizard also can research a spell independently, duplicating an ...


5

RAW, no. The DC for the outsider is Charisma based, and I'm unaware of any archetypes or prestige classes that change this. Given that DC base is 15 instead of 10 it seems likely the designers were aware of how low most Wizards' charismas scores would be for this sort of thing, and may have intentionally given Sorcerers an advantage on this to fit the ...


4

Wizards are described as only being able to copy Wizard spells in the spellbook sidebar, and the available sources only appear to be one of four locations: A spell in another caster's spellbook A spell on a scroll A spell in your own spellbook (reduced cost) A spell you currently have prepared (reduced cost) Nevertheless, you're still restricted to ...


3

The spell level * 1,000 gp price is a abstract representation of the resources required to research a spell. Nominally you are paying for the materials and equipment gathered and built by somebody else and then spend the time use it to develop the spell. If the character is willing to spend even more time then it is plausible that he gathers those ...


3

You get to repeat Freezing Cloud's attack against creatures that enter the cloud or start their turn there. Freezing Cloud has an attack line. When you use the power, you make that attack and resolve its hit effects on any targets you hit. Freezing Cloud also creates a zone. Until the end of your next turn, any time a creature starts its turn in the zone ...


3

Yes. Reverse Gravity states: All creatures [...] that aren't somehow anchored to the ground in the area fall upward... It says nothing about flying creatures being unaffected. Therefore they are affected.


2

A book would not be suitable, as it already contains ". . . poetry, historical accounts, information pertaining to a particular field of lore, diagrams and notes on gnomish contraptions, . . . ", leaving just the margins for a wizard to scrawl his notes. The more expensive "spellbook" is blank, ready to have spells written on its pages.


2

Yes I don't know of a way to increase the number of actual spell slots you have as a pure wizard, but you can make a trade off by multiclassing. When you gain levels as a full caster (bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, wizard), the levels all add together to determine the number of available spell slots, which are shared between them. That is, a wizard 5 will ...


2

Protecting against accidental damage The main threat to a spellbook is it being targeted on purpose. It's unlikely to be destroyed accidentally because: Unless the descriptive text for a spell (or attack) specifies otherwise, all items carried or worn by a creature are assumed to survive a magical attack. Even if you roll a 1, only exposed items will ...


2

Basic Idea The basic idea is that you give your familiar some kind items, and the familiar can drop the items on the battlefield. You are making your familiar into a kind of air-raid or artillery unit. Professor Q's post describes this in a bit more detail. Other Questions do I have to give him instructions? Short answer: yes. At level 5 you can ...


2

The first sentence describes all game rules. The second sentence is just role-playing flavor without any mechanical relevance, because "the worst effects of dealing with undead and the forces that animate them" is not a properly defined concept. Regarding the question "Do I become ugly like a zombie?" - if anything it makes you less likely to become an ...


1

I believe the inks used in writing spells are at least semi-magical seeing how high the price is compared to regular ink. I'd say, you'd have the THEORY of the spell without the magic. You'd probably have to pay the full price of the ink to make the spells magical, with a chance to screw up as normal as you have NO IDEA of the spellwork woven into the ...



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